Thursday – Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

Wiccan
Thursday

Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

The name is derived from Old English and Middle English Thursday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretatio romana.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar- var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi—referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”. In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Thursday

Magick Circle
Thursday

Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

The name is derived from Old English and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretation romance.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi.

This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar- var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi—referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”. In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Thursday

Thursday

Thor’s (Jupiter’s) day

The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretatio romana.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter (♃Jupiter) is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar – var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi – referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”.[5] In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal (Nahuatl pronunciation: [teskat͡ɬipoˈtoːnaɬ]) meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Thursday – Thor’s day


Thursday – Thor’s day

 

Thursday is the fourth day of the week between Wednesday and Friday, and is named after Thor, the hammer-wielding Norse god of thunder.

Necklace pendant shaped like Thor’s hammer Mjölnir.

Silver pendant shaped like Thor’s hammer.

Thursday is the fourth day of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601 and between Wednesday and Friday.

Naming Thursday – Thor’s Day
The English word Thursday is named after the Norse god of thunder, Thor. Thursday literally means “Thor’s day” in Old English. Thor is represented riding a chariot drawn by goats and wielding the hammer.
In most languages with Latin origins, the day is named after the god and planet Jupiter. Jupiter is depicted as the chief god of sky and thunder who maintained his power with his thunderbolt.

Middle English – thursday or thuresday
Old Norse– thorsdagr – Thor’s day
Old English– thunresdæg – Thunder’s day
Latin – dies Jovis – “Day of Jupiter”
Ancient Greek – hemera Dios – “day of Zeus”

Position in the Week
Thursday is the fourth day of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601. It is the fifth day of the week in countries that use the Sunday as the first day of the week in their calendar.
In Slavic languages and in Chinese, Thursday is the fourth day, while the Greeks and Portuguese refer to Thursday as the fifth day.

Common Events on Thursday
In the United Kingdom, all general elections have been held on a Thursday since 1935, and this has become a tradition, although not a requirement of the law. The Thursday before Easter is also known as Maundy Thursday or Sheer Thursday in the United Kingdom, which is traditionally a day of cleaning and giving out Maundy money.

In the United States, Thanksgiving Day is an annual festival celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November.
In Australia, most movie premieres occur on Thursdays and on Thursday nights. Most Australians are paid either weekly or fortnightly on a Thursday, so most shopping malls are generally open until 9pm, which is later than other weekdays. Shopping malls see this as a good opportunity for business to stay open longer than usual because most pay checks are cleared by Thursday morning.

 

Source:
timeanddate.com

 

Thursday

Vintage, winter, forest with wolves // Winter Collection Blingee

Thursday

Thor’s (Jupiter’s) day

The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretatio romana.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter (♃Jupiter) is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar – var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi – referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”.[5] In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal (Nahuatl pronunciation: [teskat͡ɬipoˈtoːnaɬ]) meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

 
Wikipedia

Thursday

wiccan woman

Thursday

Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

⦁ Middle English – thursday or thuresday
⦁ Old Norse– thorsdagr – Thor’s day
⦁ Old English– thunresdæg – Thunder’s day
⦁ Latin – dies Jovis – “Day of Jupiter”
⦁ Ancient Greek – hemera Dios – “day of Zeus”

The name is derived from Old English and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretation romance.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi.

This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar- var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi—referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”. In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Thursday

Your Nest

Thursday

Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

The name is derived from Old English and Middle English Thursday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretatio romana.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar- var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi—referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”. In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Thursday

Love Spell

Thursday

Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

⦁ Middle English – thursday or thuresday
⦁ Old Norse– thorsdagr – Thor’s day
⦁ Old English– thunresdæg – Thunder’s day
⦁ Latin – dies Jovis – “Day of Jupiter”
⦁ Ancient Greek – hemera Dios – “day of Zeus”

The name is derived from Old English and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretation romance.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi.

This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar- var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi—referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”. In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Thursday

Celtic Woman

Thursday

Jupiter’s (Thor’s) day

The name is derived from Old English and Middle English Thursday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the name of the Germanic god of thunder, Thunraz, equivalent to Jupiter in the interpretatio romana.

