The Witches Digest for Tuesday, October 17th (Part 2, The Witches Guide to Tuesdays)

 

The Witches Digest for Tuesday, October 17th

(Part 2, The Witches Guide to Tuesdays)

Today is Tuesday, October 17th

Tuesday is dedicated to the powers of the planet Mars, personified in Ares, Tiwaz, Tiw, Tuisco and Tyr. Tuesday rules controlled power, energy and endurance.

Deity: Tiwaz

Zodiac Sign: Aries

Planet: Mars

Tree: Holly

Herb: Plantain

Stone: Agate

Animal: Crab

Element: Fire

Color: White

Number: 2

Rune: Tyr (T)

 

Celtic Tree Month of Gort(Ivy) – September 30 – October 27

Runic Half-Month of Wyn(joy) – October 13 – October 27

Goddess of the Month of Hathor – October 3 – October 30

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick

On Tuesday, October 17th, We Honor the Goddess Caillech

Caillech

The goddess known as Cailleach in Scotland and parts of Ireland is the embodiment of the dark mother, the harvest goddess, the hag or crone entity. She appears in the late fall, as the earth is dying, and is known as a bringer of storms. She is typically portrayed as a one-eyed old woman with bad teeth and matted hair. Mythologist Joseph Campbell says that in Scotland, she is known as Cailleach Bheur, while along the Irish coast she appears as Cailleach Beare.

 

Her name is varied, depending on the county and region in which she appears.

 

According to The Etymological Dictionary Of Scottish-Gaelic the word cailleach itself means “veiled one” or “old woman”. In some stories, she appears to a hero as a hideous old woman, and when he is kind to her, she turns into a lovely young woman who rewards him for his good deeds. In other stories, she turns into a giant gray boulder at the end of winter, and remains this way until Beltane, when she springs back to life.

 

Shee-Eire, a website dedicated to Irish folklore and legend, says, “The Cailleach Beara is ever-renewing and passes through many lifetimes going from old age to youth in a cyclic fashion. She is reputed to have had at least fifty foster children during her ‘lives’. Her grandchildren and great-grandchildren formed the tribes of Kerry and it’s surroundings. The Book of Lecan (c.1400 a.d.) claims that the Cailleach Beara was the goddess of the Corcu Duibne people from the Kerry region.

 

In Scotland the Cailleach Bheur serves a similar purpose as the personification of Winter; she has a blue face, and is born old at Samhain … but grows ever younger over time until she is a beautiful maiden at Bealtaine.”

 

Cailleach rules the dark half of the year, while her young and fresh counterpart, Brighid or Bride, is the queen of the summer months.

 

She is sometimes portrayed riding on the back of a speeding wolf, bearing a hammer or a wand made of human flesh.

 

Interestingly, even though Cailleach is typically depicted as a destroyer goddess, she is also known for her ability to create new life. With her magical hammer, she is said to have created mountain ranges, lochs, and cairns all over Scotland. She is also known as a protector of wild animals, in particular, the deer and the wolf, according to the Carmina Gadelica.

 

Blogger and artist Thalia Took says, “The Caillagh ny Groamagh (“Gloomy Old Woman”, also called the Caillagh ny Gueshag, “Old Woman of the Spells”) of the Isle of Man is a winter and storm spirit whose actions on the 1st of February are said to foretell the year’s weather–if it is a nice day, She will come out into the sun, which brings bad luck for the year. The Cailleach Uragaig, of the Isle of Colonsay in Scotland, is also a winter spirit who holds a young woman captive, away from her lover.”

 

In some Irish counties, Cailleach is a goddess of sovereignty, who offers kings the ability to rule their lands. In this aspect, she is similar to the Morrighan, another destroyer goddess of Celtic myth.

 

If you’d like to honor the Cailleach as the year grows cold and dark, author Patricia Telesco recommends, in her book 365 Goddess: A Daily Guide to the Magic and Inspiration of the Goddess, trying the following on a cold wintery day: “Since this Goddess is one of cold honesty, wear something blue today to encourage personal reserve, control, and truth with yourself throughout the day…

 

In the morning, cover your altar or a table with a yellow cloth (maybe a napkin or placemat) to represent the sun. Place a blue candle in a central location on the table, along with a bowl of snow to represent Cailleach Bheur and winter. As the candle burns with the light of the sun, the wax shrinks and this Goddess’s snows melt, giving away once more to the power of warmth and light. Keep the remnant was and re-melt it for any spells in which you need a cooler head. Pour the water from the snow outside to rejoin the Goddess.”

