The Witches Digest for Monday, October 16th (Part 2, The Witches Guide To Mondays)

 

The Witches Digest for Monday, October 16th

(Part 2, The Witches Guide to Mondays)

Today is Monday, October 16th

 

Monday is the sacred day of the moon, personified as the goddesses Selene, Luna, and Mani. The moon is ruler of flow, affecting the changeable and impressionable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, then the powers of the moon are at their most potent.

Deity: Mani

Zodiac Sign: Cancer

Planet: Moon

Tree: Willow

Herb: Chickweed

Stone: Agate

Animal: Crab

Element: Water

Color: Green

Rune: Lagu (L)

 

Celtic Tree Month of Gort(Ivy) – September 30 – October 27

Runic Half-Month of Wyn(joy) – October 13 – October 27

Goddess of the Month of Hathor – October 3 – October 30

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick

On Monday, October 16th, We Honor the Goddess Ereshkigal

 

Areas of Influence: Ereshkigal was the Sumerian Goddess of Attalu, the land of the dead and ancestral memories.

She ruled this land alone passing laws and judgment upon the deceased. Later she fell in love with Nergal who was sent with offerings of food during a feast.

As only the dead were able to stay in Attalu he had to return home. Ereshkigal was so upset by his departure that she threatened the king of the Gods that she would bring all of the dead back to life. Nergal was permitted to return and they ruled the underworld together.

Another Sumerian myth tells the story of her sister Inanna’s visit into the underworld. The Goddess is not pleased to see her as she fears she has come to take over her Kingdom. She turns her into a corpse but is eventually she is forced to release her. For more information on this myth please go to the page listed for Inanna.

Some scholar’s suggest that this Goddess represents another aspect of Inanna as they both symbolize the changing of the seasons.

Origins and Genealogy: This Goddess is said to be Inanna’s elder sister her parents were Nammu and Na

Strengths: Not intimidated by other Gods and Goddesses.

Weaknesses: Jealous of her sister’s beauty.

 

Ereshkigal’s Symbolism

The Burney Relief is said by some archeologists to represent this Goddess. In this sculpture she is shown as a naked winged Goddess standing on a lion with owls flanking her sides.

She is also depicted as a big dark haired Goddess who sleeps naked in a palace made of lapis lazuli.

Sacred Animals: Lions and owls.

Sacred Crystals: Lapis lazuli.

 

Ereshkigal’s Archetype

The Crone: Ereshkigal is a classic example of a Crone Goddess, she is fierce and uncompromising and rules over the land of the dead.

In the Pagan tradition the Goddess is often split into three to depict the different stages of a woman’s life: mother, maiden and Crone.

The Crone represents the wise old woman whose child bearing days are behind her. Other associations with this Archetype include: compassion, transformation, healing and bawdiness death and endings. She is the respected older woman or grand parent at the heart of family who enjoys life and sharing her experience.

Unfortunately the word Crone or Hag often has negative connotations as many wise woman and midwives were persecuted as witches in the middle ages.

Shadow Crone is the bitter, old woman who has failed to learn from her life. She blames all her failings and unhappiness on a society that no longer respects the elders. As a result she becomes increasingly isolated and fearful.

 

Working with the Crone Archetype

The Crone: The Crone maybe one of your archetypes if you have gained wisdom, learning from your mistakes and showing a willingness to adapt to changing circumstances.

You are experiencing the Crone’s shadow if you have become rigid in your beliefs and have become stuck in a rut having lost all ability to let those areas of your life go that no longer serve you.

Source

Goddess-Guide.com

Monday’s Conjuring

 

Monday – is associated with the Moon

Candle colors – white or gray

Spellwork for Mondays – Crossroads work to learn to read cards, dealing with family matters, Protection, Truth, Peace, Justice

 

—Old Style Conjure Wisdoms, Workings and Remedies
Starr Casas

The Magickal Day of Mondays

 

Monday is the day of the moon itself, and it’s a day that’s connected to lunar colors like silver, white, or even a pale blue. Metals and gemstones like silver, pearl, opal and moonstone all come into play today.

