Goddess Grant Me Protection From The Outside World

Witchy Comments
Goddess, Give me protection from the outside world,

Let whatever people say about me not hurt,

Let whatever I fear not bother me,

Let all the mixed up feelings inside be released without harm,

Goddess, you see my pain,

I am thy child, I am thy soul,

I need a dream to cast away this pain,

Something to soothe my soul,

Give me protection from the outside world.

—-Author Unknown

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About This Day, November 29th, Black Friday 2013

November 29th

Black Friday 2013

 

That the day after Thanksgiving is the “official” start of the holiday shopping season may be linked together with the idea of Santa Claus parades. Parades celebrating Thanksgiving often include an appearance by Santa at the end of the parade, with the idea that ‘Santa has arrived’ or ‘Santa is just around the corner’ because Christmas is always the next major holiday following Thanksgiving.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many Santa or Thanksgiving Day parades were sponsored by department stores. These include the Toronto Santa Claus Parade, in Canada, sponsored by Eaton’s, and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade sponsored by Macy’s. Department stores would use the parades to launch a big advertising push. Eventually it just became an unwritten rule that no store would try doing Christmas advertising before the parade was over. Therefore, the day after Thanksgiving became the day when the shopping season officially started.

Later on, the fact that this marked the official start of the shopping season led to controversy. In 1939, retail shops would have liked to have a longer shopping season, but no store wanted to break with tradition and be the one to start advertising before Thanksgiving. President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the date for Thanksgiving one week earlier, leading to much anger by the public who wound up having to change holiday plans. Some even refused the change, resulting in the U.S. citizens celebrating Thanksgiving on two separate days. Some started referring to the change as Franksgiving.

Good Black Friday Morning, my dear family & friends!

Good Black Friday Morning, dear family & friends!

How many of you have braved the crowds and the cold this morning? You are a braver soul than I am, lol! We had one of heaters that we use to keep the critters warm go out. So I have to venture out today and pick up a new one. Believe it or not, I am dreading that.

So did everyone have a nice Thanksgiving? Lots of good food & good company? I know I had an excellent meal yesterday. My daughter has turned out to be an wonderful cook. We got ready to leave, she packed me down with leftovers galore. I’m not complaining I will probably has turkey for the next week. I love turkey. I don’t know why I think you can eat it only a certain time of the year. The funny thing, no sooner had we got through with eating turkey and dressing, she started talking about Christmas. She knows I celebrate Yule and she also knows when she was growing up I celebrated Christmas with them. Since both of my children have become adults, I have come out and told them, “I don’t celebrate Christmas.” I do believe that is when I was told I was going to hell, huh? The funny part was, she would mention getting the fixings and me doing the cooking. Every time she would say, “So I buy everything you need and you can cook?” I believe she is getting a taste of what dear old mom did all these years. It is good though to be with family at this time of year. It would be even better that this feeling we have or perhaps tradition to be with family would last all year long. Don’t get me wrong about what I am trying to say. It just seems like at special season, we long for family and friends, to be with them is a must. We should have that feeling last all year long.

I am stopping now, I feel a soapbox moment coming on and I am hushing. I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving and may the rest of the holiday be relaxing and joyful. Don’t get knocked about in the malls and please don’t get shot (yes, shot! We had a local shooting around here this morning over sales!). Perhaps if you do go out, wear some body armor. We also had several fights around here too. The world, what is it coming too!

I am going to get busy now. Enjoy your holiday and please stay safe!

Luv & Hugs,
Lady A

Cosmic Tips to Conquer Holiday Family Stress

Cosmic Tips to Conquer Holiday Family Stress

See how Astrology can help you through the holidays!

Tarotcom Staff     Tarotcom Staff on the topics of thanksgiving, holidays, astrology

Let’s get real: Life is not a Norman Rockwell painting. When it comes to spending a lot of time with family during the holidays, the most wonderful time of the year can quickly turn into the most stressful time of the year.