In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god Jupiter, who was the god of sky and thunder. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, “Jupiter’s Day”. In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.

The astrological and astronomical sign of the planet Jupiter is sometimes used to represent Thursday.

Since the Roman god Jupiter was identified with Thunor (Norse Thor in northern Europe), most Germanic languages name the day after this god: Torsdag in Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, Hósdagur/Tórsdagur in Faroese, Donnerstag in German or Donderdag in Dutch. Finnish and Northern Sami, both non-Germanic (Uralic) languages, uses the borrowing “Torstai” and “Duorastat”. In the extinct Polabian Slavic language, it was perundan, Perun being the Slavic equivalent of Thor.

There are a number of modern names imitating the naming of Thursday after an equivalent of “Jupiter” in local tradition. In most of the languages of India, the word for Thursday is Guruvar- var meaning day and guru being the style for Bṛhaspati, guru to the gods and regent of the planet Jupiter. In Thai, the word is Wan Pharuehatsabodi—referring to the Hindu deity Bṛhaspati, also associated with Jupiter. En was an old Illyrian deity and in his honor in the Albanian language Thursday is called “Enjte”. In the Nahuatl language, Thursday is Tezcatlipotōnal meaning “day of Tezcatlipoca”.

Today Is Wednesday – Woden’s Day

Today Is Wednesday – Woden’s Day

“Wodanesdag” (Germanic)
“Wodensdag” (Old English)
“Othinnsdagr” ( Old Norse)
“Onsdag” (Danish)
“Wednesday” (English)

Odin/Woden is the Norse God of magic, battle fury, protection, inspiration, shaman ecstasy, consciousness and communication.

If men can accept their female side as Odin/Woden did, women can surely accept their male side. This day is the “hump day” or “half past the week day.” It is a day of balancing physically, mentally and spiritually.

You can accept Odin/Woden as the All-father and the Omnipotent God when you realize that he became more balanced by accepting the intuitiveness, emotions, sensitivity and the wisdom of women. He also considered Frija/Frigg as his equal and consulted her on all important matters. Her advise always weighed heavily in his decisions. Women in Norse mythology, although not as much is written about them as men, were considered equal with men in property, warring, and decisions. Romanization (getting conquered by the Romans) changed the status of women later on. We are still healing from the effects of the Romanization!

The Rune of choice for this day is Ethel (OE), Othala (G), or Othal (ON). This Rune represents the hearth, the home, justice and honoring our ancestors.

Today Is Tuesday – Tiw’s Day

Today Is Tuesday – Tiw’s Day

“Tiw’s Day” or “Tyrsdagar” in Old Norse (Tuesday) represents spirit of justice discipline and integrity

Although, Tiw, Tyr, Tiwaz was a Sky God of war and battle. He is also the God of justice. When all else failed, you would want him on your side in battle because to have him on your side inevitably meant victory.

The Rune to use on this day is the arrow that points straight up, referred to as Tiw0 (OE), Tyr (ON), or Tiwaz (G). When things are not going exactly your way or you are still dragging from the weekend, remember that this Rune can be used in positive situations for the good of all concerned. It is a powerful Rune and should be used wisely. It enables you to have a good positive outlook in general and encourages well-being and good health. When the copier fails, machinery breaks down or the car will not start use the Rune Tiw!

Today is Monday – Moon’s Day, Manidagar

Today is Monday – Moon’s Day, Manidagar

Monday, “Moon’s Day” governs the emotions, wildlife, fertility and the life giving waters. In some traditions, the Moon may be attributed to a God or Goddess.

“Moon’s Day” or “Manidagar” as it is known in Old Norse governs the emotions, wildlife, and the giving waters. This day honors the God/dess, the moon cycles, the tides, and our feelings. This is a good day to honor the God/dess within. This Rune is called Lagu (OE), Laguz (G), or Logr (ON).

Many God/dess orientated Study Groups and Meta- physical Groups often meet on Mondays. It is good day to organize and plan for the rest of the week as well. IN THE NORSE AND GERMANIC TRADITIONS, THE MOON IS ALWAYS MASCULINE! In Norse, the Moon is “Mani.” Mani’s sister is Sol, the Sun. Sol is pursued by a wolf and Mani is pursued by Hati, who will catch him at Ragnorok and devour him. This is why the wolf is called Managarmr ‘devourer of Mani.’