There are plenty of deities associated with the moon – Thoth and Diana for instance – and herbal correspondences include many members of the mint family. Utilize wintergreen or peppermint, as well as catnip, comfrey, sage and chamomile in your workings.

When it comes to Monday magic, because of that lunar connection, it’s a good time to focus on workings related to childbearing and family life, purity and virginity, healing, wisdom, and intuition. Do a little bit of self exploration and work on developing your intuition – learn to trust your gut. Celebrate birth and life, and make some magic to fix what is broken.

Author

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by ThoughtCo

The Witches Guide to Monday

Think for a moment on all of the witchery, magick and enchantments that you have discovered. Don’t be afraid to adjust spells to suit your own specific needs. Any gentle, illusory, and dreamy charms and spells can be enhanced when you work on the day of the week that is dedicated to the moon. Mondays are a fantastic day to boost your psychic abilities and to tune in to your intuition and empathy. It also gives you the opportunity to work with a different lunar phase each and every Monday, which means in one month you could work four different types of moon magicks on Mondays. How’s that for adding to your repertoire? You are going to have mad skills in no time at all.

 

So light up those lunar scented candles and add a little mystique to your outfit by wearing an enchanting lunar color. Wear your sparkling silver jewelry and maybe add a pair of dangling silver earrings or a pendant shaped like a crescent moon. Create lunar potions and philters; make a dream catcher and give it as a gift to someone you love. Burn some sandalwood or jasmine-scented incense today to inspire the glamour and magick of the moon. Slice up a favorite variety of fruit that is in season for a snack or share it with your love and enjoy his or her lunar and romantic qualities. Brew up a cup of chamomile tea, enchant it with a little moon magick, and relax and get a good night’s sleep.

 

Most importantly, get outside tonight and watch the moon for a while. What phase is she in? What color was the moon as she rose? Why not start a journal and write down at what location the moon rises and sets for a few seasons? This is a great way to teach you to tune in and to become more aware of the moon and the influence that she pulls into our lives. Try calling on Selene for her magickal assistance, and call Thoth for wisdom and strength. Get to know the Norse Mani and the Latvian Meness. These gods of the moon have plenty to teach, and if you allow their influence to cycle through your life, you’ll receive many blessings. Be imaginative, and create your own personal lunar magick and witchery. Go on….the moonlight becomes you.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

Monday’s Witchery

Monday is named after the moon. The Latin term for Monday is Dies Lunae (“moon’s day”); in the Old English language, this day was Monandaeg; in Greek, it was Hermera Selenes. All of these different names and languages translate to the same thing: the “day of the moon.”

Working with the different phases of the moon is an important skill that takes a bit of time for Witches to learn. So why not cut to the chase and experiment with the day of the week that is dedicated to the moon in all of its magickal energies and aspects?

Magickally, Monday encourages the lunar energies of inspiration, illusion, prophetic dreams, emotions, psychic abilities, travel, women’s mysteries, and fertility.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

The Witches Almanac for Monday, October 16th

The Lion Sermon (British)

Waning Moon

Moon Phase: Fourth Quarter

Moon Sign: Virgo

Incense: Neroli

Color: Silver

The Magick of the Fourth Quarter

(From the waning half moon until the dark of the moon.)

This is the dark time of the moon. You may find that your psychic talents take a little vacation during the dark phases of the moon, or, on the other hand, they may come roaring to life with an all-out bombardment on your senses. Personally, I have found that abilities such as empathy and psychometry are more pronounced at this time. Why, you may wonder? Well, I have found that this type of psychic ability forces you to look within and to be still as the information comes to you— what better time than in the waning moon, when your powers are focused internally? Magickally, now is the occasion to tackle serious issues, such as extreme protection magick, bindings, or banishings, and keeping away criminals, prowlers, or stalkers. Casting your spells in the final days of the moon’s cycle (when the moon is not visible at all) will increase the force behind your banishing and protective magick. This phase of the moon is often linked to the darker aspects of the Goddess, when she is a spiritual warrior; again, Hecate is a good one to work with in this phase, but you can also call on Sekhmet, the Morrigan, or even Kali, if you are really feeling brave.

