FERTILITY SPELL

FERTILITY SPELL

You Will Need:

Patchouli oil
Sandalwood incense
2 pine cones
3 wheat heads
Green Candle
Green marker and paper

        Rub the oil on the candle and anoint yourself around the womb area with a drop of oil.

       Light the candle and incense and place the pine cones and wheat into a cauldron or container. Visualize your magickal goal and use the marker to draw yourself on the right hand side of the paper as you are now – draw yourself as you want to be on the left side (flat belly – pregnant belly will do just fine) visualize your goal while drawing – when you feel you’ve visualized enough tear the paper in half and fold the left side with your goal drawn on it into a small square and place it in your pocket then light the other paper in the candle flame and place it in the cauldron to burn.

       Chant or pray for your goal to be realized as you watch the paper burn. Bury the contents of the cauldron in your yard – preferable a garden – leave an offering of a small crumb of cake on a crystal plate for any good spirits or fairies who might happen by.

     Stay positive so you don’t attract the attention of any jealous or bad fairies!

     Keep the paper with your goal drawn on it with you at all times until your wish is granted then you can place it in a safe place for luck.

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Daily Feng Shui for December 5 – ‘Bathtub Party Day’

‘Bathtub Party Day’ can quell your nerves while cleaning you up at the same time. Consider it an anxiety-reducing party in your bathtub! Place one tablespoon each of rose petal and wheat grain and ten chopped dried plums in a net. Suspend the net in the bathwater and then add ten drops of rose essential oil. Lie down in the water, close your eyes and focus your concentration on the bottom of your collarbone. Massage your temples while doing this and within twenty minutes you’ll feel like taking this party out of the tub and out on the town.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

Calendar of the Sun for August 6

Calendar of the Sun

6 Weodmonath

Wheat Day

Color: Golden
Element: Earth
Altar: Upon a golden cloth place a sheaf of wheat, a sickle, a clay jug of wheat beer, and a loaf of fresh-baked whole wheat bread.
Offering: Give food to the poor.
Daily Meal: Wheat bread, pasta, or pastry.

Wheat Invocation

Today, sweet golden king,
My hand belongs to Her
As does your body.
I thank you for your gift of life
And I promise you rebirth next year
With this my very same hand.
And in your turn
Since someday my body will be Hers as well
Promise me
The same hope;
Rebirth me in joy everlasting.

(The sickle is swung in a circle, then the wheat beer is passed around, and the remainder poured out as a libation.)

I sing the praises of Wheat,
First grain of the wagon people of Europe,
You who make the bread rise high,
You who make the soft white dough,
You who are sweet
And can last a thousand years
And still blossom forth in the Earth.
I sing the praises of Wheat.

(The bread is passed around, and the remainder scattered in the garden.)

Song: Corn Rigs

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Goddess of the Day for November 5th – Demeter

Goddess of the Day

 

Demeter

The goddess of agriculture, horticulture, grain and harvest. Demeter is a daughter of Cronus and Rhea and sister of Zeus, by whom she bore Persephone. She was depicted as a mature woman, often crowned and holding sheaf’s of wheat and a torch. Her symbols are the Cornucopia (horn of plenty), wheat-ears, the winged serpent and the lotus staff. Her sacred animals are pigs and snakes.

Calendar of the Sun for August 6

Calendar of the Sun

6 Weodmonath

Wheat Day

Color: Golden
Element: Earth
Altar: Upon a golden cloth place a sheaf of wheat, a sickle, a clay jug of wheat beer, and a loaf of fresh-baked whole wheat bread.
Offering: Give food to the poor.
Daily Meal: Wheat bread, pasta, or pastry.

Wheat Invocation

Today, sweet golden king,
My hand belongs to Her
As does your body.
I thank you for your gift of life
And I promise you rebirth next year
With this my very same hand.
And in your turn
Since someday my body will be Hers as well
Promise me
The same hope;
Rebirth me in joy everlasting.

(The sickle is swung in a circle, then the wheat beer is passed around, and the remainder poured out as a libation.)

I sing the praises of Wheat,
First grain of the wagon people of Europe,
You who make the bread rise high,
You who make the soft white dough,
You who are sweet
And can last a thousand years
And still blossom forth in the Earth.
I sing the praises of Wheat.

(The bread is passed around, and the remainder scattered in the garden.)

Song: Corn Rigs

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Things To Do This Lammas……

Throughout today’s posts you will find hints on things to do this Lammas. I hope you enjoy them and find them useful.

Collect corn husks, dry and store  in shade.  “Corn” was a generic term for  cereal crops (i.e., wheat,  barley, oats), and New World corn was added after 1520.  Our non-irrigated winter wheat is harvested in June  and July where I live.  We can collect wild wheat stalks and seeds, tie, and hang in shade.   Make a corn dolly and keep  until the Yule Celebration.  We can pick fruit  (apricots, berries, figs and plums) and dry them.  Many kinds for fruit are ripe  in late July, so place some of these on your home altar.  Many garden herbs  are at their peak and ready for harvesting to make herbal remedies, air  fresheners, use in herbal magic, and for decoration.  There are hundreds of  good books and websites on the magical, sacramental, and health uses of herbs. 

