A Binding Spell

While this spell may sound gentle for a binding spell it will work and with the way it is worded the person casting it does not have to be concerned with bad things coming back on them. Always remember The Threefold Law when writing a spell or perform a ritual.

Burn or get rid of anything the person you are binding may have given you or a family member when at all possible before performing the spell. If you are doing the spell in a ritual the items may be disposed of them if you are burning them.

In the first, third, sixth, and eighth blanks fill in the person’s full name you wish to bind. In the second, fourth, fifth and seventh blanks fill in your name and all family members, you want covered in this spell. If a person is a junior or second or has some or some other suffix to their name be sure to add it.

In the second, fourth, fifth and seventh blanks fill in your name and all family members, you want covered in this spell. If a person is a junior or second or has some or some other suffix to their name be sure to add it.

I ask the universe to help _______ to find meaning, happiness, joy, peace and love in (his or her) life.

I ask these things fill her life so she no longer causes tension and strife in __________

As this is done with no harm intended to _______I ask she find excitement in her and her families lives

So he or she stays out of  _________ , their immediate and extended family’s lives.

I cast a shadow to cloak _________ extended and immediate family, whenever _____tries to pry into any of our lives.
The entire ______ family, want _______ out of their lives today, tomorrow and forever more

As I will it So mote it be!

Copyright 2015 Lady Beltane

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Today’s Quiz: A Quick Cat Quiz for Cat Lovers

Quick Cat Quiz for Cat Lovers

1. In ancient Egypt, when a household cat died, family members did  what to mourn the passing of their pussycat?

a. Shave their eyebrows

b. Henna tattoo the name of their cat across their hearts

c. Make offerings of cream to the cat goddess Bastet and beat their chests  while wailing

d. Burn catnip and frankincense in all of the doorways and leave offerings of  cream outside the front door

2. A cat is a digitigrade animal which means:

a. They vary in the number of toes they have

b. They are adept at climbing trees, but head-first only.

c. They have soft pads on the bottom of their feet which makes them near  silent in their movement

d. They walk on their toes

3. The technical term for a cat’s hairball is a:

a. Doozie

b. Bezoar

c. Furetto

d. Ailuro

4. In Catholicism, the Patron Saint of Cats is:

a. Saint Francis of Assis

b. Saint Gertrude of Nivelles

c.  Saint Garfield of Davis

d. Saint Catherine of Alexandria

5. Strings for guitars, fiddles, harps and tennis rackets once used catgut.  True or False?

6. Kitten litter-mates can have different fathers.  True or  False?

7. What is the largest recorded litter for one cat?

a. 10

b. 12

c. 16

d. 19

8. Which famous historical figure had a deep distaste for the  dirtiness of dogs, but loved cats so much that he reportedly cut the sleeve from  his robe to avoid disturbing his cat that fell asleep in his arms?

a. Winston Churchill

b. Prophet Mohammed

c. Buddha

d. St. Francis of Assisi

9. According to another well-loved legend, which famous historical  figure stroked their beloved cat three times, thus granting it — and all cats  thereafter — seven lives.

a. Prophet Mohammed

b. Buddha

c. King Tutankhamen (King Tut of Egypt)

d. Cleopatra

10. Catnip is exciting to some cats because:

a. It smells similar to a queen (adult female) in heat.

b. It is illegal in many states

c. It is chemically similar to hormones produced by a lactating mother  cat

d. It can trigger visual and olfactory hallucinations

 

11. Everyone knows cheetahs are the fastest land animal, but  which cat claims second place?

a. Clouded leopard

b. Amur leopard

c. Caracal

d. Serval

 

12. An ancient Chinese legend maintains that the cat is the  cross-breeding between which two animals?

a. Fox and a rabbit

b. Monkey and lioness

c. Monkey and an otter

d. Lioness and a weasel

 

The Answers

1. In ancient Egypt, when a household cat died, family members did what to  mourn the passing of their pussycat?

a. Shave their eyebrows

In ancient Egypt, cats were sacred and associated with the goddess Bastet.  Thus, when a family cat left the world of the living, family members would mourn  by shaving off their eyebrows, as well as, host elaborate funerals. The cat was  typically embalmed and buried in the family tomb or in a pet cemetery with a  wooden mask. To help the newly deceased cat pass to the world of the dead, tiny  mice mummies were often also buried with the beloved feline.

2. A cat is a digitigrade animal which means:

d. They walk on their toes

Like most fast mammals, cats walk and run on their toes.