Author

Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Tuesday’s Magick

Courage
Binding
Protection
Achievement
Power
Initiation
Protection
Passion

Planet: Mars

Colors: Red, Orange

Crystal: Garnet, Ruby

Incense: Myrrh, Ginger, Cardamom

Plant: Cardamom

The Magickal Day of Tuesday

Named for the Norse god Tyr, who was a deity of heroism and combat, Tuesday is a very martial sort of day – color associations include bright red and oranges, as well as warrior-like metals such as iron and steel.

The ancient Romans called this day Martis, after the warrior god Mars – other deities associated with Tuesday include Ares, the Morrighan, and other gods of battle and glory. Red gemstones like rubies and garnets come into play on Tuesdays, as do herbs and plants such as thistles, holly, coneflowers and cacti – you’ll notice these are all sharp, prickly plants!

One of the interesting – and more than a little amusing – aspects of Tuesday magic is that in addition to war and conflict against your enemies, this is a day also associated with marriage. You can also use this day of the week for magical workings connected to protection and initiation. Use Tuesday to assert yourself, make a mark and stake your claims

Source

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article originally published on & owned by ThoughtCo.

The Witches Guide to Tuesday

 

Tuesday is the day to work any magick that falls in the category of increasing strength, courage, bravery, and passion. All of these intense emotions are linked to this day’s energies, and spells designed around these themes will have extra punch when performed on this magickal day

So, let’s add a little passion and conviction into your life! Break out the daring red pieces of your wardrobe, and put a little pizzazz into your day. Work with Lilith, and see what she has to teach you about personal power and sexuality. Meditate onTiw/Tyr and Mars, and see what those ancient warrior gods will show you about new tactics, strategies, and claiming personal victories in your life. Practice conjuring up that astral weapon from the meditation and use it wisely for protection and for courage.

Create a philter for courage and protection or handcraft your own Witch’s jar to remove negativity from your home. See what other Witch crafts you can conjure up with Tuesday’s magick. Create some kitchen magick on this Tuesday by whipping up a spicy stew-add in a few Mars-associated ingredients such as carrots, peppers, and garlic. Empower the stew for success, and then treat yourself and your family to a good, hearty meal. Try working with a little aromatherapy and burn some spicy or coffee-scented candles to increase your energy level.

Check the sky at night, and see if you can find the reddish planet Mars up in the heavens. Not sure where to look? Check an astronomy magazine or search the Web for more information. Become a magickal warrior and move forward in your life with strength, courage, and compassion. Embrace the side of yourself that loves a good challenge and that is passionate and daring! Banish fear, and face your future with strength and conviction. Believe in yourself and in your dreams, work hard, and you will win every time.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

The Witches Almanac for Tuesday, October 17th

Dessalines Day (Haitian)

Waning Moon

Moon Phase: Fourth Quarter

Moon Sign: Virgo

Moon enters Libra 1:35pm

Incense: Cedar

Color: White

Correspondences for Tuesday, October 17th

Tuesday (Tiw’s-day)

Planet: Mars

Colors: Red and Autumn Shades

Crystals: Bloodstone, Ruby, Garnet, Flint, Rhodonite, Iron and Steel

Aroma: Basil, Ginger, Black Pepper, Mars Oil, Dragon’s blood and patchouli

Herb: Basil

The day of Mars. This day could only ever symbolize the sheer power of the god of war! The ideal spells to be cast on this day are that of force, power war and protection.

Dedicated to the powers of the planet Mars, personified as Ares, Tiwaz, Tiw, and Tyr.

Magical aspects: controlled power, energy, and endurance, passion, sex, courage, aggression, and protection.

This is the proper day of the week to perform spells and rituals involving courage, physical strength, revenge, military honors, surgery, the breaking of negative spells, dynamic energy, matrimony, war, enemies, prison, hunting, politics, contests, protection, victory, and athletics.

 

Tuesday Is Ruled By Mars

Tuesday is a Mars day, and just like the god of war, this is the time to tap into magicks to call for strength and courage. This day of the week is for rebels and warriors. If you are facing a challenge of any kind, need a boost to your courage, or want to enhance your passions, Tuesday is the day of the week for you. Some suggestions for Tuesday enchantments would include:

*Wearing the fiery colors associated with this day: scarlet, red, black, and orange. Don some of the more daring and bewitching colors of your wardrobe on Tuesdays and turn a few heads.

*Carrying a bloodstone in your pocket or wearing garnet-studded jewelry to reinforce your convictions

*Working with protective and fire-associated plants such as the snapdragon, thistle, and holly to boost your shields and bravery

*Burning spicy-scented energy-enhancing candles to add a little magical aromatherapy to your home

*Cooking up a hearty meal featuring carrots, peppers, and garlic (all Mars foods and spices) to empower yourself for victory and success

The Energy of Mars

Weekday ruled by Mars: Tuesday

Stones:
Bloodstone
Garnet
Carnelian
Pink Tourmaline

Herbs and Plants:
Red Rose
Cock’ comb
Mugwort
Mullien
Nettle
Thistle
Wormwood

Magickal Intention: Courage, physical strength, revenge, military honors, surgery, breaking negative cycles, war, viltality, Assertiveness.

