Today's Tarot Card for September 10th is The Hanged Man

The Hanged Man

Tuesday, Sep 10th, 2013

 

 

 

 

Traditionally, the card known as the Hanged Man usually indicates a lack of ability to help oneself through independent action. This energy is arrested and awaiting judgment. With this card, there is no avenue for the will to regain control until the situation has passed.

This represents a good time to be philosophical, to study and meditate upon the position you find yourself in, and form resolutions for the moment you become free again. Only those who possess wisdom, patience and optimism will be able to see through limitations, including possible humiliation, to grasp the inspiring lesson one can gain from such an experience.

Daily Feng Shui Tip for October 1 – ‘World Day of Bullying Prevention’

I know from past feedback that today’s tip absolutely works to push bullies to the side. So let’s spice up ‘World Day of Bullying Prevention’ by embracing an ancient technique. In certain Eastern and Oriental cultures, cinnamon is considered the ‘warm brown spice of friendship’ that also packs the power to fend off bullies. It is said that this spice bestows protection and strength while also destroying ‘enemies.’ A pinch in a pocket or a bit sprinkled inside a wallet (or anywhere else) will employ powers of protection that can conquer all kinds of fear. Now, that’s sweet!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

Your Charm for September 22 is Capricornus – The Goat

Your Charm for Today

Today’s Meaning:

This aspect of your life will be strongly influenced by a person who is practical, prudent, ambitious, disciplined, patient, careful, humorous and reserved. They could be someone you know in the medical field–a nurse or doctor perhaps.

General Description:  

Tenth sign of the Zodiac, Dec 22nd to Jan 19th. Ruling planet, Saturn; correct metal, lead. Those born under Capricornus influence were believed to be prudent, deep thinkers, prosperous in financial affairs, generous, with strong and forcible tempers. The Capricorn stone is the Ruby. The Ruby was a favorite talisman in the Orient. In India it was worn to guard against attacks of enemies, foretell danger, supposed to change color in presence of poison, and attract friends and good fortune; China and Japan health, Happiness and long life. The Romans believed that the Ruby preserved health and strength, averted danger, plague and fevers.

The Call Of The Air Dragons

The Call Of The Air Dragons

You can call upon air dragons in the spring or whenever you need positive change or fresh energies in your life. You can also invoke their strength when rain is needed either in a particular area of the country or world or when you need rain in your life after a stagnant, arid period (in terms of relationships, work or creativity). Oriental weather dragons are also potent for any form of healing. Their healing powers were found as small pearls after the rain, and red sage is said to grow where dragons rested on the earth.

They assist any artistic or creative venture and will wash away or stir the winds to carry off anything that is no longer making you happy or has run its course. Call the weather dragons whenever you are feeling stifled, whether by physical overcrowding or possessiveness.

Dragons love strings of bells or the Tibetan pairs of bells (mini cymbals you can clash together to stir the powers). Alternatively, buy a rain stick (long, wooden tubes containing beads or seed with spikes inside to create the rhythm). You can buy these in all sizes in any ethnic craft store or on the Internet, and can also use them for rain magick. Write your own dragon call if mine does not feel right for you.

Find an open space away from trees. The center of a lawn in your garden is fine but you can create your dragon call in different places in order to sense different dragon energies.

In time you can internalize the process and call for space in a crowded train. I sometimes visualize the call ritual if I am overloaded with luggage, as I was overloaded with luggage due to my working trips.

Tie long scarves to your wrists and one round your neck that will swirl as you move. You may even find scarves with a dragon design.

Picture your dragons, swirling blues and yellows, rising and swooping like Chinese kites on the breeze.

To begin, shake your rain stick three times, make three sounds with your Tibetan bells, shake your string of bells three times or clap loudly three times to stir the air.Call out:

Dragon of the skies, rise.

Dragon of the skies, rise.

Dragon of the skies, rise, if so is right to be.

Still holding your instrument or, if you are not using one, clap as you move round the area in spirals. You can modify the movements, scarves, etc., if people are around, but try to find a quiet time and place to get the full effect at least once.

Call as you move and play or clap:

Dragons, rise.

From earth to skies,

Dragon share with me,

your pearls of immortality,

that I may be free,

Dragons of the skies.