Even the people we love the most have a unique way of pushing our buttons when we spend too much time together. Add that to the stress of juggling holiday parties, meal planning and gift shopping from Thanksgiving to New Year’s, and … well, let’s just say it’s easy to go from holly jolly to downright brawly in the blink of Santa’s eye.

Astrology can help you watch for the things that trigger your horoscope sign’s stress levels most. Here are some cosmic tips on how every zodiac sign can cope with stressful family situations all season long.

Aries (March 21 – April 19)

Even dynamic Rams can run out of energy during the holidays, and it stresses you out when you don’t have enough steam to get everything done. If a family member asks for one more thing on top of this, watch out for your fiery temper! Prevent a meltdown by setting aside at least one hour of alone time per day. Delegate some of your tasks to others and go for a walk or take a nap. You don’t have to do everything yourself — that’s what family is for!

Taurus (April 20 – May 20)

Taurus, you’re the peacemaker, and your family relies on you to solve disputes over the dinner table during the holidays. And you know what? That stresses you out! You don’t like to witness conflict or hurt feelings, and it’s even worse if you can’t help settle everyone down because then you feel like you’ve failed. If you find yourself stressed by family drama this year, use your stubborn nature to cope. Insist everyone calm down and speak respectfully, and don’t walk away until peace prevails.

Gemini (May 21 – June 20)

You don’t suffer fools gladly, Gemini. Your short temper can be triggered when a family member says something you disagree with, or if they move too slowly — like when Granny drives you to the mall in her 1987 Cutlass Ciera. You need to practice patience, dear Gemini. Take part in daily activities to calm your overactive mind, like yoga or an art class to, so you won’t blow a gasket at Thanksgiving dinner.

Cancer (June 21 – July 22)

Sensitive Cancer Crabs are especially prone to holiday family stress. You are very negatively affected by criticism, angry outbursts or being ignored. And it’s easy for certain family members to hurt your feelings unintentionally — like if one of your siblings seems to be getting preferential treatment, or if someone accidentally insults you with a nose trimmer as a holiday gift. To keep Crab from getting crabby, it’s important you speak up and let the offending family member know how you feel. Don’t keep your hurt feelings to yourself, or you’ll wind up nursing a stress-related ulcer. Take a deep breath and let your feelings be known, and more than likely you’ll find peace in an apology.

Leo (July 23 – Aug. 22)

Leo, you need to let go. Your stress triggers are primarily situations you can’t control, and that is an inevitable part of the holidays. One of your family members might break the gravy dish, you may lose your car in the mall parking garage on Black Friday, or Uncle Jerry might infer that your career choice falls short of family expectations. Whatever it is that takes place to trigger your insecurities and prompt you to throw a childish temper tantrum… Let. It. Go. You’ll be much happier that way.

Virgo (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22)

You think too much, Virgo — which accounts for your greatest holiday stress. Just the thought of getting all your holiday chores done and attending to every family member’s needs is enough to tie you in knots. But the thing is, once you actually start working on the things you need to get done, you’re fine. Make lots of lists to help keep you on track – write down what you can do to help others, too. You’ll feel calmer just putting it all on paper. Pretend you’re making a list for Santa, it’ll be fun!

Libra (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22)

Not being treated fairly is hugely stressful for you, Libra. And you also can’t deal with a lot of clutter. But during large family holiday gatherings, it’s easy for these needs to be neglected. If someone takes the last slice of pumpkin pie before you’ve had any, and then has the nerve to leave the dirty dish on the counter, look out! That will set you off, and you could waste hours weighing the pros and cons of confronting them about it. Rather than seething in silence or overreacting defensively, respond calmly in the moment. Keep it short and sweet — no long-winded speeches or accusations. You’ll get better results once people know where you stand.