The Witches Magick for Tuesday, October 17th – Bast Protection Spell

You will need the following items for this spell:

Red cat candle (love)
Green cat candle (financial )
Black cat candle (enemies or hexes(to break or cause)
Oils(catnip, sage, black cats oil) all optional

 

Meditate upon your problem visualize Bast protecting you from the problem. If you are sweating a hex/curse visualize Bast harming that person but it must be justified unless you are capable of powerful dark spells

 

Charge the candle dress it if you wish but charge the candle it helps, then light the candle meditate upon its flame before chanting:

 

Bast protect me and(state what you want protected if not continue)that I now find myself in
Trouble protect me now with all your roaring might!
Strike down the evil that lies near slash and bite do what you must
Protect me now do not abandon me, I do ask
Keep me safe and sane do not let me fall
I ask of thee
So mote it be

 

Feel Bast power flow all around you jumping and striking the danger when done see her land on her feet and hear a mighty lions roar (if you want roar to affirming your victory) Then see Bast change to a lovely cat cute but powerful see her wake to you then see her curl on you lap see her golden silvery aura create a force field around you and whatever you want protected

The Age Old Question: Are Green-Skinned Witch Decorations Offensive?

 

A reader asks, “I’m not sure if I’m overreacting or not. Every year at Halloween, there are green, ugly, warty witches everywhere and my son keeps asking me to buy one. I don’t want him to think that witches are ugly – after all, his mommy is a witch – but it seems like it’s all over the place at Halloween. On the other hand, I know it’s meant in the spirit of fun and silliness, and I don’t want to make a big deal out of something that’s small. How can I figure out a way to talk to my son about the stereotypes of the ugly witches, without making him feel bad about liking silly decorations? Should I even be offended about this?

 

You know, I see this come up periodically each fall as the Samhain season rolls in. First of all, understand that it’s not up to me or anyone else to tell you how sensitive or offended you should or shouldn’t be about anything. That’s a matter of personal choice.

 

People tend to fall into different camps on this topic. There’s one group that flat out believes that green, ugly witches at Halloween are just as offensive as caricatures of Jewish people or African Americans, and we should just stamp all of it out, because it promotes intolerance and bigotry. There’s another group of people that recognizes that it’s meant in fun, and that everyone knows witches aren’t really green and hideous, so it’s perfectly okay. Like you, a lot of folks are somewhere in the middle – it may be bothersome, but it’s not deliberately intended to offend people who are practicing witches.

 

For me personally, I’m not troubled by the green witch decorations – and yes, a full disclaimer here, I own a nine-foot inflatable green witch in a purple dress, and I’m not ashamed to admit it, because I think she’s hilarious (she does tend to drunkenly fall over during high winds, though).

 

I’m also not offended – again, this is my own personal experience and opinion – by the green witch décor, because I know that my own skin is quite lovely, and not the least bit green. Because of that, it’s hard for me to get upset about this. Now, just because I’m not bothered by it doesn’t mean that other people can’t or shouldn’t be; I’m simply stating my own experience here.

 

I’m certainly never going to tell anyone that they have no right to be offended by something.

 

The first documented imagery of a witch with green skin isn’t in any sort of ancient esoteric text – in fact, it comes to us from Margaret Hamilton’s portrayal of the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz. While the Wicked Witch is definitely an unpleasant sort in that film, author Gregory Maguire puts a completely different spin on the same character, in his novel Wicked. The stage version of Wicked shows a young Elphaba – she who would later become the Wicked Witch of the West – as a sympathetic character. As played by Idina Menzel and a number of other accomplished performers, Elphaba is anything but hideous.

 

Here’s what I would suggest – and there are a couple of different responses you can use, depending on whether you’re one of our readers who is bothered by the green witch thing, or whether you’re not:

 

If you find green ugly witches to be stereotypical and offensive, here’s a conversation you might have with your child: Some people like green witches, but I don’t, and here’s why. Mommy is a witch, and I’m not green or ugly. When people hang up those green ugly witches, it bothers me, because it says something about witches that isn’t true.

 

If you don’t really care much about the decorations with the ugly, warty witches, then tailor your approach likewise: Well, I’m not bothered by those, because I’m a witch and I’m not green/ugly/warty, so if you’d like to have one hanging up as a decoration, that’s totally fine.