Continue moving faster, shaking or clapping and calling louder, until you feel the air dragon strength, vitality and creativity stirring within you.

When you feel filled with confidence and optimism, on the final word “free” give a final single loud shake of your rain stick, bells or a last clap.

SIt down wherever you are and shake your hands with the scarves attached to release any excess dragon power.

Quietly thank the dragons and leave a single small mother of pearl or pearl button or earring as an offering to be found by someone to whom it would give pleasure.

When you get home hand the scarves near an open window to absorb any breeze and wear one whenever you need creativity or space.

Repeat the dragon call whenever stagnation returns.

Dragons of Wind, Storm and Weather

Dragons of Wind, Storm and Weather

 

 

Dragons of wind and storm and weather in general belong to a subspecies of Air dragons. They are long, slender dragons, some of them with great gauzy wings, others with the Oriental “flying-lump” on their foreheads. Down the spine of the back flutter thin fringes of membrane tissue. They tend to be pale yellows and blues, but change to angry red-orange, purple, or black when they call up storms. Long, feathery antennae rise above their eye ridges.

Dragons of wind, storm, and weather are excellent helpers to control excesses in the weather; get things moving in your life, especially in the areas of creativity and the mental processes; protection; flexibility of the mind; openness to new ideas; sweeping away obstacles, most often in a dramatic fashion.

Sometimes these dragons have feather-looking scales that surround their eyes and necks. Such a dragon was the British Henham dragon, which was well documented in 1669. It as described as being only about nine feet long with small wings and rather curious eyes surrounded by “feathers.” The Henham dragon put in repeated appearance before a great number of observers for several years before it disappeared.

These dragons inhabit cloud banks or very high mountain peaks where the winds never cease. Some Oriental weather dragons live in pools and ponds. They are in almost constant motion, riding the breezy air currents or roaring along with a whistling gales. Sometimes two or more of them join forces, either in play or a temporary dispute, thereby creating tornadoes and hurricanes. When they roll together, lightning and thunder occur.

The ancient Chinese writer Wang Fu wrote that dragons scream like struck copper basins when rain is near. Their breath became clouds. After the fourth month of Summer, the dragons were said to divide the land into territorial sections, thus accounting for the wide diversity of weather in any given region. The Chinese believed that careful observation of dragon activity in the skies could predict the future and the weather. For instance, dragons fighting each other was an omen of a rough journey or approaching storms.

Chinese tradition says that the cry of a male dragon makes the wind rise, while the cry of the female makes it calm again. Their mid-air mating, which is more frequent than with Western dragons, causes great storms and downpours of rain.

The Chinese celestial dragon with the name of Fei Lin was said to appear as a dragon with a bird’s head, deer’s horns and a snake’s tail. The Chinese still hold dragon processions to mark their New Year and to ask for rain and fertility. These festivals are accompanied by lots of noise and dancing to give the dragon and spring a good welcome.

The greatest and Lord of all Dragons was the Celestial Lung. He was different from others of his species as he had five claws on each foot instead of the usual four and had a pair of wings, something missing from most Oriental dragons. He appears to have been a dual-element dragon, since he lived in the sky during the spring and summer and in the ocean during the autumn and winter. Celestial Lung had power over the fertility of all creatures and the land itself. He appointed other Oriental dragons to control areas of human activities, such as music, literature, the military, bridge building, law and architecture.

Many of the Celtic intertwined serpent-dragons were of the Air Element. Above the gate of Kilmainham jail in Dublin can still be seen a large carving of entwined Celtic serpent-dragons. The Danish Ringerike style of carving shows the same kind of dragon. These carved, twisting shapes are full of energy, giving the illusion of constant movement. A Buckle from the Sutton Hoo burial site also portrays these aerial serpent-dragons.

Janet Hoult, in her book “Dragons: Their History & Symbolism (Gothic Image, 1990)” tells of seeing such an aerial display of these dragons above the houses in London. She describes it as a fiery ball of golden “serpents” which looped and writhed around each other in a strange dance in the morning skies.

