The Witches Almanac for Thursday, February 25th

The Witches Almanac for Thursday, February 25th

Thursday (Jupiter): Expansion, money, prosperity, and generosity.

Saint Walburga’s Day (German)

Waning Moon
The Waning Moon (from the Full Moon to the New) is a time for study, meditation, and little magical work (except magic designed to banish harmful energies).

Moon phase: Third Quarter

Moon Sign: Libra
Libra: Favors cooperation, social activities, beautification of surroundings, balance, and partnership.

Incense: Myrrh

Color: Purple

Advertisements

The Witches Almanac for Thursday, February 11


The Witches Almanac for Thursday, February 11

Thursday (Jupiter): Expansion, money, prosperity, and generosity.

Foundation Day (Japanese)

 

Waxing Moon
The Waxing Moon (from the New Moon to the Full) is the ideal time for magic to draw things toward you.

Moon phase: First Quarter

Moon Sign: Pisces
Pisces: The focus is on dreaming, nostalgia, intuition, and psychic impressions. A good time for spiritual or philanthropic activities.

Moon enters Aries 4: 55 am
Aries: Good for starting things, but lacks staying power. Things occur rapidly, but quickly pass. People tend to be argumentative and assertive.

Incense: Clove

Color: Green

 

The Witches Almanac for Thursday, February 4th

Wolves
The Witches Almanac for Thursday, February 4th

Thursday (Jupiter): Expansion, money, prosperity, and generosity.

Independence Day (Sri Lankan)

Waning Moon
The Waning Moon (from the Full Moon to the New) is a time for study, meditation, and little magical work (except magic designed to banish harmful energies).

Moon phase: Fourth Quarter

Moon Sign: Sagittarius
Sagittarius: Encourages flights of imagination and confidence. This is an adventurous, philosophical, and athletic Moon sign. Favors expansion and growth.

Moon enters Capricorn 7: 44 pm
Capricorn: Develops strong structure. Focus on traditions, responsibilities, and obligations. A good time to set boundaries and rules.

Incense: Jasmine

Color: Turquoise

The Witches Almanac for Tuesday, July 28th

Her Celtic Dreams
The Witches Almanac for Tuesday, July 28th

Tuesday (Mars): Passion, sex, courage, aggression and protection.

Independence Day (Peruvian)

Waxing Moon
The Waxing Moon is the ideal time for magick to draw things toward you.

Moon phase: Second Quarter

Moon Sign: Sagittarius
Sagittarius: Encourages flights of imagination and confidence. This is an adventurous, philosophical, and athletic Moon sign. Favors expansion and growth.

Moon enters Capricorn 2: 47 pm
Capricorn: Develops strong structure. Focus on traditions, responsibilities, and obligations. A good time to set boundaries and rules.

Incense: Ginger

Color: Black

Traditions and Customs for July 4th

4th of July Comments

Traditions and Customs for July 4th

 

 

Independence Day is a national holiday marked by patriotic displays. Similar to other summer-themed events, Independence Day celebrations often take place outdoors. Independence Day is a federal holiday, so all non-essential federal institutions (like the postal service and federal courts) are closed on that day. Many politicians make it a point on this day to appear at a public event to praise the nation’s heritage, laws, history, society, and people.

Families often celebrate Independence Day by hosting or attending a picnic or barbecue and take advantage of the day off and, in some years, long weekend to gather with relatives. Decorations (e.g., streamers, balloons, and clothing) are generally colored red, white, and blue, the colors of the American flag. Parades are often in the morning, while fireworks displays occur in the evening at such places as parks, fairgrounds, or town squares.

The night before the Fourth was once the focal point of celebrations, marked by raucous gatherings often incorporating bonfires as their centerpiece. In New England, towns competed to build towering pyramids, assembled from barrels and casks. They were lit at nightfall, to usher in the celebration. The highest were in Salem, Massachusetts (on Gallows Hill, the famous site of the execution of 13 women and 6 men for witchcraft in 1692 during the Salem witch trials, where the tradition of bonfires in celebration had persisted), composed of as many as forty tiers of barrels; these are the tallest bonfires ever recorded. The custom flourished in the 19th and 20th centuries, and is still practiced in some New England towns.

Independence Day fireworks are often accompanied by patriotic songs such as the national anthem “The Star-Spangled Banner”, “God Bless America”, “America the Beautiful”, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”, “This Land Is Your Land”, “Stars and Stripes Forever”, and, regionally, “Yankee Doodle” in northeastern states and “Dixie” in southern states. Some of the lyrics recall images of the Revolutionary War or the War of 1812.

Independence Day Parade in Washington, D.C.

Firework shows are held in many states, and many fireworks are sold for personal use or as an alternative to a public show. Safety concerns have led some states to ban fireworks or limit the sizes and types allowed. Illicit traffic transfers many fireworks from less restrictive states.

A salute of one gun for each state in the United States, called a “salute to the union,” is fired on Independence Day at noon by any capable military base.

