Good Sunday Afternoon Dear Family & Friends!


Good afternoon, dear family & friends! How is everyone doing today? I hope super. I would like to thank everyone for their emails of concern to us. I have to admit we have been gone away to long. We have never let an active site of ours’ go down like this one did. I apologize for that. We have all been deathly ill with some sort of flu or virus. I know one thing, if you haven’t had it yet, hide, run for your life, leave the country (do I sound extreme, lol!). I can laugh now but I wasn’t doing much laughing with my head hung in the toilet. Bad, bad, bad experience. But the bug hit us, one right after the other. I have never seen anything like it. I know I was watching the local News and they said Kentucky was at its’ peak for the flu. I just wish they would tell me something I didn’t already know! I do feel better but I am not a 100% yet.

We are going to try to get the show back on the road tomorrow. Hopefully, we can get back to normal sometime soon. But like I always say, “what’s normal for us, huh?” Perhaps when Spring gets here, we will get back to normal then. I honestly hope it doesn’t take that long. :s If it does, I am going to dig me a hole and climb in. I hate being sick. I hate having my daily routine interrupted also. Speaking of which for the last two weeks my routine has been laying around on the couch moaning and groaning. I think the couch is calling my name now!

I hate to run but like I said I don’t feel 100% yet. I am going to go lay back down and hopefully tomorrow we will see you with bright, shiny faces. Thank you again for all of your concern and please keep us in your prayers.

Luv & Hugs,

Lady A

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Happy & Blessed Sunday To All My Friends! It’s A Spell Sunday Today!

Good afternoon to all my dear friends! I hope everyone is having a great day. I am sorry for no dailies today but it is going to be a great day anyway! It is a “Spell for All Sunday.” Can you spell that without any “l’s”?

Really I feel like crap. I have a mild case of West Nile Virus. If it is out there I am going to catch it. Last night was the most miserable night in my life. My husband took me to the hospital at 3 a.m. They did blood work and everything and told me, “I have a mild case of West Nile’s Virus.” If this is a mild case, I sure in the hell wouldn’t won’t a severe case.  I have enough medicine to kill a hog. My husband got upset when they let me leave the hospital. They told him what I had was like having a severe case of the flu. Makes a lot of sense, a mild case of West Nile’s, but a severe case of the flu, hmm? I am still trying to figure that one out. But anyway, I wouldn’t want to be in the hospital for nothing. I had enough of the hospitals a few year ago. So if I act a little more out of it than usual you know what’s the matter, lol! I have to get up and post something in the Apothecary anyway. I haven’t made Anastasia a manager over there yet or she could do it all.

Well I am going to get to posting some spells and other info. I hope you have a fantastic Sunday, what’s left of it anyway. And don’t forget to see if you can spell that without any “l’s”, lol!

Luv & Hugs,

Lady A

 

 

 

 

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Listeria fears expand N.C. cantaloupe recall; feds find ‘unsanitary conditions’

Listeria fears expand N.C. cantaloupe recall; feds find ‘unsanitary conditions’

By JoNel Aleccia, NBC News

Federal health inspectors have found unsanitary conditions at a North Carolina cantaloupe packing shed, leading to an expanded recall of melons that may be potentially contaminated with listeria.

Burch Equipment LLC of Faison, N.C., is pulling 188,902 melons from store shelves in 10 states because of possible contamination that can cause illness and death, particularly in the very young, the very old, pregnant women and those with health problems.

The company’s voluntary recall comes nearly a year after one of the deadliest foodborne illness outbreaks in U.S. history, in which contaminated Colorado cantaloupes sickened 146 people, including at least 30 who died and one woman who had a miscarriage.

The new recall of 13,888 cases of whole Athena variety cantaloupes follows a recall last week of 580 cases of the summer fruit.

Federal Food and Drug Administration officials and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture are conducting an ongoing inspection at Burch Farms. The FDA warned this week that consumers should not eat the summer melons, which carry a red Burch Farms label and the code PLU #4319.

The melons were shipped between July 15 and July 17 and distributed to retail stores in Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia.

Consumers should discard the melons, the FDA said.

No illnesses have been reported in connection with the Burch Farms melons, according to a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Listeria monocytogenes infections can cause symptoms including high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea.

But the possibility of another bout of contaminated cantaloupe has stunned at least one family affected by the listeria outbreak caused by Jensen Farms of Holly, Colo.

“It’s so frustrating. It’s unbelievable,” said Michelle Wakley-Paciorek, mother of Kendall Paciorek, now 10 months, who suffered a life-threatening listeria infection at birth because of the tainted cantaloupe. “I can’t even tell you. It’s making my eyes tear up, after what everybody’s been through.”

Dirty equipment, faulty sanitation and bad storage practices at Jensen Farms led to the deadly infections, federal officials concluded. The firm has filed for bankruptcy.

That outbreak led to industry-wide changes in and attention to cantaloupe safety protocols, said Kathy Means, vice president of public affairs for the Produce Marketing Association. Members of the Rocky Ford Growers Association in Colorado invested between $800,000 and $1 million in safety upgrades, said spokeswoman Diane Mulligan.

Means said she couldn’t speak to conditions at the Burch Farms site, but she said that produce growers take the problem “very seriously.”

“We’re always disappointed when anything leads to consumer concerns,” she said.

However, she noted that the contamination was detected, the affected melons were recalled and that no illnesses have been reported to date.

“We wouldn’t want to see anyone stop eating cantaloupe,” she said. “I am confident that the system is working.”

But Wakley-Paciorek said that she no longer buys any melon. To learn that unsanitary conditions were found at another cantaloupe packing shed less than a year after listeria nearly killed her newborn is dismaying beyond words, she said.

