Sun in Aquarius

wiccan

Sun in Aquarius

Eyes on the Future

The Dates: January 20th through February 19th

Keywords: original, Independent, progressive, pioneering, intellectual, compassionate, eccentric

The Shadow Side: dogmatic, stubborn, rigid, remote, detached, isolated

Quality and Element: Fixed and Air

People with Sun in Aquarius:
John Trudell, Rosa Parks, Galileo Galilei, Paul Newman, Elijah Wood, Christian Bale, James Dean, John Travolta, Vanessa Redgrave, Carson McCullers, Alice Walker, Abraham Lincoln, Jamie Walters, Matt Dillon, Geena Davis, Lewis Carroll, Evangeline Adams, Toni Morrison, Frederick Douglass, Guiseppe Verdi, Peter Gabriel, Bob Marley

Personality Profile:
The Sun in Aquarius has been called the “rebel” of the zodiac because of their total commitment to their unique vision. They’re uncompromisingly anchored in their own lives, and grant that same autonomy to others. This can make them seem detached and friendly at the same time, with an innate sense that everyone should “do their own thing.”

These are the ones with a faraway look, most likely thinking brilliant and futuristic thoughts. Their minds seem to roam the outer edges of what is possible, and many of them make the impossible a reality as pioneers in science and technology.

And their quirky, wholly original take on life gives them an edge should they venture into the Arts.
They’re tuned into a different frequency, and have a vast mindscape that seems to make them self-sufficient. In other words, they’re happy to spend time alone. Yet as a sign of paradoxes, the Aquarius is also drawn to groups and “communities.” They’re tuned into the undercurrents of gatherings and can help people act together toward a goal.

Solo Mia
The Aquarian nature is known as eccentric, but only because it follows that personal golden thread of inspiration to the limits. Another name for this could be genius, since it pushes out into the road less traveled and then goes yet further. While this leads to great achievement, there’s always a chance it can lead to feeling cut off from others — this is where the loner and “absent-minded professor” reputation comes into play.

The Aquarius remains a sovereign being that needs an intellectual rapport to sustain a romance.
An ideal mate inhabits a parallel universe with many loving thoughts and feelings transmitted from the other side of the bed. If you accept the physical and mental distances, you might just be surprised by how much love can grow in the space between.

Author
Molly Hall, Astrology Expert

Article Published on & owned by About. com

 

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Celebrating 365 Days of Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for November 24th – Thanksgiving (approximately)

autumn witch

November 24th

Thanksgiving (approximately)

 

The American Thanksgiving Day began in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1621, and celebrated the Pilgrims’ first year’s harvest. Originally set by president Abraham Lincoln as the last Thursday of November, the holiday was changed by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939 to the fourth Thursday of November.

Actually, days of thanksgiving are far older than our American can celebration, which is an adaption of Lammas (Loaf Mass Day). In Britain, it was celebrated on August 1, when the wheat crop was good. In fact, most agricultural peoples have special days set aside to celebrate a good crop and the end of the harvest-usually referred to as the Harvest Home. Our modern Thanksgiving is a combination of two very different customs: toms: the harvest home feast and a formal day of thanksgiving proclaimed by community leaders to celebrate a victory.

It was during the Revolutionary War that the need for national holidays, rather than local holidays, developed. It was George Washington that first declared November 1, as a national day of thanksgiving. But regional traditions were too strong and the day never caught on. With the Industrial Revolution and hundreds of immigrants pouring into America, the need for a national day of thanksgiving was once more addressed. It was finally during the Civil War that President Lincoln, in an effort to unite the country, declared the last Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day. The holiday began with the usual morning ing church service, followed by a feast and then games.

Today we celebrate Thanksgiving with parades, the largest being Macy’s New York display, which began in 1927 with the appearance of Macy’s huge balloons designed by puppeteer Tony Sarg. The construction of the balloons is carefully executed by the Goodyear Aerospace Corporation, in Akron, Ohio. Preparations for the parade are year round, reaching a peak the day before Thanksgiving when the balloons arrive at 77th Street and Central Park West. They are removed from their crates and anchored with sand bags and giant nets. On Thanksgiving Day, more than 2000 of Macy’s employees arrive at 6 a.m. to march in the parade, which, 75 years later, is still the highlight of Thanksgiving Day.

 

Daily Feng Shui Tip for Dec. 20th – ‘Mudd Day’

Today’s ‘Mudd Day’ actually commemorates the birth date of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who became notorious when he offered medical aid to John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. And while the spelling is different, I would like to use these energies to offer an easy recipe for a clarifying and toning facial mud mask that will keep you from getting your hands dirty like the doctor. The ingredients include one tablespoon of clay powder (available from health food stores), one egg yolk, one-half mashed avocado and a bit of witch hazel. Mix all ingredients together until the mud is a smooth texture. Apply for 20 minutes and rinse with lukewarm water. Pat dry and knock ’em dead.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’ for December 18th

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

There seems to be two important things to do in times of difficulty. One is to pray and the other to keep our sense of humor. The first is essential to make the basic correction and the other is necessary to balance the human spirit while things work out.