3. The technical term for a cat’s hairball is a:

b. Bezoar

The term for hairballs in my household however is just plain gross.

4. In Catholicism, the Patron Saint of Cats is:

b. Saint Gertrude of Nivelles

5. Strings for guitars and tennis rackets once used catgut. True and False.

True because the term catgut was used to refer to musical instrument strings,  but false because the source of the string was not from the gut of cats. Rather,  the source of these strings were usually sheep, cow and goat intestines. The  term catgut may be a shortened version of cattle gut, but the etymology is not  entirely clear.

6. Kitten littermates can have different fathers.  True.

7. What is the largest recorded litter for one cat?

d. 19

A normal litter of kittens ranges from one to six kittens, although up to  nine is not uncommon. The largest known litter however was 19 kittens, of which  15 survived.

8. Which famous historical figure had a deep distaste for the dirtiness of  dogs but loved cats so much that he reportedly cut the sleeve from his robe to  avoid disturbing his cat that fell asleep in his arms?

b. Prophet Mohammed

The Prophet Mohammed, the founder of the Muslim religion, loved cats so much  that legend has it that he once cut  the sleeve from his robe to avoid disturbing his sleeping cat, Muezza. Indeed, Islamic tradition teaches their adherents that cats are to be  respected and loved and mistreating a cat is considered a serious sin.

9. According to another well-loved legend, which famous historical figure  stroked their beloved cat three times, thus granting it — and all cats  thereafter — seven lives.

a. Prophet Mohammed

According to legend, the multiple lives all started when Prophet Mohammed  granted his favorite cat, Muezza, seven lives and the ability to always land on  all four paws after a fall.

10. Catnip is exciting to some cats because:

a. It smells similar to a queen (adult female) in heat.

Catnip contains a chemical, transnepetalactone, that is very similar to the  substance secreted by a female cat in oeterous (in heat).  Combine  this fact with the fact that catnip is also closely related to marijuana and you  can see why some cats bliss-out when given this kitty treat! MEOW-ZA!

11. Everyone knows cheetahs are the fastest land animal, but which cat  claims second place?

d. serval

Second to the Cheetah in speed (60 mph), the serval reaches speeds of 45-50  mph.

12. An ancient Chinese legend maintains that the cat is the cross-breeding  between which two animals?

b. a monkey and lioness

Ancient Chinese legend maintains that the cat is the product of a lioness and  a monkey – the lioness endowing her offspring with dignity and the monkey with  curiosity and playfulness.

 

Let’s Talk Witch – How to Explain Your Beliefs

Let’s Talk Witch – How to Explain Your Beliefs

When describing your beliefs to someone, it’s not always necessary to explain everything. It’s best to start with your personal beliefs, and then to segue into a longer explanation. It also helps to make connections between Neo-Pagan practices and the practices of other religions. Finally, you should be prepared to allay fears people have about magic and those wild Pagan orgies.

Share the Basics

When first explaining your beliefs, stick to a skeleton of your basic belief system. For a coworker, it’s enough to say something like, “I follow a nature religion.” You can answer further questions if you want to, but try to steer clear of talk about working skyclad. With friends, you can explain your beliefs a little more deeply. It’s okay to mention the deities you follow, your holiday celebrations, or anything else that seems appropriate. Your friend may or may not ask questions. If she does, then explain further. For example, if you’re asked if you believe in God, you can answer that you believe in a god and goddess. If you are asked if you worship Satan, you can explain that Satan is a Christian construct and that you don’t worship anything that could be construed as evil.

Answer the Questions

Family members and people you have a romantic connection to will ask the most questions. Work slowly, starting from the basics. Allow the person time to digest your answers and then think of new questions. You might want to invite them to attend a ritual with you, or send them a copy of a ritual so they can see what it’s like.

You will most likely be asked if you still celebrate the holidays of your original faith. Many Pagans choose to celebrate Christmas as a secular holiday and share the day with family and friends, just as they did before, but without the trip to church. Most Jewish Pagans find that their traditions work very well with Neo-Paganism and are able to honor both the Jewish and Pagan holidays. You can also explain that you honor the cycles of the sun and earth, or adhere to a holiday calendar that predates Christianity. You can point out that many of these celebrations continue in the regions where they originated.

Some Christians don’t know that Christ’s actual birth date is unknown. Christmas was first moved to December 25 in the fourth century, and was later set by Pope Gregory. The new date coincided with Pagan celebrations of Saturnalia, the winter solstice, and the birth of the sun god Mithras.

