Sugar Cane-Bamboo Leaf Cleansing Spell

This Brazilian formula utilizes dried pulverized bamboo leaves, which are common in Brazil but may be purchased from herb supply stores elsewhere.

  1. Place the bamboo leaves into a mortar together with some sugar cane and grind them together.
  2. Burn the herbs, wafting the fragrance as needed.

If necessary, substitute granulated brown sugar for the sugar cane, however, it’s not exactly the same. You may wish to add a few drops of dark rum in addition, but be aware that rum is extremely flammable and the flames may shoot up higher than is normally the case with incense.

Advertisements

Sacred Purification Incense

This cleansing formula incorporates the herbs most frequently be used in sacred rites. It removes the negative and the tainted, leaving an aura of holiness behind.

Benzoin
Dragon’s blood
Frankincense
Myrrh’Sandalwood
Sea Salt
  1. Blend and grind the ingredients into a fine powder.
  2. Sprinkle onto a lit charcoal and burn.

WOTC’s Spell of the Day for 3/26 – Lucky Charm Bracelet Spell

Lucky Charm Bracelet Spell

Charm bracelets go in and out of fashion but their roots derive from magickal use, manipulating the secret powers of objects. Lucky charms may be understood as a form of amulet, talisman, or ex-voto.

  1. Choose a charm that represents your goal.

  2. At the New Moon place the charm beside a small pink candle.

  3. Charge the candle with your desire, carve and dress if you like and burn it.

  4. When the candle burns out, attach the charm to a bracelet.

  5. Wear it or reserve in a safe place, whatever suits your magick.

  6. When the goal is achieved, set another goal.

  7. Choose another charm and begin again. (Should you reconsider and change your mind regarding any goal, merely remove that charm and begin again at the next New Moon.)

Incense of the Day for 3/26 is Moonfire Incense

Moonfire Incense

1 part Rose
1 part Orris
1 part Bay
1 part Juniper
1 part Dragon’s Blood
1/2 part Potassium Nitrate

Burn for divination, love and harmony. The potassium nitrate is included in this incense to make it sparkle and glow. If you add too much it will explode!

                                  The Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews
                                                        Scott Cunningham

Gemstone of the Day for 3/26 is Aquamarine

 

Gemstone of the Day

Aquamarine – a symbol of beauty, honesty, and loyalty.

<!–

Stone’s names:–>Color: Aquamarines are found in a range of blue shades, from the palest pastel to greenish-blue to a deep blue. While the choice of color is largely a matter of taste, the deeper blue gems are more rare. Aquamarine is a pastel gemstone, and while color can be quite intense in larger gemstones, the smaller Aquamarines are often less vivid.

Description: Be3Al3(SiO3)6 Aquamarine is pale greenish blue or bluish green variety of beryl. Beryl is a mineral composed of beryllium aluminum silicate, a commercial source of beryllium. It has long been of interest because several varieties are valued as gemstones. These are aquamarine, emerald and heliodor. Aquamarine is the most common variety of gem beryl, it occurs in pegmatite, in which it forms much larger and clearer crystals than emerald.

The name’s origin: Aquamarine name is derived from Latin words meaning sea and water, therefore name “aquamarine” means sea water.

Birthstone: Aquamarine along with bloodstone are birthstones of Pisces (Fish): Feb. 19 – March 20.

Wedding anniversary: Aquamarine is the anniversary gemstone for the 16th and 19th year of marriage.
<!–
Varieties:
–>
Care and treatment: As with all gemstones, care should be taken to protect aquamarine from scratches and sharp blows. Keep aquamarine jewelry in the dark place, as it often becomes paler if left out in the sun. Clean your Aquamarine in ultrasonic jewelry cleaner or with warm, soapy water and a soft bristle brush.
<!–
From the stone history:
–>
Shopping guide: Aquamarine is a beautiful affordable gemstone found in a range of blue shades. The highest quality aquamarine is transparent. Aquamarine is a hard gemstone making it a good choice for jewelry that is worn frequently like aquamarine rings. However due to its delicate color and clarity it is best displayed in a more prominent position such as in earrings and pendants.
A nice, medium dark blue aquamarine is a perfect gift for any occasion, but especialy for weddings, as aquamarine is a symbol of beauty, honesty, and loyalty. When buying aquamarine jewelry for yourself, note that wearring aquamarine in earrings brings love and affection.
In its finest color aquamarine will be a rather dark blue, rivaling a nice medium blue <!––>sapphire. But they are rare and expensive. Be ware far too many blue topaz have been sold as aquamarines, as blue topaz is much cheaper.
For many years aquamarine is a favorite of many consumers.

Healing ability: Aquamarine works against nerve pain, glandular problems, toothache, and disorders of the neck, jaw and throat. It strengthens liver and kidneys. Aquamarine diminishes problems with eyes, ears and stomach, relieves cough. Moreover, aquamarine protects from perils of the sea, including seasickness. It is said to help ease depression and grief.

Mystical power: Aquamarine has a soothing effect on “just married” couples, assisting them in working out their differences and insuring a long and happy marriage. Aquamarine is said to re-awaken love in long-married couples and signify the making of new friends.
It also provides courage and strengthens the will. Aquamarine protects against the wiles of the devil. Others say that the Aquamarine is an excellent stone for meditation.

Deposits: Aquamarine is found in Brazil, India, Russia (Ural mountains) and USA (Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut, North Carolina, Colorado and Vermont). Aquamarines are mined in a number of exotic places including Nigeria, Madagascar, Zambia, Pakistan and Mozambique. Brazil is the source of the finest aquamarines.

Herb of the Day for 3/26 is Mountain Flax

Flax, Mountain

Botanical: Linum catharticum (LINN.)
Family: N.O. Linaceae

—Synonyms—Purging Flax. Dwarf Flax. Fairy Flax. Mill Mountain.
—Part Used—Whole Herb.

Mountain Flax is a pretty little herb, which grows profusely in hilly pastures.

—Description—It is an annual, with a small, thready root, which sends up several slender, smooth, straight stems, which rise to a height of 6 to 8 inches, and are sometimes branched towards the upper part. The leaves are small, linear-oblong and obtuse, the lower ones opposite, and the upper alternate. The flowers, 1/3 to 1/4 of an inch in diameter, are white. The plant at first glance much resembles chickweed, being glaucous and glabrous.

—Part Used—The whole herb is used mediinally, both fresh and dried, collected in July, when in flower, in the wild state.

—Constituents—A green, bitter resin and a neutral, colourless, crystalline principle of a persistently bitter taste, called Linin, to which the herb owes its activity.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—This herb was highly extolled by Gerard as a purgative. It operates chiefly as a gentle cathartic, and is useful in all cases where a brisk purgative is required. As a laxative, it is preferred to senna, though the action is very similar. It is generally taken combined with a carminative, such as peppermint.

The dried herb has been found very useful in muscular rheumatism and catarrhal affections, the infusion of 1 oz. in a pint of boiling water being taken in wineglassful doses. In liver complaints and jaundice, it has been employed with benefit.