 

It’s also important to keep a couple of other aspects of this issue in mind. First, remember that while some people interpret the green witch stereotype as a slam against their religious beliefs, the vast majority of non-Pagan people don’t typically think of witchcraft as a religion at all, so it’s rooted more in ignorance than in willful maliciousness. And even among practicing witches, there are different interpretations as to whether witchcraft itself is a religion, or whether it’s merely a skill set that is utilized within a spiritual context.

 

Second, keep in mind that not all of the green witch images are ugly – consider the aforementioned Elphaba, for instance. Angelina Jolie looks pretty hot as Maleficent (although she doesn’t appear to be green all the time – perhaps it’s just the lighting?), and every year at Samhain there are memes that come out with some decidedly sexy witches who happen to be green-skinned.

 

The bottom line is it’s your home, so you get to decide what Halloween/Samhain decorations you’d like to have. If your son wants a green witch and you’re not bothered by it, go for it. If you feel like it promotes negative stereotypes, choose some other décor instead.

Source

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article originally published on & owned by ThoughtCo.

Samhain Ritual to Honor Animals

This ceremony is designed to honor the spirits of the animals – both wild and domestic. Man’s relationship with animals goes back thousands and thousands of years. They have been a source of food and clothing. They have protected us from the things that lurk in the darkness. They have provided comfort and warmth. In some cases, they have even raised and nurtured our discarded children, as in the case of Romulus and Remus.

 

If you have animals in your home — pets or livestock — this is their night. Feed them before you feed the humans in your family. Put some food out for any wild animals that may happen by as well.

 

If you have a pet that has passed away during this last year, you may want to include a photo or keepsake of them on your table during this rite.

 

Prepare a stew for your family that includes small amounts of as many different meats as you may have available — beef, pork, game, chicken, etc. If your family is vegetarian or vegan, designate a non-meat ingredient to represent each animal and adapt the ritual as needed, eliminating lines that reference the eating of animals. When your stew is ready, gather the family around the altar table you prepared during the previous night’s Harvest End Ritual.

 

Place the stew pot in the center of the table, with a large serving spoon or ladle. Make sure you have some good dark bread to eat as well.

 

Each member of the family should have a bowl and spoon handy. Say:

 

Samhain has come, and it is the end of the Harvest.
The crops are in from the fields,
And the animals are preparing for the coming winter.
Tonight, we honor the animals in our lives.
Some have died that we may eat.
Some have provided us with love.
Some have protected us from that which would do us harm.
Tonight, we thank them all.

 

Go around the family in a circle. Each person should take a scoop of stew from the pot and place it in their bowl. Younger children may need an adult’s help with this. As each person gets their helping, say:

 

Blessed are the animals,
Those who die that we may eat.
Blessed are the animals,
Those we love and who love us in return. As the Wheel of the Year continues to turn,
The harvest has ended, and the grain has been threshed.
The animals sleep for the winter.
We thank them for their gifts.

 

Take your time finishing your meal. If you have pets, don’t be surprised if they come visit while you’re eating your stew tonight — animals tend to be very aware of the spiritual plane! If there is any stew left over, leave some out for the spirits. Any extra bread can be thrown outside for the wild animals and birds.

 

Tips:

If you want to mix a bit of stew in with your pet’s everyday food, it’s a good idea to check with your veterinarian first.

 

Source

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article originally published on & owned by ThoughtCo.

“The symbolism of this Sabbat is that of The Third (and final) Harvest, it marks the end of Summer, the beginning of Winter. It is a time marked by death when the Dead are honored – a time to celebrate and “study” the Dark Mysteries. “Samhain” means “End of Summer”. Its historical origin is The Feast of the Dead in Celtic lands. It is believed that on this night, the veil Between the Worlds is at its thinnest point, making this an excellent time to communicate with the Other Side. Symbols for representing this Sabbat may include Jack-O-Lanterns, Balefires, Masks, The Besom (Magickal Broom), The Cauldron, and the Waning Moon. Altar decorations might include small jack-o-lanterns, foods from the harvest, and photographs of your loved ones who have departed from this world. Appropriate Deities for Samhain include all Crone Goddesses, and the Dying God or the “Dead” God. Samhain Goddesses include Hecate, Hel, Inanna, Macha, Mari, Psyche, Ishtar, Lilith, The Morrigu/Morrigan, Rhiannon, and Cerridwen. Key actions to keep in mind during this time in the Wheel of the Year include return, change, reflection, endings and beginnings, and honoring the Dead. Other meanings behind this Sabbat celebration include the Wisdom of the Crone, the Death of the God, and the Celebration of Reincarnation.”

– Samhain Lore

And we are off again…..

Well we were!

Up Next, The Witches Digest for Tuesday, October 17th

(Part 3, Horoscopes & Other Daily Divination)

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