Kendall is developmentally delayed and requires the aid of three physical therapists to help repair the deficits caused by the listeria infection.

“It’s shocking that this could happen again,” she said.

New pig flu strain can spread at state fairs, CDC warns

New pig flu strain can spread at state fairs, CDC warns

By MIKE STOBBE

ATLANTA — It’s the season for state and county fairs, and health officials are reminding fairgoers to be careful around pigs because of a new flu spreading   from the animals to people.

Officials say 29 human cases of the new strain of swine flu have been confirmed in the last year, including 12 this week. Ten were linked to the Butler County Fair in southwest Ohio, which ended last weekend.

The new flu has a gene from the 2009 pandemic strain that might make it more contagious. But so far, the strain hasn’t spread easily among people, and recent cases have been mild.

Fairgoers should wash their hands and avoid taking food and drinks into barns. Pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems should be extra careful.

Tanning Trumps Skin Cancer Fears for Young Adults

by Ann Pietrangelo

Young adults would rather indulge in tanning today than worry about skin  cancer tomorrow. Tanning is the norm in some circles. It’s expected. Skin cancer  is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the most  deadly type of skin cancer, but that’s not scaring young adults from the lure of  the tanning booth.

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and from indoor tanning  equipment increase the risk of developing skin cancer. Engaging in indoor  tanning before age 35 increases the risk of melanoma by 75 percent. Recent  studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National  Cancer Institute found that:

  • Indoor tanning is common among young adults, with the highest rates of  indoor tanning among white women aged 18-21 years (32 percent) and 22-25 years  (30 percent). The reports evaluated data from the National Health Interview  Survey’s Cancer Control Supplement.
  • The highest prevalence of indoor tanning was reported among white women aged  18-21 years residing in the Midwest (44 percent), and those aged 22-25 years in  the South (36 percent).
  • Among white women aged 18-21 years who reported indoor tanning, an average  of 28 visits occurred in the past year.
  • Among white adults who reported indoor tanning, 58 percent of women and 40  percent of men used one 10 or more times in the previous year.
  • Fifty percent of people aged 18-29 reported at least one sunburn in the  previous year despite taking protective measures.

“More public health efforts, including providing shade and  sunscreen in recreational settings, are needed to raise awareness of the  importance of sun protection and sunburn prevention to reduce the burden of skin  cancer,” said Marcus Plescia, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Division of Cancer  Prevention and Control. “We must accelerate our efforts to educate young adults  about the dangers of indoor tanning to prevent melanoma as this generation  ages.”

The reports were published in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly  Report.

On a personal note, I’m not a “tanner” and I’ve not had skin cancer, but I have  had cancer. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. It’s certainly not a good trade  for tan skin — or red skin — or orange skin. It is an avoidable risk and one not worth  taking. Oh, and if you’re concerned about your appearance, it is worth noting  that over time, tanning gives your skin that nice wrinkled, leathery look…

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

E. Coli O145 Ban Opposed by Meat Industry

by Dr. Michael Greger

 

One child is dead and 13 others sickened across six states in an ongoing  outbreak of E. coli O145. Another child—a first-grader in  Massachusetts—also died recently, but that was due to a different strain of  E. coli, O157. After the Jack-in-the-Box outbreak in 1993, E.  coli O157 was declared an adulterant, meaning it became illegal to sell  meat testing positive for the deadly pathogen. It still, however, remained  perfectly legal to sell meat contaminated with the other “Big Six”  toxin-producing E. coli strains: O26, O111, O103, O121, O45 and O145.  These strains are collectively sickening twice as many Americans as O157. For years, food safety and  consumer organizations have fought to ban the sale of meat soiled with these  other deadly strains against meat industry objections.

In the 1990s, the American Meat Institute opposed the original ban on the  sale of raw meat contaminated with E. coli O157 despite the devastating  effect this pathogen could have on vulnerable populations, especially children.  Here’s how one mother described what E. coli O157:H7 did to her  three-year-old daughter Brianna:

“The pain during the first 80 hours was horrific,  with intense abdominal cramping every 10 to 12 minutes. Her intestines swelled  to three times their normal size and she was placed on a ventilator. Emergency  surgery became essential and her colon was removed. After further surgery,  doctors decided to leave the incision open, from sternum to pubis, to allow  Brianna’s swollen organs room to expand and prevent them from ripping her skin.  Her heart was so swollen it was like a sponge and bled from every pore. Her  liver and pancreas shut down and she was gripped by thousands of convulsions,  which caused blood clots in her eyes. We were told she was brain dead.”

The ban passed in 1994 despite meat industry opposition, and now the number  of Americans dying from E. coli O157 is half of what it used to be.  Unfortunately this lesson was lost on the American Meat Institute, which  continued to fight tooth and nail against similar regulations targeting the  other Big Six strains. This week they lost. Meat known to test positive for any of these  potentially deadly fecal pathogens can no longer be legally sold as of June 4,  2012. Too late for Maelan Elizabeth Graffagnini, though—the 21-month old victim  of E. coli O145 whose funeral was held the same day.

The immediate source of the current outbreak has yet to be identified, but  the original source is always the same: feces. How contaminated is the American  meat supply with fecal matter?

What about the hundreds of thousands of Americans that die from  non-intestinal E. coli infections? Please feel free to check  out my 3-min. video Chicken Out of UTIs.

The meat industry argues that they should be allowed to sell unsafe meat  because it only poses a risk if it’s not properly cooked or handled. Ironically,  they’re also opposed to safe handling labeling. See my 3-min. video Food  Poisoning Bacteria Cross-Contamination.

In health, Michael Greger, M.D.