When the Ringerike style went out of fashion in the Middle Ages and dragons began to be more realistically portrayed, this looping movement was retained in at least the tail if no other part of the body. Since even the vilified Christian dragons had at least one loop in their tails, this may have been a symbol for the great and limitless energy of dragons.

Although one does not usually think of the Australian Rainbow Serpent as being a dragon,, it falls into the category of both weather and water dragons. The Rainbow Serpent is known as a rainmaker in Australia, North America, and West Africa. The Australians say that when the rainbows arch across the land, the Rainbow Serpent is traveling from one water hole or water course to another.

From the deserts of Arizona to the peaks of the Andes, the great Feathered or Plumed Serpent Quetzalcoatl was known as a kindly benefactor and rainmaker. When he arched himself across the heavens, he was an awesome sight, with multicolored scales and bright feathers about his neck and head. When he appeared among his human followers, he chosen the form of a handsome young man attired in a cloak of feathers from the quetzal bird. Quetzalcoatl was the god of win, creator of all life forms, the loving father who produced fertility and ample rain. He taught humans the arts and crafts of civilization and gave them the gift of fire. When Tezcatlipoca, god of war, turned the people to sacrificing living human hearts, Quetzalcoatl left the land.

Even in the British Isles, there are still a few remnants of ancient dragons processions for good spring weather. At one time there were a great many suck festivals. Most of the significance has been lost because of the extreme propaganda by the church. In Britain many of the dragon figures carried in the processions have been destroyed. One of the very few remaining is carried each May as part of the Helston Furry Dance. Two very old dragon effigies now hang in the Castle Museum at Norwich. The Civic Snap, which is the older of the two, dates from about 1795; the Pockthorpe Snap was made by the people of a neighboring village.

Throughout the Middle Ages, these dragons effigies for the spring festivals were very elaborate. They had wings that flapped, horseshoes for gums that made a clacking noise as their mouths opened and closed, and gun powder that made them belch smoke and fire. They were painted in bright colors and quickly became the centerpiece and most popular part of the processions.


In Central and South American and the Caribbean there was a dragon called Huracan; hurricanes were named after him. He was also responsible for earthquakes. In Olmec and Mayan carving of Huracan, he is shown with two forelegs one crooked up , the other down, to suggest his spinning movement. He has only one hind leg the destructive leg that sweeps across the Earth. Other carvings show a man sitting inside what was called Dragon-mouth Cave, and identify this person as Huracan’s brother; it is more likely an initiate. Dragon-mouth Cave has the dragon’s eye on its top with the dragon’s flaming eyebrows; the pupil of the eye is an X. Out of the cave mouth issues clouds of mist-laden breath, a symbol of both rain and the fertility of spirit. Carved near this cave mouth are four sets of concentric circle, the South American sign of precious jade-water (spiritual moisture or blessings).

In ancient Greek culture Typhon was one of the children of the Goddess Gaea and Tartarus. He created powerful, destructive whirlwinds called typhoons. He was pictured with a human body, legs of coiling serpents, a hundred dragons’ heads and many wings. Fire glittered from his many eyes.

This subspecies of dragons is petitioned for weather changes, such as bringing rain, abating a storm or calming wind. Obviously, the magician cannot collect any substance from their dwelling places, but he can entice them by using a small drum and the gong or bell to draw their attention. Wind chimes and winds socks also attract them. The magician can easily work outside with this dragon force. However, do not go outside, particularly under trees or with any metal objects, during a thunderstorm! Such action can be potentially dangerous, because lightning could strike you.

Chant while beating the drum or striking the gong with a slow, steady beat:

THE WINDS ARE HOWLING THROUGH THE TREES.
THE CLOUDS ARE RACING ‘CROSS THE SKY.
THE WEATHER IS CHANGING ONCE AGAIN.
GREAT DRAGONS ARE PASSING BY.
BY THOUGHT I FOLLOW YOUR AIRY DANCE
THROUGH MOUNTAINS OF CLOUDS ABOVE SO HIGH,
BRING US GOOD WEATHER FOR THIS LAND.
GREAT DRAGONS, PASS ON BY.

Dragon Magick

Dragon Magick

 
 
Western and Eastern European and Scandinavian dragons are the true fire dragons. They are primarily guardians of gold, described as the life blood of the earth, and live in caves. The Oriental dragons are mainly air and water dragons, associated with life-giving rain, with winds and storms and with gems and pearls, through there are the fiery kinds as well, as seen in processions.
 