In 2009, New York City had the largest fireworks display in the country, with over 22 tons of pyrotechnics exploded.[21] Other major displays are in Chicago on Lake Michigan; in San Diego over Mission Bay; in Boston on the Charles River; in St. Louis on the Mississippi River; in San Francisco over the San Francisco Bay; and on the National Mall in Washington, D.C..

During the annual Windsor-Detroit International Freedom Festival, Detroit, Michigan hosts one of the world’s largest fireworks displays, over the Detroit River, to celebrate Independence Day in conjunction with Windsor, Ontario’s celebration of Canada Day.

While the official observance always falls on July 4, participation levels may vary according to which day of the week the 4th falls on. If the holiday falls in the middle of the week, some fireworks displays and celebrations may take place during the weekend for convenience, again, varying by region.

The first week of July is typically one of the busiest American travel periods of the year, as many people utilize the holiday for extended vacation trips

 

 

Source:
Wikipedia

 

 

Observances Throughout History for Saturday, July 4th


4th of July Comments

Observances Throughout History for Saturday, July 4th

 

 

In 1777, thirteen gunshots were fired in salute, once at morning and once again as evening fell, on July 4 in Bristol, Rhode Island. Philadelphia celebrated the first anniversary in a manner a modern American would find quite familiar: an official dinner for the Continental Congress, toasts, 13-gun salutes, speeches, prayers, music, parades, troop reviews, and fireworks. Ships were decked with red, white, and blue bunting.

In 1778, from his headquarters at Ross Hall, near New Brunswick, New Jersey, General George Washington marked July 4 with a double ration of rum for his soldiers and an artillery salute (feu de joie). Across the Atlantic Ocean, ambassadors John Adams and Benjamin Franklin held a dinner for their fellow Americans in Paris, France.

In 1779, July 4 fell on a Sunday. The holiday was celebrated on Monday, July 5.

In 1781 the Massachusetts General Court became the first state legislature to recognize July 4 as a state celebration.

In 1783, Moravians in Salem, North Carolina, held a celebration of July 4 with a challenging music program assembled by Johann Friedrich Peter. This work was titled “The Psalm of Joy.” This is recognized as the first recorded celebration and is still celebrated there today.

In 1791 the first recorded use of the name “Independence Day” occurred.

In 1870, the U.S. Congress made Independence Day an unpaid holiday for federal employees.

In 1938, Congress changed Independence Day to a paid federal holiday.

 

Source:
Wikipedia

 

 

Saturday, the Fourth of July


4th of July Comments

Saturday, the Fourth of July

 

Independence Day of the United States, also referred to as Fourth of July or July Fourth in the U.S., is a federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, by the Continental Congress declaring that the thirteen American colonies regarded themselves as a new nation, the United States of America, and no longer part of the British Empire.[1] Independence Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, and political speeches and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States. Independence Day is the National Day of the United States.

 

 

Wikipedia

 

 

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Independence Day


4th of July Comments
July 4th

Independence Day

It was after the famous midnight ride of Paul Revere in April 1775 that England’s colonies in the New World began their armed conflict against the British Imperial power. By July 2, 1775, the colonies voted for independence from Britain. A document was drawn up stating this intent. On July 4, 1776, what we know as the Declaration of Independence was signed by John Hancock – president of the Continental Congress at Philadelphia – and delegates from the 13 colonies. By the 1880s Independence Day had become a major American holiday.

The Witches Almanac for Saturday, July 4th

4th of July Comments
The Witches Almanac for Saturday, July 4th

Saturday (Saturn): Longevity, exorcism, endings, homes and houses.

Independence Day

 

Waning Moon
The Waning Moon is a time for study, meditation, and little magickal work (except magick designed to banish harmful energies).

Moon phase: Third Quarter

Moon Sign: Aquarius
Aquarius: Rebellious energy. Time to break habits and make abrupt changes. Personal freedom and individuality is the focus.

Incense: Sage

Color: Black

Today Is …

Today Is …

Day of Anukins, Goddess of Fertility of the Nile. Create a “flood” on your altar and ask that all those in Africa and every other place in need have enough to eat this year.

On this date (approximately), a festival called The Thargelia was celebrated by the ancient Greeks and Ionians in honor of Apollo, the God of the sun, prophecy, music, medicine, and poetry. The festival was held once a year on the sacred island of Delos, the traditional birthplace of Apollo as well as the Goddess Artemis.

Festa of St. Nicola in Bari, Italy celebrates the transfer of his relics to Bari. Religious rites followed by spectacular fireworks displays, honor this patron of orphans, pirates, etc.

Hari Hol Pahang – Malaysia

National School Nurse Day – United States of America

Royal Ploughing Ceremony – Thailand

Yom Ha Atzmaut / Independence Day – Israel

Week of the Classroom Teacher – United States of America

Yom Ha Atzmaut / Independence Day – Judaism

Courtesy of GrannyMoonsMorningFeast