Scorpio (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21)

Your family doesn’t realize how sensitive you are, Scorpio, because you hide it well. You have a quiet strength, so you’re easily stressed out by big noisy family gatherings. You also feel tense and nervous when you don’t get enough privacy, so be sure to let your family members know your needs and boundaries so you can negotiate what works for all. It may be as simple as going into a private room alone for an hour to regroup, or leaving a lit bit sooner than the rest of the clan. If you explain, they will understand.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21)

You’re all about movement, Sagittarius, so the idea of sitting in a relative’s living room for five hours straight is your personal hell. You’re also not big on formal family dinners where you must act properly and “behave.” Any situation that reins you in can trigger stress, like someone pressuring you to buy too many gifts or show up on time for dinner. Find ways to spend some time outdoors to feed your restless spirit. Help decorate the family home with outdoor lights or shovel snow from the sidewalks up and down the street so you won’t feel so constrained.

Capricorn (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19)

You demand a lot from yourself, Capricorn. And, you feel pressured when you fail to live up to your high expectations during the holidays. You worry worry worry about serving the right holiday dishes, buying the right gifts or telling the right jokes at the holiday dinner table. You can end up going over the “what ifs” or “if onlys” ’til you’re all lathered up. The remedy is to live in the moment, the only place where joy can be found. And, be sure there’s plenty of time to relax in your hectic holiday schedule.

Aquarius (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18)

Though “live and let live” is your motto, Aquarius, you really like to have your way. But when you’re surrounded by family members during the holidays, you need to learn the art of compromise. You don’t need to bend your will entirely to that of every family member, but do make more of an effort to accommodate their needs, too. You’re a little high-strung even when it’s not the holiday season, so trying to do so much traveling, partying, shopping and planning in so little time can stress you out right quick. Just slow down a little. Ironically, by slowing down you’ll actually get more done and feel more relaxed.

Pisces (Feb. 19 – March 20)

You’re a very private person, Pisces, so nosy family members or being put on the spot at a family gathering in which you feel exposed can be stressful. And you’re sensitive nature is also unnerved by loud family revelry, teasing and obnoxious behavior. You might become overly anxious in these family holiday situations because you don’t know how to shield yourself from such invasions. It’s difficult, but if you can give yourself a temporary attitude adjustment you’ll fare much better. Keep thinking “This too shall pass,” and take little escapes for an hour here and there so you get plenty of time alone to process your emotions and clear your slate.

FRIDAY – The Day of the Love, 
The Day of Venus

FRIDAY

The Day of the Love
The Day of Venus

frigedaeg or frige dag (Anglo-Saxon) freitag (Germanic) dies veneris (Latin) sukra-var (Hindu) juma (Islamic) vendredi (French) kin youbi (Japanese)

This is traditionally the sixth day of the week. The name given to this day in ancient Rome was ‘dies Veneris’ as is was a day dedicated to Venus. Later the French named the day ‘Vendredi’ believed to have derived from the same origin. In northern countries the closest equivalent to the Goddess Venus was ‘Frigg’ or ‘Freya’ with the day becoming known by the Anglo-Saxons as ‘Frige dag’, later to Friday. Traditionally associated in many parts of Europe with misfortune as this was believed to be the day when Christ was crucified at Calvary, and also that this was the day that Adam was tempted by Eve with the Forbidden Fruit. Within the Roman Catholic faith Friday was traditionally a day of abstinence. Today it is a still viewed as a day for some private act of self-denial (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter). According to tradition there are some practices that should be avoided if possible on a Friday including, births, weddings, the sailing of a ship, cutting your nails or starting a new job. This is indicated in the following rhyme:

‘Whoever be born on Friday or it’s night, He shall be accursed of men, Silly and crafty and loathsome to all men, And shall ever be thinking evil in his heart, And shall be a thief and a great coward, And shall not live longer than to middle age.’