Source

Natural Witchery: Intuitive, Personal & Practical Magick
Ellen Dugan

Correspondences for Monday, October 16th

Day: Monday ( Moon-day)

Planet: Moon

Colors: Silver and White and Grey

Crystals: Moonstone, Pearl, Aquamarine, Silver, Selenite

Aroma: Jasmine, Lemon, Sandalwood, Moon Oil, African violet, Honeysuckle, Myrtle, Willow, and Wormwood

Herb: Moonwart

The sacred day of the Moon, personified by such goddesses as Selene, Luna, Diana, and Artemis. The Moon is ruler of flow affecting the changeable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, its powers are at their most potent.

Magical aspects: peace, sleep, healing, compassion, friendships, psychic awareness, purification, and fertility

Monday is ruled by the moon – an ancient symbol of mystery and peace. Monday is a special day for mothers as the cycle of the moon has long been associated with the female menstrual cycle. Those wishing to conceive a baby would be wise to try on a Monday as the magic of motherhood is strong and pregnancy is in the air.

This is the proper day of the week to perform spells and rituals involving agriculture, animals, female fertility, messages, reconciliation’s, theft, voyages, dreams, emotions, clairvoyance, home, family, medicine, cooking, personality, merchandising, psychic work, Faerie magic, and Goddess rituals

Monday Is Ruled By the Moon

This day of the week is dedicated to the moon and all of her magic and mystery. Mondays are for women’s mysteries, illusion, prophetic dreaming, emotions, travel, and fertility.

Some suggestions for Monday enchantments would include:

*Getting outside and looking for the moon in the heavens. Sit under her light and absorb a little glamour. Call on the moon goddess Selene for practical help in magical issues.

*Invoking the god Thoth for wisdom and insight

*Empowering your silver jewelry under the light of the moon. Wear moonstone or pearl jewelry today to add a lunar and magical shimmer to your outfit. Be mysterious and subtle and wear moon-associated colors such as white, silver, and blue.

*Working spells for safe travel with a simple moonstone

*Gathering bluebells, jasmine, gardenias, or white roses to create a little garden witchery with the flowers that are associated with the moon

*Setting up a lunar Tarot spell today to increase your psychic powers

*Eating a lunar fruit such as a melon to be healthy, serene, and at peace

*Br ewing up a cup of chamomile or mint tea and enchanting it for sweet dreams and restful sleep

The More You Know – Samhain

“Everything that we know about the religious festivals of the pagan Anglo-Saxons comes from a book written by the Christian monk, the Venerable Bede, entitled De temporum ratione, meaning The Reckoning of Time, in which he described the calendar of the year. The pagan Anglo-Saxons followed a calendar with twelve lunar months, with the occasional year having thirteen months so that the lunar and solar alignment could be corrected. Bede claimed that the greatest pagan festival was Modraniht (meaning Mother Night), which was situated at the Winter solstice and which marked the start of the Anglo-Saxon year. Following this festival, in the month of Solmonað (February), Bede claims that the pagans offered cakes to their deities. Then, in Eostur-monath Aprilis (April), a spring festival was celebrated, dedicated to the goddess Eostre, and the later Christian festival of Easter took its name from this month and its goddess. The month of September was known as Halegmonath, meaning Holy Month, which may indicate that it had special religious significance. The month of November was known as Blod-Monath, meaning Blood Month, and was commemorated with animal sacrifice, both in offering to the gods, and also likely to gather a source of food to be stored over the winter. Remarking on Bede’s account of the Anglo-Saxon year, the historian Brian Branston noted that they “show us a people who of necessity fitted closely into the pattern of the changing year, who were of the earth and what grows in it” and that they were “in fact, a people who were in a symbiotic relationship with mother earth and father sky”.”

– Anglo-Saxon Polytheism

What is the Summerland?

In some modern magical traditions, it is believed that the dead cross over into a place called the Summerland. This is a predominantly Wiccan and NeoWiccan concept, and is not typically found in non-Wiccan Pagan traditions. While there may be a similar concept of the afterlife in those traditions, the word Summerland seems to be generally Wiccan in its use.