If you are asked specifically what you do, then give a very basic rundown of an average ritual. You will most likely be asked if you use magic. If you do use magic, you can explain that you don’t practice black magic or sacrifice animals during your rituals (unless you’re Santerían). Magic can be likened to prayer because both are tools for asking the gods for help.

The tools, especially ritual knives, usually arouse the most curiosity. Explain as much of it as you feel comfortable with. For example, you could explain that your athame is a symbol of the element of fire because steel is forged from fire. You don’t need to get into its relation to male energy and the symbolic Great Rite unless you already explained Beltane.

Make Connections Between Religions

When explaining your faith, it also helps to make connections to more familiar religions and holidays. For example, you can liken the goddess to Mary, mother of Jesus Christ, whom many Pagans honor as a goddess. When asked about Yule, explain that you celebrate the return of the light in the form of the sun god, spelled Sun. You can point out that the Christmas tree, holiday wreaths, and decorations are all pre-Christian practices.

If you use other practices, such as shamanic journeying or meditation, compare your practices to those of Native Americans or Buddhists. Other practices, like wearing a Celtic Cross pendant or hanging a Witch Ball in your window for protection, can be related to the folk traditions of Europe and the British Isles.

Allay Fears

When people hear the words heathen, Pagan, and Witch, all sorts of scary images are conjured up. Your family members may worry that you’ve joined a cult or gone off the deep end. You should clarify that you are not a sorcerer or the Wicked Witch of the West. You should explain that Pagans have no single leader, you’re not required to give all your money to anyone, and there is no strict dogma, so it would be difficult for you to be a member of a Pagan cult.

 

If a friend or family member insists on trying to “save” you, gently but firmly explain that you believe differently, but you appreciate the concern. You might want to give him a copy of a beginner’s book on your chosen path or direct him to an explanatory Web site.

Once you’ve explained your personal beliefs, your friends and family members may be less worried but might still have a few concerns. You may be asked if you have orgies in the forest. Even if you do, that might not be the right thing to tell your mom. You might be asked if you hex people. Again answer with a simple “no,” unless you want to get into a long conversation about magical ethics.

The most common fear is that you’ll become a different person. Reassure them that you are the same person you always were, and you just have a different religion. Chances are you had Pagan leanings before you made the conversion, and once they recognize that, they will be better able to accept your religious choices.

 

Source:

“The Everything Paganism Book
How to Explain Your Beliefs
by Selene Silverwind
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Cosmic Tips to Conquer Holiday Family Stress

Cosmic Tips to Conquer Holiday Family Stress

See how Astrology can help you through the holidays!

Tarotcom Staff     Tarotcom Staff on the topics of thanksgiving, holidays, astrology

Let’s get real: Life is not a Norman Rockwell painting. When it comes to spending a lot of time with family during the holidays, the most wonderful time of the year can quickly turn into the most stressful time of the year.

Even the people we love the most have a unique way of pushing our buttons when we spend too much time together. Add that to the stress of juggling holiday parties, meal planning and gift shopping from Thanksgiving to New Year’s, and … well, let’s just say it’s easy to go from holly jolly to downright brawly in the blink of Santa’s eye.

Astrology can help you watch for the things that trigger your horoscope sign’s stress levels most. Here are some cosmic tips on how every zodiac sign can cope with stressful family situations all season long.

Aries (March 21 – April 19)

Even dynamic Rams can run out of energy during the holidays, and it stresses you out when you don’t have enough steam to get everything done. If a family member asks for one more thing on top of this, watch out for your fiery temper! Prevent a meltdown by setting aside at least one hour of alone time per day. Delegate some of your tasks to others and go for a walk or take a nap. You don’t have to do everything yourself — that’s what family is for!

Taurus (April 20 – May 20)

Taurus, you’re the peacemaker, and your family relies on you to solve disputes over the dinner table during the holidays. And you know what? That stresses you out! You don’t like to witness conflict or hurt feelings, and it’s even worse if you can’t help settle everyone down because then you feel like you’ve failed. If you find yourself stressed by family drama this year, use your stubborn nature to cope. Insist everyone calm down and speak respectfully, and don’t walk away until peace prevails.

Gemini (May 21 – June 20)

You don’t suffer fools gladly, Gemini. Your short temper can be triggered when a family member says something you disagree with, or if they move too slowly — like when Granny drives you to the mall in her 1987 Cutlass Ciera. You need to practice patience, dear Gemini. Take part in daily activities to calm your overactive mind, like yoga or an art class to, so you won’t blow a gasket at Thanksgiving dinner.