Without a sense of humor, we tend to become too serious about the personal self. It becomes all too important, too self-righteous, and far too self-centered.

At the first signs of trouble, we may want to find someone wiser in whom to confide and ask questions. And their advice may be most helpful, but it is still our own responsibility to get off our backs and do it with dignity and self-respect that will not lower our standards nor cause us embarrassment. And humor can help us do it.

There is humor in every situation if we can detach ourselves from the seriousness of it long enough to look for it. Abraham Lincoln knew the importance of his sense of humor and said, “With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.”

________________________________________

Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

Elder’s Meditation of the Day
By White Bison, Inc., an American Indian-owned nonprofit organization. Order their many products from their web site: http://www.whitebison.org

Approximate Day of Thanksgiving, November 24th

Approximate Day of Thanksgiving, November 24th

The American Thanksgiving Day began in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1621, and was celebrated the Pilgrims’ first year’s harvest. Originally set by President Abraham Lincoln as the last Thursday of November, the holiday was changed by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939 to the fourth Thursday of November.

Actually, days of thanksgiving are far older than our American celebration, which is an adaption of Lammas (Loaf Mass Day). In Britain, it was celebrated on August 1, when the wheat crop was good. In fact, most agricultural peoples have special days set aside to celebrate a good crop and the end of the harvest—usually referred to as the Harvest Home. Our modern Thanksgiving is a combination of two very different customs: the harvest home feast and a formal day of thanksgiving proclaimed by community leaders to celebrate a victory. It was during the Revolutionary War that the need for national holidays, rather than local holidays, developed. It was George Washington that first declared November 1, as a national day of thanksgiving. But regional traditions were too strong and the day never caught on. With the Industrial Revolution and hundred of immigrants pouring into America, the need for a national day of thanksgiving was once more addressed. It was finally during the Civil War that President Lincoln, in an effort to unite the country, declared the last Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day. The holiday began with the usual morning church service, followed by a feast and then games.

Today, we celebrate Thanksgiving with parades, the largest being Macy’s New York display, which began in 1927 with the appearance of Macy’s huge balloons designed by puppeteer Tony Sarg. The construction of the balloons is carefully executed by the Goodyear Aerospace Corporation in Akron, Ohio. Preparations for the parade are yearround, reaching a peak the day before Thanksgiving when the balloons arrive at 77th Street and Central Park West. They are removed from their crates and anchored with sand bags and giant nets. On Thanksgiving Day, more than 2000 of Macy’s employees arrive at 6 a.m. to march in the parade, which, 75 years later, is still the highlight of Thanksgiving Day.

Question of the Day, Please Participate If You Like!

Instead of a quiz today, I have a question for everybody. I would like as many as possible to participate. You know sort of start a conversation. Now here’s the question……

I was watching the History Channel last night. They were previewing a new show that is coming on. But in the commercial for it, the same question was asked again and again. So after about 4 times of seeing the commercial I got to thinking about the question. I actually gave it some serious thought (which is unusual for me, lol!). The question that kept reappearing was….

If you could go back in time and stop an event from happening (like 9/11, WWI, assassination of JFK), which event would you try to prevent?

My answer to the question came quickly to me. I would go back and prevent John Wilkins Booth from shooting Abraham Lincoln. I have always admired Lincoln and his life was cut way too short. I believe he would have probably been one of our greatest Presidents ever. He was President during some very turmoil times but his judgment was good and he did what he thought was right. But there is one thing that has always baffled me about Lincoln. He was so against slavery that he was willing to go to war to free all the slaves. But in reality he had slaves of his own. That never made a lick of sense to me, the President having slaves. Then I stop to think, Lincoln and I had some pretty similiar thoughts and ideas. I don’t believe in slavery and I don’t understand what was wrong with the people back then. Every man should be free and what our forefathers were thinking is beyond me. He believed in equality for everyone. In this country that should be a given. And most of all, he was willing to fight for an idea that he believed in. It is ashame the way he was killed. Shot from behind, only a coward does that. When Booth jumped to the stage he should have broken more than his leg. He should have broken his neck. If Lincoln had lived, there is no telling if this country would have been better off. But it sure could get any worse.

Now it’s your turn, what event would you stop?

This Day In History, Friday, April 27th

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A Timeline Of Events That Occurred On This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

April 27

1296   Edward I defeats the Scots at the Battle of Dunbar.
1509   Pope Julius II excommunicates the Italian state of Venice.
1565   The first Spanish settlement in Philippines is established in Cebu City.
1773   British Parliament passes the Tea Act.
1746   King George II wins the battle of Culloden.
1813   American forces capture York (present-day Toronto), the seat of government in Ontario.
1861   President Abraham Lincoln suspends the writ of habeas corpus.
1861   West Virginia secedes from Virginia after Virginia secedes from the Union.
1863   The Army of the Potomac begins marching on Chancellorsville.
1865   The Sultana, a steam-powered riverboat, catches fire and burns after one of its boilers explodes. At least 1,238 of the 2,031 passengers–mostly former Union POWs–are killed.
1909   The Sultan of Turkey, Abdul Hamid II, is overthrown.
1937   German bombers of the Condor Legion devastate Guernica, Spain.
1941   The Greek army capitulates to the invading Germans.
1950   South Africa passes the Group Areas Act, formally segregating races.
1961   The United Kingdom grants Sierra Leone independence.
1975   Saigon is encircled by North Vietnamese troops.
1978   The Afghanistan revolution begins.
1989   Protesting students take over Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China.
Born on April 27
1737   Edward Gibbon, historian (The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire).
1791   Samuel F.B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph and the code.
1822   Ulysses S. Grant, Union general during the American Civil War, 18th President of the United States (1869-1877).
1840   Edward Whymper, the first man to climb the Matterhorn.
1900   Walter Lantz, cartoonist, creator of Woody Woodpecker.
1904   Cecil Day-Lewis, Irish poet, father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis.
1927   Coretta Scott King, civil rights activist, wife of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Historynet.com