Wiccan author Scott Cunningham described the Summerland as a place where the soul goes on to live forever.

In Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner, he says, “This realm is neither in heaven nor the underworld. It simply is — a non-physical reality much less dense than ours. Some Wiccan traditions describe it as a land of eternal summer, with grassy fields and sweet flowing rivers, perhaps the Earth before the advent of humans. Others see it vaguely as a realm without forms, where energy swirls coexist with the greatest energies – the Goddess and God in their celestial identities.”

A Pennsylvania Wiccan who asked to be identified as Shadow says, “The Summerland is the great crossover. It’s not good, it’s not bad, it’s just a place we go where there is no more pain or suffering. We wait there until it is time for our souls to return in another physical body, and then we can move on to our next lifetime. Some souls may be finished incarnating, and they stay in the Summerland to guide newly arriving souls through the transition.”

In his book The Pagan Family, Ceisiwr Serith points out that belief in the Summerland – or reincarnation, or Tir na nOg, or ancestor rites – are all part of the Pagan acceptance of the physical state of death. He says these philosophies “help both the living and the dead, and that is enough to justify them.”

Does the Summerland Really Exist?

We get a lot of emails here at About Paganism asking if the Summerland is a real place, that really and truly exists. That’s one of those great existential questions that’s simply impossible to answer. Just like our Christian friends may believe heaven is real, it can’t be proven. Likewise, there’s no way to prove the existence of a metaphysical concept like the Summerland – or of Valhalla, or of reincarnation, and so forth. We can believe, but we can’t prove it in any way, shape, or form.

Wiccan author Ray Buckland says in Wicca for Life, “Summerland is, as we might expect, a beautiful place. What we know of it is what we have gleaned from people who have returned from near-death experiences, and from accounts obtained by genuine mediums who communicate with the dead.”

Most reconstructionist paths do not adhere to the notion of the Summerland – it seems to be a uniquely Wiccan ideology. Even among Wiccan paths who accept the concept of the Summerland, there are varying interpretations as to what the Summerland actually is. Like many aspects of modern Wicca, how you view the afterlife will depend on the teachings of your particular tradition.

There are certainly other variations of the idea of life after death among various religions.

Christians believe in heaven and hell, many Norse Pagans believe in Valhalla, and the ancient Romans believes that warriors went to the Elysian Fields, while ordinary people went to the Plain of Asphodel. For those Pagans who don’t have a defined name or description of the afterlife, there is still typically a notion that the spirit and the soul live on somewhere, even if we don’t know where it is or what to call it.

Source

Patti Wigington, Author
Published on ThoughtCo

Pagans and Death

For many modern Pagans, there is a somewhat different philosophy on death and dying than what is seen in the non-Pagan community. While our non-Pagans see death as an ending, some Pagans view it as a beginning of the next phase of our existence. Perhaps it is because we view the cycle of birth and life and death and rebirth as something magical and spiritual, a never ending, ever turning wheel. Rather than being disconnected from death and dying, we tend to acknowledge it as part of a sacred evolution.

In The Pagan Book of Living and Dying, author Starhawk says, “Imagine if we truly understood that decay is the matrix of fertility… we might view our own aging with less fear and distaste, and greet death with sadness, certainly, but without terror.”

As the Pagan population ages – and certainly, we are doing so – it’s becoming more and more likely that at some point each of us will have to bid farewell to a fellow Pagan, Heathen, Druid, or other member of our community. When that happens, what is the appropriate response? What can be done to honor the person’s beliefs and send them on their way in a way that they themselves would have valued, while still managing to maintain sensitivity in dealing with their non-Pagan family members and friends?
Views of the Afterlife

Many Pagans believe that there is some sort of afterlife, although that tends to take varying forms, depending on the individual belief system. Some followers of NeoWiccan paths accept the afterlife as the Summerland, which Wiccan author Scott Cunningham described as a place where the soul goes on to live forever. In Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner, he says, “This realm is neither in heaven nor the underworld. It simply is — a non-physical reality much less dense than ours. Some Wiccan traditions describe it as a land of eternal summer, with grassy fields and sweet flowing rivers, perhaps the Earth before the advent of humans. Others see it vaguely as a realm without forms, where energy swirls coexist with the greatest energies – the Goddess and God in their celestial identities.”