A contradiction is expressed if a child was born on this day in ‘Days of the Week’, which indicated a more favourable omen. And indeed it is said that in 1492 Columbus set sail and sighted land on a Friday. In Hungarian (Europe) folklore it was believed be an omen of bad luck to be born on a Friday although it was believed that the onset of misfortune could be avoided or removed by placing some of your own blood on some of your own old clothing and then burning it. The criminal underworld have an old belief that ‘a burglary committed on a Friday will probably result in arrest’ as perhaps a sign of divine intervention and retribution upon the criminal, and if you were bought to trial for any offence on a Friday it was thought to be a bad omen. In the British Isles and USA Friday was the customary day to carry-out hangings and so was sometimes referred to as ‘Hangman’s Day’ or ‘Hanging Day’. (This perhaps is connected to the Christian belief in a Friday being the worst day of the week, as this was the day identified with the Crucifixion and the death of Christ). If it rains on a Friday an old rural belief (UK) was that it indicated the forecast would be fine on the following Sunday. If you dreamt on a Friday night of an event or people and then told the content of the dream to someone in your family on the Saturday morning it was more likely to happen. In Scotland (UK) and Germany (Europe) according to an old belief Friday was thought to be a good day to go courting (dating). Norse men traditionally saw this as a positive day, the luckiest of the week. ‘Black Friday’ has been regularly used to label days of significance within the British culture. This was the name given to December 6 1745 in the British Isles. This was the day that information reached London (UK) that the Young Pretender had reached Derby (UK). The threatened General Strike was cancelled on 15 April 1921 affecting the stance of the British Labour Movement (UK). The Government (USA) flooded the open market with gold to bring down prices on 24 September 1869 ruining the livelihoods of many speculators in USA. Mohammedans believe that Adam was created on a Friday, and so the day is seen to be the Sabbath. It is also believed that Eve tempted Adam with the Forbidden Fruit on this day, and that later both died on a Friday. Friday is believed to be a day of misfortune too for Buddhists and Brahmins. ‘Long Friday’ was another name given to Good Friday (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter) by the Saxons. It is thought that the name derived from the fact that this was a day of abstinence. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

FRIDAY – The Day of the Love, 
The Day of Venus

Days Of The Week Comments
FRIDAY

The Day of the Love
The Day of Venus

frigedaeg or frige dag (Anglo-Saxon) freitag (Germanic) dies veneris (Latin) sukra-var (Hindu) juma (Islamic) vendredi (French) kin youbi (Japanese)

This is traditionally the sixth day of the week. The name given to this day in ancient Rome was ‘dies Veneris’ as is was a day dedicated to Venus. Later the French named the day ‘Vendredi’ believed to have derived from the same origin. In northern countries the closest equivalent to the Goddess Venus was ‘Frigg’ or ‘Freya’ with the day becoming known by the Anglo-Saxons as ‘Frige dag’, later to Friday. Traditionally associated in many parts of Europe with misfortune as this was believed to be the day when Christ was crucified at Calvary, and also that this was the day that Adam was tempted by Eve with the Forbidden Fruit. Within the Roman Catholic faith Friday was traditionally a day of abstinence. Today it is a still viewed as a day for some private act of self-denial (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter). According to tradition there are some practices that should be avoided if possible on a Friday including, births, weddings, the sailing of a ship, cutting your nails or starting a new job. This is indicated in the following rhyme:

‘Whoever be born on Friday or it’s night, He shall be accursed of men, Silly and crafty and loathsome to all men, And shall ever be thinking evil in his heart, And shall be a thief and a great coward, And shall not live longer than to middle age.’

