The Witches Spell for February 18th – Communicate With Animals

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Communicate With Animals

 

Items You Will Need:

None

Instructions:

The animal kingdom is very important to those who immerse themselves in natural magick. Sometimes you may want to communicate with animals or simply see the world through their eyes. A simple spell for merging your mind with animal is as follows:

Center yourself by sitting or lying upon the ground, closing your eyes, and imagine a whirlpool of energy surrounding you travelling in  clockwise motion from your head down to your feet, back up to your head, and back down to your feet. Continue this imagery until you feel grounded and centered, oblivious to daily distractions and cares. Once centered, allow your mind to wander to the animal you wish to merge with. Don’t force the imagery, rather allow it to happen.

Picture this animal clearly in your mind. Watch it, empathize with it, feel yourself merging with it. Imagine what it is like to be the animal. Imagine the sights it sees, the smells it senses, the motivations and ways of thinking it may have. Become those thoughts. Merge with the animal by dissolving the distinctions that make it separate.

Once you have fully merged with the animal, you can communicate with it. Ask it what you want to know. Tell it what you want it to know.

——By Ghost Writer

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Dog Safety Tips for Fourth of July

Dog Safety Tips for Fourth of July

While we might associate the thump and boom of fireworks with festivity and a  great display, many of our canine companions are completely freaked out by  Fourth of July noises. Some dogs cower and shiver, some panic and try to escape  from their homes.

We checked in with the The Humane Society to gather some advice for the  pooches, here’s what they had to offer:

1. Resist the urge to take your pet to fireworks displays.

2. Do not leave your pet in the car. With only hot air to breathe inside a  car, your pet can suffer serious health effects–even death–in a few short  minutes. Partially opened windows do not provide sufficient air, but they do  provide an opportunity for your pet to be stolen.

3.  Keep your pets indoors at home in a sheltered, quiet area. Some animals  can become destructive when frightened, so be sure that you’ve removed any items  that your pet could destroy or that would be harmful to your pet if chewed.  Leave a television or radio playing at normal volume to keep him company while  you’re attending Fourth of July picnics, parades, and other celebrations.

4. If you know that your pet is seriously distressed by loud noises like  thunder, consult with your veterinarian before July 4th for ways to help  alleviate the fear and anxiety he or she will experience during fireworks  displays.

 

 

Special Kitty of the Day for March 14th

Gryffindor, the Cat of the Day
Name: Gryffindor
Age: One and a half years old
Gender: Male
Kind: Korat
Home: Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Irealize every pet owner believes their furry friend is the ultimate pet of pets. However, Gryffindor is more than a pet to me. As a college student with a busy schedule, Gryffindor is ultimate companion. I can always count on him to greet me each and every time I step through the front door. He anxiously awaits on the same step (where he has a clear view of the driveway) day in and day out and sprints down the stairs to offer a warming hello upon my arrival. Good luck finding a human with that type of commitment! I received Gryffindor as a 21st birthday present. I remember the day I picked him out from a Kansas Humane Society Shelter. I had been previously viewing photos on the shelter’s website days before Gryffindor’s adoption. Growing up, I had the same cat, Snowball, who I loved more than anything in the world. After almost nineteen years with me, Snowball left to join Kitten Heaven. I needed to find not a replacement for Snowball, but a companion that could fill the empty space Snowball had left in my heart and who I could devote my time and attention to the way I did with her.

Then, one day I came across this beautiful gray kitten with the bluest eyes that warmed your heart with one look. “Asher” was his name and he was only weeks old. I saved his photo as the background of my mother and father’s phone screen so they might get a hint of the one thing that would make my birthday special. I would causally throw into conversations what it would be like to be “Asher’s” owner. They would laugh it off and tell me I was being silly. Then around a week later, I remember my father waking me up and asking how I felt about giving “Asher” a home that day. I leaped out of bed and was ready to go in seconds. Once we got to the Humane Society I made an appointment to meet “Asher” before any other kitten. I wanted to keep my options, but the minute they handed him to me and I could feel his tiny little self start purring I knew I had to have him. I viewed a couple more kittens, but none of them greeted me like “Asher” did. He started playing with my shoe strings right away and I couldn’t leave that place without him in hand. We adopted “Asher” that afternoon and that evening a Harry Potter marathon was on. I’m not the biggest HP fan, but a scene was playing in which a professor transforms into a beautiful gray cat. I looked at “Asher” and decided he needed a name as unique as his personality. That’s when “Asher” became my Gryffindor.

To this day, the name Gryffindor couldn’t be more fitting. Gryffindor is the ultimate social ham. He loves people and he loves attention. He’s the most agile cat I’ve ever seen. He finds new obstacles to climb every day. He loves paper balls and will fetch them much like a dog would. His personality is the perfect mix of spunk and compassion. He can entertain me for hours but also cuddle with me when I’ve had a bad day. I am the luckiest girl in the world to call Gryffindor mine.

“You Lied!” Some Thoughts on Honesty and Pagan Practice

“You Lied!” Some Thoughts on Honesty and Pagan Practice

Author: Bronwen Forbes

When I first began to formally study Paganism, it was drilled into my head over and over: “A witch is only as good as his or her word.” In other words, there is a direct relationship between the quality and effectiveness of your magick and how good you are at telling the truth and keeping promises.

