Celebrating 365 Days of Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for November 24th – Thanksgiving (approximately)

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November 24th

Thanksgiving (approximately)

 

The American Thanksgiving Day began in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1621, and celebrated the Pilgrims’ first year’s harvest. Originally set by president Abraham Lincoln as the last Thursday of November, the holiday was changed by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939 to the fourth Thursday of November.

Actually, days of thanksgiving are far older than our American can celebration, which is an adaption of Lammas (Loaf Mass Day). In Britain, it was celebrated on August 1, when the wheat crop was good. In fact, most agricultural peoples have special days set aside to celebrate a good crop and the end of the harvest-usually referred to as the Harvest Home. Our modern Thanksgiving is a combination of two very different customs: toms: the harvest home feast and a formal day of thanksgiving proclaimed by community leaders to celebrate a victory.

It was during the Revolutionary War that the need for national holidays, rather than local holidays, developed. It was George Washington that first declared November 1, as a national day of thanksgiving. But regional traditions were too strong and the day never caught on. With the Industrial Revolution and hundreds of immigrants pouring into America, the need for a national day of thanksgiving was once more addressed. It was finally during the Civil War that President Lincoln, in an effort to unite the country, declared the last Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day. The holiday began with the usual morning ing church service, followed by a feast and then games.

Today we celebrate Thanksgiving with parades, the largest being Macy’s New York display, which began in 1927 with the appearance of Macy’s huge balloons designed by puppeteer Tony Sarg. The construction of the balloons is carefully executed by the Goodyear Aerospace Corporation, in Akron, Ohio. Preparations for the parade are year round, reaching a peak the day before Thanksgiving when the balloons arrive at 77th Street and Central Park West. They are removed from their crates and anchored with sand bags and giant nets. On Thanksgiving Day, more than 2000 of Macy’s employees arrive at 6 a.m. to march in the parade, which, 75 years later, is still the highlight of Thanksgiving Day.

 

About This Day, November 29th, Black Friday 2013

November 29th

Black Friday 2013

 

That the day after Thanksgiving is the “official” start of the holiday shopping season may be linked together with the idea of Santa Claus parades. Parades celebrating Thanksgiving often include an appearance by Santa at the end of the parade, with the idea that ‘Santa has arrived’ or ‘Santa is just around the corner’ because Christmas is always the next major holiday following Thanksgiving.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many Santa or Thanksgiving Day parades were sponsored by department stores. These include the Toronto Santa Claus Parade, in Canada, sponsored by Eaton’s, and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade sponsored by Macy’s. Department stores would use the parades to launch a big advertising push. Eventually it just became an unwritten rule that no store would try doing Christmas advertising before the parade was over. Therefore, the day after Thanksgiving became the day when the shopping season officially started.

Later on, the fact that this marked the official start of the shopping season led to controversy. In 1939, retail shops would have liked to have a longer shopping season, but no store wanted to break with tradition and be the one to start advertising before Thanksgiving. President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the date for Thanksgiving one week earlier, leading to much anger by the public who wound up having to change holiday plans. Some even refused the change, resulting in the U.S. citizens celebrating Thanksgiving on two separate days. Some started referring to the change as Franksgiving.

Approximate Day of Thanksgiving, November 24th

Approximate Day of Thanksgiving, November 24th

The American Thanksgiving Day began in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1621, and was celebrated the Pilgrims’ first year’s harvest. Originally set by President Abraham Lincoln as the last Thursday of November, the holiday was changed by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939 to the fourth Thursday of November.

Actually, days of thanksgiving are far older than our American celebration, which is an adaption of Lammas (Loaf Mass Day). In Britain, it was celebrated on August 1, when the wheat crop was good. In fact, most agricultural peoples have special days set aside to celebrate a good crop and the end of the harvest—usually referred to as the Harvest Home. Our modern Thanksgiving is a combination of two very different customs: the harvest home feast and a formal day of thanksgiving proclaimed by community leaders to celebrate a victory. It was during the Revolutionary War that the need for national holidays, rather than local holidays, developed. It was George Washington that first declared November 1, as a national day of thanksgiving. But regional traditions were too strong and the day never caught on. With the Industrial Revolution and hundred of immigrants pouring into America, the need for a national day of thanksgiving was once more addressed. It was finally during the Civil War that President Lincoln, in an effort to unite the country, declared the last Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day. The holiday began with the usual morning church service, followed by a feast and then games.