A contradiction is expressed if a child was born on this day in ‘Days of the Week’, which indicated a more favourable omen. And indeed it is said that in 1492 Columbus set sail and sighted land on a Friday. In Hungarian (Europe) folklore it was believed be an omen of bad luck to be born on a Friday although it was believed that the onset of misfortune could be avoided or removed by placing some of your own blood on some of your own old clothing and then burning it. The criminal underworld have an old belief that ‘a burglary committed on a Friday will probably result in arrest’ as perhaps a sign of divine intervention and retribution upon the criminal, and if you were bought to trial for any offence on a Friday it was thought to be a bad omen. In the British Isles and USA Friday was the customary day to carry-out hangings and so was sometimes referred to as ‘Hangman’s Day’ or ‘Hanging Day’. (This perhaps is connected to the Christian belief in a Friday being the worst day of the week, as this was the day identified with the Crucifixion and the death of Christ). If it rains on a Friday an old rural belief (UK) was that it indicated the forecast would be fine on the following Sunday. If you dreamt on a Friday night of an event or people and then told the content of the dream to someone in your family on the Saturday morning it was more likely to happen. In Scotland (UK) and Germany (Europe) according to an old belief Friday was thought to be a good day to go courting (dating). Norse men traditionally saw this as a positive day, the luckiest of the week. ‘Black Friday’ has been regularly used to label days of significance within the British culture. This was the name given to December 6 1745 in the British Isles. This was the day that information reached London (UK) that the Young Pretender had reached Derby (UK). The threatened General Strike was cancelled on 15 April 1921 affecting the stance of the British Labour Movement (UK). The Government (USA) flooded the open market with gold to bring down prices on 24 September 1869 ruining the livelihoods of many speculators in USA. Mohammedans believe that Adam was created on a Friday, and so the day is seen to be the Sabbath. It is also believed that Eve tempted Adam with the Forbidden Fruit on this day, and that later both died on a Friday. Friday is believed to be a day of misfortune too for Buddhists and Brahmins. ‘Long Friday’ was another name given to Good Friday (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter) by the Saxons. It is thought that the name derived from the fact that this was a day of abstinence. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

FRIDAY – The Day of the Love, The Day of Venus

FRIDAY

The Day of the Love, The Day of Venus

frigedaeg or frige dag (Anglo-Saxon) freitag (Germanic) dies veneris (Latin) sukra-var (Hindu) juma (Islamic) vendredi (French) kin youbi (Japanese)

This is traditionally the sixth day of the week. The name given to this day in ancient Rome was ‘dies Veneris’ as is was a day dedicated to Venus. Later the French named the day ‘Vendredi’ believed to have derived from the same origin. In northern countries the closest equivalent to the Goddess Venus was ‘Frigg’ or ‘Freya’ with the day becoming known by the Anglo-Saxons as ‘Frige dag’, later to Friday.

Traditionally associated in many parts of Europe with misfortune as this was believed to be the day when Christ was crucified at Calvary, and also that this was the day that Adam was tempted by Eve with the Forbidden Fruit. Within the Roman Catholic faith Friday was traditionally a day of abstinence. Today it is a still viewed as a day for some private act of self-denial.

According to tradition there are some practices that should be avoided if possible on a Friday including, births, weddings, the sailing of a ship, cutting your nails or starting a new job. This is indicated in the following rhyme:

‘Whoever be born on Friday or it’s night,
He shall be accursed of men,
Silly and crafty and loathsome to all men,
And shall ever be thinking evil in his heart,
And shall be a thief and a great coward,
And shall not live longer than to middle age.’

A contradiction is expressed if a child was born on this day in ‘Days of the Week’, which indicated a more favourable omen. And indeed it is said that in 1492 Columbus set sail and sighted land on a Friday.

In Hungarian (Europe) folklore it was believed be an omen of bad luck to be born on a Friday although it was believed that the onset of misfortune could be avoided or removed by placing some of your own blood on some of your own old clothing and then burning it.
The criminal underworld have an old belief that ‘a burglary committed on a Friday will probably result in arrest’ as perhaps a sign of divine intervention and retribution upon the criminal, and if you were bought to trial for any offence on a Friday it was thought to be a bad omen. In the British Isles and USA Friday was the customary day to carry-out hangings and so was sometimes referred to as ‘Hangman’s Day’ or ‘Hanging Day’. (This perhaps is connected to the Christian belief in a Friday being the worst day of the week, as this was the day identified with the Crucifixion and the death of Christ).
If it rains on a Friday an old rural belief (UK) was that it indicated the forecast would be fine on the following Sunday.

If you dreamt on a Friday night of an event or people and then told the content of the dream to someone in your family on the Saturday morning it was more likely to happen.
In Scotland (UK) and Germany (Europe) according to an old belief Friday was thought to be a good day to go courting (dating). Norse men traditionally saw this as a positive day, the luckiest of the week.