Dragon magick uses the spiritual power associated with fire-breathing dragons to protect your own particular treasures. These treasures might be tangible ones like your home or your family. Less tangibly, treasure to you might represent speaking the truth or receiving honesty from others, the power to develop your career or heaing powers, or the ability to love or gain knowledge. Dragon magick is also good way of manifesting prosperity in your life, not for its own sake but in order to have the resources to do all the things you want to – and so that you don’t need to worry and can bring happiness to others.
 
For despite their bad press in Christian times as symbols of the earth mother, dragons are essentially wise and noble. Of course, physical dragons don’t exist. By means of visualization however, you can build up a connection the huge energy field of the dragon that exist spiritually, the same way the love and altruism are real.
 
Fire dragons are variously described as possessing all or some of the following: eagles’ feet, bat-like wings, the front legs of a lion, a reptile or dinosaur’s head with a huge mouth and teeth from which smoke and fire pours, huge scales, the horns of an antelope, a soft underbelly and a spade-like snake or lizard-like tail that may being close to the head.
 
Smaller fire drakes, found in the myths of France and Germany, don’t have wings, but are red and have fiery breath. They live in caves with their great hoards, the riches of the earth.
 
According to Bulgarian dragon lore, the male dragon is the fiery one and is a benign protector of humans and the crops, in contrast to his watery and less well-disposed sister. In this tradition, dragons have three heads and wings.
 
The ruler of the fire dragons is called Fafnir, whose name comes from the Norse and German culture. He was once a dwarf but was transformed into a dragon because of his love of the treasures he created and the metals he forged. He was killed by Sigrid Volsungr or Siegfried who burned himself, licked his fingers and so absorbed the dragon’s power to commune with the birds.
 
This isn’t a straightforward legend and has a lot to do with the overcoming of the earlier earth goddess power as typified by the dragons. Therefore, Fafnir shouldn’t be thought of as a greedy dwarf who became a dragon to be slain, as in the patriarchal, monk-recorded legends. Rather, Fafnir is lord of the dragons, who guards from the greedy and insensitive the power of the hidden treasures, whether these be of the goddess or your own potential. So if you do include Fafnir in your dragon chants recall his wonderful craftsmanship and how he conserves the minerals of the earth – not a bad lesson for modern times.

Dragon Magick

Dragon Magick

 
 
Western and Eastern European and Scandinavian dragons are the true fire dragons. They are primarily guardians of gold, described as the life blood of the earth, and live in caves. The Oriental dragons are mainly air and water dragons, associated with life-giving rain, with winds and storms and with gems and pearls, through there are the fiery kinds as well, as seen in processions.
 
Dragon magick uses the spiritual power associated with fire-breathing dragons to protect your own particular treasures. These treasures might be tangible ones like your home or your family. Less tangibly, treasure to you might represent speaking the truth or receiving honesty from others, the power to develop your career or heaing powers, or the ability to love or gain knowledge. Dragon magick is also good way of manifesting prosperity in your life, not for its own sake but in order to have the resources to do all the things you want to – and so that you don’t need to worry and can bring happiness to others.
 
For despite their bad press in Christian times as symbols of the earth mother, dragons are essentially wise and noble. Of course, physical dragons don’t exist. By means of visualization however, you can build up a connection the huge energy field of the dragon that exist spiritually, the same way the love and altruism are real.
 
Fire dragons are variously described as possessing all or some of the following: eagles’ feet, bat-like wings, the front legs of a lion, a reptile or dinosaur’s head with a huge mouth and teeth from which smoke and fire pours, huge scales, the horns of an antelope, a soft underbelly and a spade-like snake or lizard-like tail that may being close to the head.
 
Smaller fire drakes, found in the myths of France and Germany, don’t have wings, but are red and have fiery breath. They live in caves with their great hoards, the riches of the earth.
 
According to Bulgarian dragon lore, the male dragon is the fiery one and is a benign protector of humans and the crops, in contrast to his watery and less well-disposed sister. In this tradition, dragons have three heads and wings.
 