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’ for April 25th

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

There seems to be two important things to do in times of difficulty. One is to pray and the other to keep our sense of humor. The first is essential to make the basic correction and the other is necessary to balance the human spirit while things work out.

Without a sense of humor, we tend to become too serious about the personal self. It becomes all too important, too self-righteous, and far too self-centered.

At the first sign of trouble, we may want to find someone wiser in whom to confide and ask questions. And their advice may be most helpful, but it is still our own responsibility to get off our backs and do it with dignity and self-respect that will not lower our standards nor cause us embarrassment. And humor can help us do it.

There is humor in every situation if we can detach ourselves from the seriousness of it long enough to look for it. Abraham Lincoln knew the importance of his sense of humor and said, “With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.”

*<<<=-=>>>*<<<=-=>>>*<<<=-=>>>*<<<=-=>>>*

Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

Elder’s Meditation of the Day
By White Bison, Inc., an American Indian-owned nonprofit organization. Order their many products from their web site: http://www.whitebison.org

Ostara Traditions

Ostara Traditions

 

image Spring egg hunts have origins in many lands. Some think that the egg hunt was symbolic of our ancestors, who would search for birds nests in early Spring. The eggs in them provided much needed fresh protein to add to the diet after a long, lean winter. Of course, egg hunts also have origins in India and China, where they were tied to the Karmic belief that we must each find our own path in each new life. Egg hunts became popular in the United States thanks to Abraham Lincoln, who, in 1862, invited children form the Washington D.C. area to hunt for eggs on the White House lawn. This tradition continues even today.

 

 

image Eggs were buried by the Teutons to infuse the Earth with the life-giving properties of the egg. They were planted in fields, flower beds, window boxes and even animal barns for fertility. People would eat eggs in order to gain from the life-giving benefits of the egg.

 

 

image The Teutons believed it was very bad luck to wear your spring clothes before Ostara. They would secretly work all winter on beautiful new clothing for the Ostara celebration. This is where the tradition of having new, fancy clothes for Easter morning came from. It is also the origin of the ‘Easter parade’ to show off the new, beautiful clothing you now have.

Happy Presidents’ Day, All My Dear Friends!

Presidents Day Pictures, Images, Comments, Graphics
Good Morning to ya’! I hope the majority of my readers have the day off. I know not everyone can have the day off. We still need our gas stations, grocery stores and of course, our Dollar General Stores, lol! We call our Dollar Store, the West Paducah Wal-Mart, lol! I know it has definitely saved the trips to Wally world and town since it has been built. The poor country grocery store is about to go out of business. I told the friend at the Dollar Store if they would put in a meat counter, the grocery store would go under. But I would hate to see it go. It has been out here for over 50 years and has become a local landmark.

The Dollar Store and our local grocery was not what I was planning on writing about today. It just sort of happened, lol! I know I am getting older and now I take time to reflect on things that I use to not do. One of those things happens to be President’s Day. I know there has been oodles of Presidents but the one I think about in particular is Abraham Lincoln. Why I don’t know. Perhaps I was Mary Lincoln in a previous life, lol! He was a great man in a very turmoil time in our country’s history. The war was horrible o say the least. Can you imagine going out on a battlefield and across from you is your brother, father, neighbor or another acquaintance? I can’t. Then to think you were the President that had the sad duty of ordering the troops into war. President Lincoln must have had a lot on his mind and a very heavy heart. But he had a very noble cause and I believe if he had lived, he would have treated the South appropriately. I also believe he would have made us a better country. Unfortunately, we will never know, his life cut way to short. To think John Wilkes Booth thought he was going to be hailed as a hero. What on earth was wrong with that man’s thinking? It has been recorded that Booth killed Lincoln because he loved the South. He might have loved the South but I don’t believe the South loved him. The South had just signed a Peace Treaty calling for the end of the war. Then Booth kills Lincoln. I know papers were found that linked Booth to the Southern capital at the time. But I believe one of the Generals destroyed those papers. But I guess in history, John Wilkes Booths is a person I can say I truly loathe. In my opinion, he killed one of the greatest men that ever lived.

On this Presidents’ Day, there are numerous Presidents we can honor and admire. I am sure each of us has their own. But today, I am taking time out to honor President Abraham Lincoln. Take a moment to honor your favorite and say a little prayer for them.

Happy Presidents’ Day!