Today, we celebrate Thanksgiving with parades, the largest being Macy’s New York display, which began in 1927 with the appearance of Macy’s huge balloons designed by puppeteer Tony Sarg. The construction of the balloons is carefully executed by the Goodyear Aerospace Corporation in Akron, Ohio. Preparations for the parade are yearround, reaching a peak the day before Thanksgiving when the balloons arrive at 77th Street and Central Park West. They are removed from their crates and anchored with sand bags and giant nets. On Thanksgiving Day, more than 2000 of Macy’s employees arrive at 6 a.m. to march in the parade, which, 75 years later, is still the highlight of Thanksgiving Day.

December 7, 1941, A Day Which Will Live In Infamy

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On December 7, 1941, our Nation suffered one of the most devastating attacks
ever to befall the American people. In less than 2 hours, the bombs that rained
on Pearl Harbor robbed thousands of men, women, and children of their lives; in
little more than a day, our country was thrust into the greatest conflict the
world had ever known. We mark this anniversary by honoring the patriots who
perished more than seven decades ago, extending our thoughts and prayers to the
loved ones they left behind, and showing our gratitude to a generation of
service members who carried our Nation through some of the 20th century’s
darkest moments.

 

Presidential Proclamation — National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012

13 Trivial Facts About Friday the 13th

13 Trivial Facts About Friday the 13th

Updated: Friday, 13 Jan 2012, 11:26 AM EST
Published : Friday, 13 Jan 2012, 11:26 AM EST

(EndPlay Staff Reports) – It’s Friday the 13th. If you’re superstitious, you’re likely under the impression that this is the most unlucky day on the calendar. Here are 13 facts about Friday the 13th to help keep your mind off all bad things that could happen today:

1. This is the first of three Friday the 13ths on the calendar in 2012: January, April and July all start on Sunday, which means the 13th day falls on a Friday.

2. The 1980 film “Friday the 13th” grossed nearly $40 million during its initial cinema run, according to information from the Internet Movie Database .

3. Fear of the number 13 is known as triskaidekaphobia, while fear of Friday the 13th is known as paraskavedekatriaphobia.

4. According to information from Time , the mini crash of Friday, Oct. 13, 1989 was the second largest drop of the Dow history. Even scarier? Today the crash doesn’t even rank in the top 10.

5. One psychotherapist, who specializes in the treatment of phobias, asserts that 21 million Americans fear Friday the 13th, according to information from About.com .

6. People in Spanish-speaking nations fear Tuesday the 13th, according to information from The Huffington Post .

7. NASA was almost tragically unlucky with its Apollo 13 mission. The capsule was launched at 13:13 on April 11, 1970. The explosion that ultimately destroyed the craft took place on April 13, which was a Monday.

8. The ancient Chinese regarded the number 13 as lucky, according to About.com. The ancient Egyptians also thought 13 brought good luck.

9. Looking to get inked? Tattoo parlors around the country offer specials for those who chose to commemorate the day permanently, traditionally offering tats of the number 13 for only $13. According Tattoo Artist Magazine , Dallas tattoo artist Oliver Peck started the tradition.

10. President Franklin D. Roosevelt apparently suffered from triskaidekaphobia: According to The Huffington Post, he refused to travel on the 13th day of any month and would not host a dinner party with 13 guests.

11. Worried about being in an accident on Friday the 13th? According to a recent Washington Post report, the risk of being in a car crash on any Friday is higher than other days of the week. Police attribute this fact to alcohol consumption.

12. Some people believe the fear of Friday the 13th goes back to the Garden of Eden. Supposedly Eve offered Adam the forbidden fruit on a Friday, and they were then ejected from Paradise.

13. Want to avoid bad luck on Friday the 13th? There are a number of things you can do to ward off ill fate, according to superstition: Touch wood, cross your fingers, avoid black cats, don’t look at the full moon through a pane of glass, and throw salt over each shoulder.

My Fox Atlanta