This can also be a day of creativity drawing upon ones imagination and also a day of psychic awareness

Today is Thursday, Thor’s Day

Today is Thursday, Thor’s Day

“Thor’s Day” or “Thorsdagar” in Old Norse (Thursday), was named for a huge and hearty Norse God who was a defender against the world of chaos with his hammer, referred to as Mjollnir, the Destroyer.

Thor’s hammer was said to be made of stone and to have fallen from the heavens as a meteorite. Ancient alchemists believed there were two kinds of meteorites: Glass and the Irons. Moldavite, which is an extraterrestrial kind of peridot, is just one of many kinds of Glass meteorites that reach the Earth’s surface. The other kind of meteorite, The Irons, includes metals such as copper, nickel and iron. It was thought the Mjollnir was an iron and nickel alloy meteorite forged by Sindri the dwarf, an alchemist and smith of magical and mysterious metals.

Thor’s hammer obeyed his every command doing his bidding and returning to his hand once thrown. Thor commanded the thunderbolts, and could sling them at his foes. Known as a Storm God, Thor was easily irritated. He would roar like thunder and sling thunderbolts when angered. On the other hand, he could be benevolent and a strong friend to peasants and yeoman bringing rain when needed, stilling a storm, and above all as their protector and defender.

A Rune to use on this day is Thurisaz (Germanic), Thuith (Gothic), Thorn (Old English), Thurse (Old Norse). A real thorn can be tiny, but irritating. Problems may appear bigger than they really are. Thorn helps to put them in perspective, especially when an important decision must be made. The advice of what was needed can result in a very successful outcome. Problems and fears can then be encountered as creative challenges. Ask for advice and help when needed, especially on this day!

Today Is Wednesday, Woden’s Day

Today Is Wednesday, Woden’s Day

 

“Wodanesdag” (Germanic)
“Wodensdag” (Old English)
“Othinnsdagr” ( Old Norse)
“Onsdag” (Danish)
“Wednesday” (English)

Odin/Woden is the Norse God of magic, battle fury, protection, inspiration, shaman ecstasy, consciousness and communication.

If men can accept their female side as Odin/Woden did, women can surely accept their male side. This day is the “hump day” or “half past the week day.” It is a day of balancing physically, mentally and spiritually.

You can accept Odin/Woden as the All-father and the Omnipotent God when you realize that he became more balanced by accepting the intuitiveness, emotions, sensitivity and the wisdom of women. He also considered Frija/Frigg as his equal and consulted her on all important matters. Her advise always weighed heavily in his decisions. Women in Norse mythology, although not as much is written about them as men, were considered equal with men in property, warring, and decisions. Romanization (getting conquered by the Romans) changed the status of women later on. We are still healing from the effects of the Romanization!

The Rune of choice for this day is Ethel (OE), Othala (G), or Othal (ON). This Rune represents the hearth, the home, justice and honoring our ancestors.

Today is Moon’s Day – “Moon’s Day” Manidagar

Today is Moon’s Day – “Moon’s Day” Manidagar

Monday, “Moon’s Day” governs the emotions, wildlife, fertility and the life giving waters. In some traditions, the Moon may be attributed to a God or Goddess.

“Moon’s Day” or “Manidagar” as it is known in Old Norse governs the emotions, wildlife, and the giving waters. This day honors the God/dess, the moon cycles, the tides, and our feelings. This is a good day to honor the God/dess within. This Rune is called Lagu (OE), Laguz (G), or Logr (ON).

Many God/dess orientated Study Groups and Meta- physical Groups often meet on Mondays. It is good day to organize and plan for the rest of the week as well. IN THE NORSE AND GERMANIC TRADITIONS, THE MOON IS ALWAYS MASCULINE! In Norse, the Moon is “Mani.” Mani’s sister is Sol, the Sun. Sol is pursued by a wolf and Mani is pursued by Hati, who will catch him at Ragnorok and devour him. This is why the wolf is called Managarmr ‘devourer of Mani.’

This can also be a day of creativity drawing upon ones imagination and also a day of psychic awareness.