Members of non-Wiccan groups, particularly those who follow a more Reconstructionist slant, may see the afterlife as Valhalla or Fólkvangr, for those who adhere to a Norse belief system, or Tir na nOg, for individuals who participate in a Celtic path. Hellenic Pagans may see the afterlife as Hades.

For those Pagans who don’t have a defined name or description of the afterlife, there is still typically a notion that the spirit and the soul live on somewhere, even if we don’t know where it is or what to call it.

Tawsha is a Pagan in Indiana who follows an eclectic path. She says, “I don’t know what happens to us when we die, but I like the idea of the Summerland. It seems peaceful, a place where our souls can regenerate before they reincarnate into a new body. But my husband is a Druid, and his beliefs are different and focus more on the Celtic view of the afterlife, which seems a little more ethereal to me. I think it’s really all just different interpretations of the same place.”

Source

Patti Wigington, Author
Published on ThoughtCo

A Pagan Blessing for the Dead

Choose four participants. One carries a rock, representing the earth, and stands to the North. One carries a feather, representing Air, and stands to the East. Another stands to the South, carrying a candle or some incense to represent Fire. A fourth can hold a cup of Water to the West — if you’re fortunate enough to hold your ritual near an ocean or river, use that to represent Water. On your altar, in the center of the circle, place a picture or some other memento of the person you are saying goodbye to.

Form a circle, and call upon the elements. Invite the powers of the four directions to come watch over you. Stand in the center and say:

Take me now, take me now
for to face the Summerlands*.
By the earth and wind and the fire and rain
I’m on my way,remember me.

Turn to the North and say:

Take me now back to the earth
from which we spring and then return.
I shall cross over, now it is my turn.
I am not afraid Remember me.

Repeat this verse, turning to each of the four directions. Substitute the different elements where appropriate.

Finally, touch each family member with your athame as you say the following:

Blood of my blood
Bone of my bone
Flesh of my flesh
Keep my soul alive
I will live on
Within your hearts
I am not afraid
Remember me

If you have ashes for the deceased, you may wish to scatter them at this time. Take a moment to reflect on the good memories you have of your departed friend or family member.

*If your particular tradition believes we go to some other place after death, feel free to substitute the appropriate place name for “Summerlands.” If you’re not sure where we end up, you can simply say “the other side.”

Source

Patti Wigington, Author
Published on ThoughtCo

“Come now together. Join hands and share with us the understanding of death and rebirth; be as a tree which spreads its roots in the earth, and its branches to the heavens, standing witness to eternal transformation. For death is not a wall against which all thought and all consciousness must cease, but a door, a door to new life, to wonder, and to enchantment. …Be still now and look within, with closed eyes. Feel…feel. Feel the earth beneath your feet , feel the roots of your being re-connect with the earth, with the Mother. And as you do, your mind relaxes, your body relaxes, with each breath you take. Breathe deeply, gently, and imagine to yourself a leaf, full of life, as it fades and transforms, to fall and float gently downward, into a flowing stream. In your mind’s eye of imagination, see it float effortlessly, down and down the stream of life….See it reach the sea, the vastness of infinity. See it sink gently beneath the waves, gradually releasing its form to become one with the infinite. Whence it came, thence it returns, to feed and nourish new forms, new life, new consciousness, Thus the cycle continues eternal, no thing truly lost, all things truly one. …And now, open your eyes; feel the warmth, the love and the light of those around you. Let us now begin the ancient rite. Call ye now the powers of the Lord and the Lady, invoke the Force with ourselves and know that that which can be desired can be manifested. Call ye now and be reborn …”

– Two Samhain Rituals, Compost Coveners, 1980

Rolling Right Along….

The Witches Digest for October 16th

(Part 3, Horoscopes & Divination)

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