Oh, What A Glorious Morning! Greetings & Merry Lammas To You!

 

Wishing You & Yours A Very Prosperous Harvest This Year,

Dear Friends!

“Lammas celebrates the first wheat or barley  harvest f the year and the skills of those who tend them. Baking and sharing  bread, feasting with neighbor, and honoring the still-powerful forces of the  summer sun’s light, and are key elements of this cooperative, community-based sabbat.   Corn and wheat dollies made from the last sheaves and stalks  of harvested grain are kept through winter to be planted with the first seeds of  spring. These organic Goddess figures powerfully affirm the reverence for the  Earth’s cycles of birth, death, and renewal. The celebrations, which feature a  break from toil, contests of skill, laughter feasting, and dancing, are tempered  by the knowledge that most crops are still growing in the fields with no  guarantee of adequate abundance for the long winter.   Lughnasadh’s energy of cautious optimism and feeling of  well-being bring out the best in all people. The sabbat mingles the expansion of  vibrant summer energy with the gathering energy of the upcoming season. The  result is a unique time for solidly expanding toward focused goals, such as  perfecting and challenging your skills.”

About Lammas

About Lammas

a guide to the Sabbat’s symbolism

by Arwynn MacFeylynnd

Date: August 1 or 2.

Alternative names: Lughnassadh, Lammastide, August Eve, Harvest Home, Ceresalia (Roman, in honor of the grain goddess Ceres), First Fruits, Festival of Green Corn (Native American), Feast of Cardenas, Cornucopia (Strega), Thingtide and Elembiuos. Lammas, an Anglo-Saxon word, means “loaf mass.” Lughnassadh is named for the Irish sun god Lugh (pronounced Loo), and variant spellings are Lughnasadh, Lughnasad, Lughnassad, Lughnasa and Lunasa.

Primary meanings: This festival has two aspects. First, it is one of the Celtic fire festivals, honoring the Celtic culture-bringer Lugh (Lleu to the Welsh, Lugus to the Gauls). In Ireland, races and games were held in his name and that of his mother, Tailtiu (these may have been funeral games). Second, the holiday is the Saxon Feast of Bread, at which the first of the grain harvest is consumed in ritual loaves. These aspects are not too dissimilar, as the shamanic death and transformation of Lleu can be compared to that of the Barley God, known from the folksong “John Barleycorn.”

Lammas celebrates the first of three harvest celebrations in the Craft. It marks the beginning of autumn, the start of the harvest cycle, and relies on the early crops of ripening grain and any fruits and vegetables ready to be harvested. It is associated with bread because grain is one of the first crops harvested. Those in the Craft often give thanks and honor now to gods and goddesses of the harvest, as well as those who represent death and resurrection.

Symbols: All grains, especially corn and wheat, corn dollies, sun wheels, bread, harvesting and threshing tools and the harvest full moon. Altar decorations might include corn dollies or kirn babies (corncob dolls) to symbolize the Mother Goddess of the Harvest. Other appropriate decorations include summer flowers and grains. You might also wish to have a loaf of whole cracked wheat or multigrain bread upon the altar, baked in the shape of the sun.

Colors: Red, orange, gold, yellow, citrine, green, grey and light brown.

Gemstones: Yellow diamonds, aventurine, sardonyx, peridot and citrine.

Herbs: Acacia flowers, aloes, chamomile, cornstalks, cyclamen, fenugreek, frankincense, heather, hollyhock, myrtle, oak leaves, passionflower, rose, rose hips, rosemary, sandalwood, sunflowers and wheat.

Gods and goddesses: Lugh, Thor, John Barleycorn (the personification of malt liquor), Demeter, Danu, Ceres, sun gods, corn mothers, all grain and agriculture deities, mother goddesses and father gods.

Customs and myths: Spellwork for prosperity, abundance and good fortune are especially appropriate now, as well as spells for connectedness, career, health and financial gain. Sacrifice is often associated with this holiday. Visits to fields, orchards, lakes and wells are also traditional. It is considered taboo not to share your food with others now.

Activities appropriate for this time of the year are baking bread, wheat weaving and making corn dollies or other god and goddess symbols. You may want to string Indian corn on black thread to make a necklace, or bake cornbread sticks shaped like little ears of corn for your Sabbat cakes. The corn dolly may be used both as a fertility amulet and as an altar centerpiece.

Some pagans bake Lammas bread in the form of a god-figure or sun wheel — if you do this, be sure to use this bread in your Lammas ritual’s cakes and ale ceremony, if you have one. During the Lammas ritual, some consume bread or something from the first harvest. Some gather first fruits; others symbolically throw pieces of bread into a fire.