Which makes sense, when you think bout it, because say, for example, you are doing a working to find a new job and you promise Hestia that if you get a job you will volunteer so many hours a week a the local soup kitchen in Her name. Then suppose you promise your friend that you will meet her for lunch and something better comes up and you break your promise to your friend. Why, then, if you don’t keep your word to your friend should Hestia have any reason to believe you’ll keep your promise to her? Odds are you won’t get that new job if Hestia has anything to do with it.

This is partly a matter of will. If magick is, as some say, “change in accordance with will, ” this implies t hat a person’s will is pretty important. And a major component of will is the strength to do what you say you will do – no matter how hard that may become. If your word is good, chances are your will and your magick will be pretty strong.

I was also taught that it’s okay to lie if it’s a matter of life and death. I would say: evaluate the situation very carefully before choosing to lie “for the greater good.” Let me give an example. About eight years ago I was a very busy volunteer with a local no-kill animal rescue organization. I was also – and still am – totally, utterly and completely smitten with beagles.

So when I saw a miserable shy little beagle on our town’s high-kill Humane Society’s web page, I leapt into action. I tried to adopt Joe the Shy Beagle, stating openly that I was a volunteer with the no-kill rescue group. The folks at the Humane Society wouldn’t let me have him, stating that they were afraid I’d just turn around and adopt him out to someone else. We went back and forth on this issue for a few days while Joe cowered in the back of his cage. Meanwhile, the clock ticked down to the day that Joe was scheduled to be euthanized. And since no one wants to adopt a dog that’s literally paralyzed with fear (except me, apparently) , I was running out of time if I wanted to save Joe’s life.

So I lied.

I told the staff at the Humane Society that my husband had completely fallen in love with Joe and we now wanted to keep him. And a day later I brought Joe home. Within a month I’d sent him to live with my mother after he freaked out because the neighborhood kids had gone a little overboard with Fourth of July fireworks. He’s been with my mother ever since.

Did I do the right thing? On the surface, yes I did. I deliberately lied – and made my husband lie – in order to save an animal’s life; an animal, I should add, that my mother loves very much. For years I used this example to teach my students to think about their actions and the ethics of those actions. I was actually proud of the fact that I’d saved Joe’s life and cited the whole incident as an example of “harm none; all life is sacred.”

Except there’s more to the story. My family currently lives with my mother, which means we live with Joe. Beagles are, in general, cheerful, outgoing, friendly, cuddly, happy little dogs. Eight years after I pulled him out of the back of his cage at the Humane Society, Joe is still none of these things. He cowers, snarls at the other dogs, and (most disturbingly) if startled by motion four or five feet away, snaps at my five-year-old daughter (who was raised with dogs and knows how to behave around them) . It’s only a matter of time before he bites her. Joe is also slowly dying of stress-related health issues.

Had I not lied to the Humane Society staff all those years ago, Joe would have lived a few more days and been humanely euthanized by a painless overdose of barbiturates. But I did, and now I get to watch a desperately unhappy dog take years to die by inches – and possibly do serious damage to my child before he goes.

Did I ultimately do Joe any favor? In my opinion, no. Have I done him harm? Absolutely. And that, gentle readers, is bad magick.

There are also less painful, more practical spiritual reasons to keep your word and live as truthful a life as possible. For example, if you aspire to join a British Traditional or a British Traditional-based coven, you’re going to be expected to swear at least a few oaths. And these groups take these oaths pretty seriously. In other words, if you’ve developed a reputation in the community for being flaky about commitments or gossiping (breaking your word) spreading wild stories or inventing training/lineage credentials (lying) or you’re just generally an all-around unreliable person, you’re not going to be invited to join an oath-taking group. Of course, even if you’re not interested in joining a traditionally-minded group, it would still be nice not to have a bad reputation in the community, wouldn’t it?

On the other hand, and completely tongue-in-cheek here, the “white lie” rules that apply outside the Pagan community apply here, too. In other words, if anyone of any gender asks you, “Does this robe make me look fat?” your best option is, of course, to say no!

But in all seriousness, being as truthful as possible can only make you a better practitioner, a better covener, a better community member, and an all-around better person. We need more of those. I think Joe the Beagle would agree.

Wonderful Tuesday Morn’ To You All!

Top Of The Morning To Ya’ ! Everyone up and at ’em, I hope! I am thrilled because there is a chance of rain. Darn shame too, my wolfie spider and I won’t get to play. For the last two waterings, I haven’t seen any signs of him at all. I figure he has got to enlist recruits. Then they will get me, lol! But that is absolutely scary 5:30 in the morning and have one of them jump on you.