‘Black Friday’ has been regularly used to label days of significance within the British culture. This was the name given to December 6 1745 in the British Isles. This was the day that information reached London (UK) that the Young Pretender had reached Derby (UK). The threatened General Strike was cancelled on 15 April 1921 affecting the stance of the British Labour Movement (UK). The Government (USA) flooded the open market with gold to bring down prices on 24 September 1869 ruining the livelihoods of many speculators in USA.

Mohammedans believe that Adam was created on a Friday, and so the day is seen to be the Sabbath. It is also believed that Eve tempted Adam with the Forbidden Fruit on this day, and that later both died on a Friday.

Friday is believed to be a day of misfortune too for Buddhists and Brahmins.
‘Long Friday’ was another name given to Good Friday (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter) by the Saxons. It is thought that the name derived from the fact that this was a day of abstinence.

According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

FRIDAY – The Day of the Love, 
The Day of Venus

FRIDAY

The Day of the Love
The Day of Venus

frigedaeg or frige dag (Anglo-Saxon) freitag (Germanic) dies veneris (Latin) sukra-var (Hindu) juma (Islamic) vendredi (French) kin youbi (Japanese)

This is traditionally the sixth day of the week. The name given to this day in ancient Rome was ‘dies Veneris’ as is was a day dedicated to Venus. Later the French named the day ‘Vendredi’ believed to have derived from the same origin. In northern countries the closest equivalent to the Goddess Venus was ‘Frigg’ or ‘Freya’ with the day becoming known by the Anglo-Saxons as ‘Frige dag’, later to Friday. Traditionally associated in many parts of Europe with misfortune as this was believed to be the day when Christ was crucified at Calvary, and also that this was the day that Adam was tempted by Eve with the Forbidden Fruit. Within the Roman Catholic faith Friday was traditionally a day of abstinence. Today it is a still viewed as a day for some private act of self-denial. According to tradition there are some practices that should be avoided if possible on a Friday including, births, weddings, the sailing of a ship, cutting your nails or starting a new job. This is indicated in the following rhyme:

‘Whoever be born on Friday or it’s night, He shall be accursed of men, Silly and crafty and loathsome to all men, And shall ever be thinking evil in his heart, And shall be a thief and a great coward, And shall not live longer than to middle age.’

A contradiction is expressed if a child was born on this day in ‘Days of the Week’, which indicated a more favourable omen. And indeed it is said that in 1492 Columbus set sail and sighted land on a Friday. In Hungarian (Europe) folklore it was believed be an omen of bad luck to be born on a Friday although it was believed that the onset of misfortune could be avoided or removed by placing some of your own blood on some of your own old clothing and then burning it. The criminal underworld have an old belief that ‘a burglary committed on a Friday will probably result in arrest’ as perhaps a sign of divine intervention and retribution upon the criminal, and if you were bought to trial for any offence on a Friday it was thought to be a bad omen. In the British Isles and USA Friday was the customary day to carry-out hangings and so was sometimes referred to as ‘Hangman’s Day’ or ‘Hanging Day’. (This perhaps is connected to the Christian belief in a Friday being the worst day of the week, as this was the day identified with the Crucifixion and the death of Christ). If it rains on a Friday an old rural belief (UK) was that it indicated the forecast would be fine on the following Sunday. If you dreamt on a Friday night of an event or people and then told the content of the dream to someone in your family on the Saturday morning it was more likely to happen. In Scotland (UK) and Germany (Europe) according to an old belief Friday was thought to be a good day to go courting (dating). Norse men traditionally saw this as a positive day, the luckiest of the week. ‘Black Friday’ has been regularly used to label days of significance within the British culture. This was the name given to December 6 1745 in the British Isles. This was the day that information reached London (UK) that the Young Pretender had reached Derby (UK). The threatened General Strike was cancelled on 15 April 1921 affecting the stance of the British Labour Movement (UK). The Government (USA) flooded the open market with gold to bring down prices on 24 September 1869 ruining the livelihoods of many speculators in USA. Mohammedans believe that Adam was created on a Friday, and so the day is seen to be the Sabbath. It is also believed that Eve tempted Adam with the Forbidden Fruit on this day, and that later both died on a Friday. Friday is believed to be a day of misfortune too for Buddhists and Brahmins. ‘Long Friday’ was another name given to Good Friday (For further information see Mystical WWW Easter) by the Saxons. It is thought that the name derived from the fact that this was a day of abstinence. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