Cancer (June 21 – July 22)

Sensitive Cancer Crabs are especially prone to holiday family stress. You are very negatively affected by criticism, angry outbursts or being ignored. And it’s easy for certain family members to hurt your feelings unintentionally — like if one of your siblings seems to be getting preferential treatment, or if someone accidentally insults you with a nose trimmer as a holiday gift. To keep Crab from getting crabby, it’s important you speak up and let the offending family member know how you feel. Don’t keep your hurt feelings to yourself, or you’ll wind up nursing a stress-related ulcer. Take a deep breath and let your feelings be known, and more than likely you’ll find peace in an apology.

Leo (July 23 – Aug. 22)

Leo, you need to let go. Your stress triggers are primarily situations you can’t control, and that is an inevitable part of the holidays. One of your family members might break the gravy dish, you may lose your car in the mall parking garage on Black Friday, or Uncle Jerry might infer that your career choice falls short of family expectations. Whatever it is that takes place to trigger your insecurities and prompt you to throw a childish temper tantrum… Let. It. Go. You’ll be much happier that way.

Virgo (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22)

You think too much, Virgo — which accounts for your greatest holiday stress. Just the thought of getting all your holiday chores done and attending to every family member’s needs is enough to tie you in knots. But the thing is, once you actually start working on the things you need to get done, you’re fine. Make lots of lists to help keep you on track – write down what you can do to help others, too. You’ll feel calmer just putting it all on paper. Pretend you’re making a list for Santa, it’ll be fun!

Libra (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22)

Not being treated fairly is hugely stressful for you, Libra. And you also can’t deal with a lot of clutter. But during large family holiday gatherings, it’s easy for these needs to be neglected. If someone takes the last slice of pumpkin pie before you’ve had any, and then has the nerve to leave the dirty dish on the counter, look out! That will set you off, and you could waste hours weighing the pros and cons of confronting them about it. Rather than seething in silence or overreacting defensively, respond calmly in the moment. Keep it short and sweet — no long-winded speeches or accusations. You’ll get better results once people know where you stand.

Scorpio (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21)

Your family doesn’t realize how sensitive you are, Scorpio, because you hide it well. You have a quiet strength, so you’re easily stressed out by big noisy family gatherings. You also feel tense and nervous when you don’t get enough privacy, so be sure to let your family members know your needs and boundaries so you can negotiate what works for all. It may be as simple as going into a private room alone for an hour to regroup, or leaving a lit bit sooner than the rest of the clan. If you explain, they will understand.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21)

You’re all about movement, Sagittarius, so the idea of sitting in a relative’s living room for five hours straight is your personal hell. You’re also not big on formal family dinners where you must act properly and “behave.” Any situation that reins you in can trigger stress, like someone pressuring you to buy too many gifts or show up on time for dinner. Find ways to spend some time outdoors to feed your restless spirit. Help decorate the family home with outdoor lights or shovel snow from the sidewalks up and down the street so you won’t feel so constrained.

Capricorn (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19)

You demand a lot from yourself, Capricorn. And, you feel pressured when you fail to live up to your high expectations during the holidays. You worry worry worry about serving the right holiday dishes, buying the right gifts or telling the right jokes at the holiday dinner table. You can end up going over the “what ifs” or “if onlys” ’til you’re all lathered up. The remedy is to live in the moment, the only place where joy can be found. And, be sure there’s plenty of time to relax in your hectic holiday schedule.

Aquarius (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18)

Though “live and let live” is your motto, Aquarius, you really like to have your way. But when you’re surrounded by family members during the holidays, you need to learn the art of compromise. You don’t need to bend your will entirely to that of every family member, but do make more of an effort to accommodate their needs, too. You’re a little high-strung even when it’s not the holiday season, so trying to do so much traveling, partying, shopping and planning in so little time can stress you out right quick. Just slow down a little. Ironically, by slowing down you’ll actually get more done and feel more relaxed.

Pisces (Feb. 19 – March 20)

You’re a very private person, Pisces, so nosy family members or being put on the spot at a family gathering in which you feel exposed can be stressful. And you’re sensitive nature is also unnerved by loud family revelry, teasing and obnoxious behavior. You might become overly anxious in these family holiday situations because you don’t know how to shield yourself from such invasions. It’s difficult, but if you can give yourself a temporary attitude adjustment you’ll fare much better. Keep thinking “This too shall pass,” and take little escapes for an hour here and there so you get plenty of time alone to process your emotions and clear your slate.