Blew my bonding with the wildcats last night. (I just have to throw this in!) Yesterday afternoon, Kiki would not stop barking to save me. Finally I got over there with her and she was barking because Mama was going into the thicket. Kiki is a very loving pup as long as it isn’t another dog. She was raised with 4 pit bulls. She thinks she is the baddest thing on four paws. Anyway back to last night, I had this huge bug buzz my ear, swatting at it and telling it to go away, did no go. Well the critter flew to the other ear and did the same thing. By this time, if I had a swatter he would have been smashed. Well the last straw, he flew up the back of my hair and was at my neck. That was it. I started screaming, hollering and acting a fool. The cats started growling and a hissing at me. I said, “Screw this s*&t I’m going in.” Well apparently the bug didn’t mind the critters, just didn’t like big fuzzy thing 😦

I feel like I need a little Bugs Bunny to pop through the screen now hollering

“That’s all, Folks!”

“You Lied!” Some Thoughts on Honesty and Pagan Practice

“You Lied!” Some Thoughts on Honesty and Pagan Practice

Author: Bronwen Forbes

When I first began to formally study Paganism, it was drilled into my head over and over: “A witch is only as good as his or her word.” In other words, there is a direct relationship between the quality and effectiveness of your magick and how good you are at telling the truth and keeping promises.

Which makes sense, when you think bout it, because say, for example, you are doing a working to find a new job and you promise Hestia that if you get a job you will volunteer so many hours a week a the local soup kitchen in Her name. Then suppose you promise your friend that you will meet her for lunch and something better comes up and you break your promise to your friend. Why, then, if you don’t keep your word to your friend should Hestia have any reason to believe you’ll keep your promise to her? Odds are you won’t get that new job if Hestia has anything to do with it.

This is partly a matter of will. If magick is, as some say, “change in accordance with will, ” this implies t hat a person’s will is pretty important. And a major component of will is the strength to do what you say you will do – no matter how hard that may become. If your word is good, chances are your will and your magick will be pretty strong.

I was also taught that it’s okay to lie if it’s a matter of life and death. I would say: evaluate the situation very carefully before choosing to lie “for the greater good.” Let me give an example. About eight years ago I was a very busy volunteer with a local no-kill animal rescue organization. I was also – and still am – totally, utterly and completely smitten with beagles.

So when I saw a miserable shy little beagle on our town’s high-kill Humane Society’s web page, I leapt into action. I tried to adopt Joe the Shy Beagle, stating openly that I was a volunteer with the no-kill rescue group. The folks at the Humane Society wouldn’t let me have him, stating that they were afraid I’d just turn around and adopt him out to someone else. We went back and forth on this issue for a few days while Joe cowered in the back of his cage. Meanwhile, the clock ticked down to the day that Joe was scheduled to be euthanized. And since no one wants to adopt a dog that’s literally paralyzed with fear (except me, apparently) , I was running out of time if I wanted to save Joe’s life.

So I lied.

I told the staff at the Humane Society that my husband had completely fallen in love with Joe and we now wanted to keep him. And a day later I brought Joe home. Within a month I’d sent him to live with my mother after he freaked out because the neighborhood kids had gone a little overboard with Fourth of July fireworks. He’s been with my mother ever since.

Did I do the right thing? On the surface, yes I did. I deliberately lied – and made my husband lie – in order to save an animal’s life; an animal, I should add, that my mother loves very much. For years I used this example to teach my students to think about their actions and the ethics of those actions. I was actually proud of the fact that I’d saved Joe’s life and cited the whole incident as an example of “harm none; all life is sacred.”

Except there’s more to the story. My family currently lives with my mother, which means we live with Joe. Beagles are, in general, cheerful, outgoing, friendly, cuddly, happy little dogs. Eight years after I pulled him out of the back of his cage at the Humane Society, Joe is still none of these things. He cowers, snarls at the other dogs, and (most disturbingly) if startled by motion four or five feet away, snaps at my five-year-old daughter (who was raised with dogs and knows how to behave around them) . It’s only a matter of time before he bites her. Joe is also slowly dying of stress-related health issues.

Had I not lied to the Humane Society staff all those years ago, Joe would have lived a few more days and been humanely euthanized by a painless overdose of barbiturates. But I did, and now I get to watch a desperately unhappy dog take years to die by inches – and possibly do serious damage to my child before he goes.

Did I ultimately do Joe any favor? In my opinion, no. Have I done him harm? Absolutely. And that, gentle readers, is bad magick.

There are also less painful, more practical spiritual reasons to keep your word and live as truthful a life as possible. For example, if you aspire to join a British Traditional or a British Traditional-based coven, you’re going to be expected to swear at least a few oaths. And these groups take these oaths pretty seriously. In other words, if you’ve developed a reputation in the community for being flaky about commitments or gossiping (breaking your word) spreading wild stories or inventing training/lineage credentials (lying) or you’re just generally an all-around unreliable person, you’re not going to be invited to join an oath-taking group. Of course, even if you’re not interested in joining a traditionally-minded group, it would still be nice not to have a bad reputation in the community, wouldn’t it?

On the other hand, and completely tongue-in-cheek here, the “white lie” rules that apply outside the Pagan community apply here, too. In other words, if anyone of any gender asks you, “Does this robe make me look fat?” your best option is, of course, to say no!

But in all seriousness, being as truthful as possible can only make you a better practitioner, a better covener, a better community member, and an all-around better person. We need more of those. I think Joe the Beagle would agree.