Healthy Recipes for Your Thanksgiving Leftovers

Healthy Recipes for Your Thanksgiving Leftovers

  • posted by Brandi, selected from Diets in Review

 

The day after Thanksgiving, aka Black Friday, is practically a food holiday too considering refrigerators across the country are still bursting with leftover stuffing, mashed potatoes and plenty of turkey. If you’re trying to lose weight or maintain your size this holiday season, indulging in seconds and thirds of your favorite holiday dishes can really derail your efforts. As if one 3,000-calorie Thanksgiving meal wasn’t enough!

We don’t want that food to go to waste any more than you do, so here are some ideas to break up the monotony of that roasted turkey without turning a one-day calorie fest into a weekend smorgasbord.

Turkey Quesadillas: Typically we think of quesadillas being filled with cheese, which equates to fat and calories. Try putting a healthy spin on quesadillas and top them with fresh salsa, which has practically no calories.

Hot Turkey Club Sandwich: After an indulgent dinner like Thanksgiving, keeping your diet simple the next day is the easiest way to stay on track. Prepare a simple club sandwich by layering roasted turkey, tomato, spinach leaves or romaine lettuce, and a smear of guacamole or avocados (instead of mayo) on two slices of whole grain bread.

Turkey Waldorf Salad: Instead of a rich, turkey salad laden with mayonnaise and calories, opt for a lighter version of Waldorf salad. Add leftover apples, raisins, and walnuts for a satisfying crunch.

Turkey Apple Pita: Instead of grazing aimlessly during your Black Friday lunch, add roasted turkey to a whole wheat pita topped with apple slices and your favorite vegetables for a little savory and sweet flavor.

Red Beans and Rice: Let simmer all day and then serve a piping hot bowl of this New Orleans favorite while you watch football. Add any leftover roasted turkey for a leaner addition than the traditional andouille sausage.

Of course, turkey isn’t the only thing left in the fridge. Here are a few other ideas for cleaning out without pigging out.

  • Cranberries. Add a tablespoon of fresh cranberry salad to a plain, honey, or vanilla-flavored Greek yogurt for a sweet way to start your morning. If you have leftover pumpkin pie filling you can do the same with it.
  • Stuffing. Put leftover stuffing inside acorn squash or bell peppers and bake for a simple and healthy dinner.
  • Vegetables. Any leftover green beans, carrots, celery, onions, or other vegetables should be saved while you’re preparing the meal. Toss it all in a stock pot, cover with water, season with salt and pepper, and let simmer on low for several hours. Then strain the liquid off and you’ve got a homemade vegetarian broth.
  • Potatoes. Use any remaining roasted red or sweet potatoes to make a delicious side with an omelet. Heat a skillet, mist with cooking spray, and cook until warm and slightly browned.

 

Feng Shui Tip of the Day for November 25th

Oh, what to do? One calendar invests today’s energies in ‘Black Friday’ pre-holiday sales, but other calendars call today ‘Buy Nothing Day.’ So you can clearly see my confusion. Maybe we should spend our time learning about what Feng Shui says about the color black in the hopes of making it work for you! As far as ‘Black Friday’ is concerned, retailers use this term to suggest that today you can take advantage of low prices to stay in the black by spending less green. But black has its own identity when it comes to how color affects the psyche and the subconscious. Black is the Feng Shui color of mystery and magic that also holds the ability to provide protection and power. The color of night as well as the universal void, Feng Shui suggests using black when you want to add depth, strength or definition to any space. Just remember that a little goes a long way, and never use it in a child’s room. But do use it when you want to ground energies. Black is often employed when attempting to activate the energies associated with career, self-esteem and destiny! Putting an image of a waterfall inside a black frame and hanging it in either your front hallway or your ‘Career’ area will bring a wave of job opportunities that will not only put you in the flow but also keep you in the black!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com