How To Honor the Ancestors at Samhain

How To Honor the Ancestors at Samhain

By

Many Wiccans and Pagans choose Samhain as a night to honor their ancestors.

For many modern Pagans and Wiccans, there has been a resurgence of interest in our family histories. We want to know where we came from and whose blood runs through our veins. Although ancestor worship has traditionally been found more in Africa and Asia, many Pagans with European heritage are beginning to feel the call of their ancestry. This rite can be performed either by itself, or on the third night of Samhain, following the End of Harvest celebration and the Honoring of the Animals.

Here’s How:

  1. First, decorate your altar table — you may have already gotten it set up during the End of Harvest rite or for the Ritual for Animals. Decorate your altar with family photos and heirlooms. If you have a family tree chart, place that on there as well. Add postcards, flags, and other symbols of the country your ancestors came from. If you’re lucky enough to live near where your family members are buried, make a grave rubbing and add that as well. In this case, a cluttered altar is perfectly acceptable — after all, each of us is a blend of many different people and cultures.
  2. Have a meal standing by to eat with the ritual. Include lots of dark bread, apples, fall vegetables, and a jug of cider or wine. Set your dinner table, with a place for each family member, and one extra plate for the ancestors. You may want to bake some Soul Cakes.

    If your family has household guardians, include statues or masks of them on your altar. Finally, if a relative has died this year, place a candle for them on the altar. Light candles for other relatives, and as you do so, say the person’s name aloud. It’s a good idea to use tealights for this, particularly if you have a lot of relatives to honor.

     

  3. Once all the candles have been lit, the entire family should circle the altar. The oldest adult present leads the ritual. Say:

    This is the night when the gateway between our world and the spirit world is thinnest. Tonight is a night to call out those who came before us. Tonight we honor our ancestors. Spirits of our ancestors, we call to you, and we welcome you to join us for this night. We know you watch over us always, protecting us and guiding us, and tonight we thank you. We invite you to join us and share our meal.

  4. The oldest family member then serves everyone else a helping of whatever dishes have been prepared, except for the wine or cider. A serving of each food goes on the ancestors’ plate before the other family members recieve it. During the meal, share stories of ancestors who are no longer among the living — this is the time to remember Grandpa’s war stories he told you as a child, tell about  when Aunt Millie used salt instead of sugar in the cake, or reminisce about summers spent at the family homestead in the mountains.
  5. When everyone has finished eating, clear away all the dishes, except for the ancestors’ plate. Pour the cider or wine in a cup, and pass it around the circle (it should end at the ancestor’s place). As each person recieves the cup, they recite their genealogy, like so:

    I am Susan, daughter of Joyce, the daughter of Malcolm, son of Jonathan…

    and so forth. Feel free to add in place names if you like, but be sure to include at least one generation that is deceased. For younger family members, you may wish to have them only recite back to their grandparents, just because otherwise they can get confused.

  6. Go back as many generations as you can, or (in the case of people who have done a lot of genealogy research) as many as you can remember. You may be able to trace your family back to William the Conqueror, but that doesn’t mean you have it memorized. After each person recites their ancestry, they drink from the cider cup and pass it to the next person.
  7. A quick note here — many people are adopted. If you are one them, you are fortunate enough to be able to choose whether you wish to honor your adoptive family, your biological family, or a combination of the two. If you don’t know the names of your birth parents or their ancestry, there’s nothing wrong with saying, “Daughter of a family unknown.” It’s entirely up to you. The spirits of your ancestors know who you are, even if you don’t know them yet.
  8. After the cup has made its way around the table, place it in front of the ancestors’ plate. This time, a younger person in the family takes over, saying:

    This is the cup of remembrance. We remember all of you. You are dead but never forgotten, and you live on within us. 

    Take some time to meditate on the value of family, how fortunate we are to be able to know the connections of kin and clan, and the value of heritage. If your family has a tradition of music or folktales, share those as a way to wrap up the ritual. Otherwise, allow the candles to burn out on their own. Leave the plate and cup on the altar overnight.

Tips:

  1. If you didn’t do a separate ritual for animals, you can add photos and candles for deceased pets to your family altar.
  2. If you like, you may wish to follow this ritual with a Seance.

What You Need

  • Items to represent your family members
  • A meal to eat
  • A cup of cider or wine to drink
  • Candles