Tanning Trumps Skin Cancer Fears for Young Adults

by Ann Pietrangelo

Young adults would rather indulge in tanning today than worry about skin  cancer tomorrow. Tanning is the norm in some circles. It’s expected. Skin cancer  is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the most  deadly type of skin cancer, but that’s not scaring young adults from the lure of  the tanning booth.

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and from indoor tanning  equipment increase the risk of developing skin cancer. Engaging in indoor  tanning before age 35 increases the risk of melanoma by 75 percent. Recent  studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National  Cancer Institute found that:

  • Indoor tanning is common among young adults, with the highest rates of  indoor tanning among white women aged 18-21 years (32 percent) and 22-25 years  (30 percent). The reports evaluated data from the National Health Interview  Survey’s Cancer Control Supplement.
  • The highest prevalence of indoor tanning was reported among white women aged  18-21 years residing in the Midwest (44 percent), and those aged 22-25 years in  the South (36 percent).
  • Among white women aged 18-21 years who reported indoor tanning, an average  of 28 visits occurred in the past year.
  • Among white adults who reported indoor tanning, 58 percent of women and 40  percent of men used one 10 or more times in the previous year.
  • Fifty percent of people aged 18-29 reported at least one sunburn in the  previous year despite taking protective measures.

“More public health efforts, including providing shade and  sunscreen in recreational settings, are needed to raise awareness of the  importance of sun protection and sunburn prevention to reduce the burden of skin  cancer,” said Marcus Plescia, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Division of Cancer  Prevention and Control. “We must accelerate our efforts to educate young adults  about the dangers of indoor tanning to prevent melanoma as this generation  ages.”

The reports were published in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly  Report.

On a personal note, I’m not a “tanner” and I’ve not had skin cancer, but I have  had cancer. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. It’s certainly not a good trade  for tan skin — or red skin — or orange skin. It is an avoidable risk and one not worth  taking. Oh, and if you’re concerned about your appearance, it is worth noting  that over time, tanning gives your skin that nice wrinkled, leathery look…

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Daily Feng Shui Tip of the Day for May 27th – Sunscreen Day

With the hot days of summer just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about breaking out the sunscreen. And even though this is ‘Sunscreen Day,’ you should probably be using it all year round. So, no matter the season or the SPF, here are some fast and fun ways to know if you need to use protection. When outside, if your shadow is shorter than your actual height, you can get sunburned. If it’s overcast or cloudy, you still need sunscreen. And, of course, if you’re going to be in the sun between ten in the morning and two in the afternoon, you’ll need protection. But if you still manage to get sunburned, then just do this: Fill a one-quart jar with equal parts milk and ice and two tablespoons of salt. Soak a washcloth in this mix and place it on any burned body parts. Leave it on for at least twenty minutes and then reapply as needed. The milk will serve to absorb the heat from the burn while the ice and salt bring the balm. This secret sunburn therapy really is the last line of daily sun defense. But you wouldn’t need it at all if you just applied an appropriate amount of sunscreen to begin with!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com