The ruler of the fire dragons is called Fafnir, whose name comes from the Norse and German culture. He was once a dwarf but was transformed into a dragon because of his love of the treasures he created and the metals he forged. He was killed by Sigrid Volsungr or Siegfried who burned himself, licked his fingers and so absorbed the dragon’s power to commune with the birds.
 
This isn’t a straightforward legend and has a lot to do with the overcoming of the earlier earth goddess power as typified by the dragons. Therefore, Fafnir shouldn’t be thought of as a greedy dwarf who became a dragon to be slain, as in the patriarchal, monk-recorded legends. Rather, Fafnir is lord of the dragons, who guards from the greedy and insensitive the power of the hidden treasures, whether these be of the goddess or your own potential. So if you do include Fafnir in your dragon chants recall his wonderful craftsmanship and how he conserves the minerals of the earth – not a bad lesson for modern times.

Northern Dragons

Northern Dragons 

Probably the greatest of Northern dragons was Nidhogg (Dread Biter) who lived in Niflheim and was constantly gnawing at the World Tree. Nidhogg would be classified as a chaos dragon, one who destroys in order to re-create. This idea of destruction-resurrection extended to the Norse belief that Nidhogg stripped all corpses of their flesh.

In the Northern regions, dragons were said to live in cold seas or misty lakes, storms and fogs. When these were not available, dragons lurked in deep underground caverns, coming out when hungry or when there was a thunderstorm. Even after conversion to Christianity, the Scandinavians, especially the Norwegians, placed carved dragon heads on the gables of their churches to guard against the elements, as for years they had guarded their ships with dragon-headed prows.

In the original legends of Scotland, Scandinavia, and northern Germany, dragons were not winged, nor were they totally evil. Up until the early Middle Ages, it was reported that flights of dragons were as common as migrating birds. By the Middle Ages when the Christians had grabbed control of nearby everything and were fanatically persecuting Pagans, they changed the ideas of dragons into winged monsters, always menacing and evil, some with multiple heads. They described some of them as having the throat and legs of an eagle, the body of a huge serpent, the wings of the bat, and a tail with a arrow tip; we now call these two-legged dragons wyverns. Christianity was quick to equate dragons with their Devil and their Hell. The Christians also portrayed all non-Christian rulers as evil, destructive dragons.

There are many Christian references to dragons, all of them negative, which generally speaking meant “down with Pagan ideas.” One such tale is told in the book of Bel and the Dragon in the Apocrypha: another is described in the book of Daniel. Christian tales of saints and dragons always picture the dragon losing. The Christians want you to believe that they have killed dragon power, but this is not so. They have not, and never will destroy magick or the wily, elusive dragon.

Christianity and its admonition to hunt down and destroy dragons brought about the end of common dragon sightings, for these great and knowledgeable beasts withdrew from the physical plane, especially in Britain, and Europe. In the Orient dragons were never subjected to the malicious hunting practices of Europe and so continued to involve themselves in human and cosmic affairs. Oriental dragons, being as a whole gregarious extroverts, having generally been treated with much more respect and honor than other dragons.

In Mexico the dragons of the Olmecs were pictured with the body of a rattlesnake, the eyebrows of a jaguar, and feathers. This combination of serpent-jaguar-dragon was common among the civilizations of Mexico, Central America, and certain portions of South America. This combined sinuous and hungry form symbolized the ambiguities of the universe, the process of destruction and re-creation, subconsciously understood by even the most primitive people. Although these cultures were primitive by our standards, they were certainly not without knowledge, cultural advancements, and scientific studies. After their own fashion, they were very spiritual people, who would have been perfectly capable of discovering dragon power; their strange half-dragon, half-jaguar carvings represent their understanding and acknowledgement of the dragons of their continent. Quetzalcoatl, the Feathered Serpent, a dragon serpent figure known and revered over much of the area, bore many of the same characteristics as Oriental dragons.

“Dancing with Dragons”

D. J. Conway

Chinese Dragons

Chinese Dragons

In China, for instance, dragons are portrayed with four legs, a long sinuous serpentine body and a snake-like tail; they ranged in size from a few feet long up to the Great Chien-Tang who was over a thousand feet in length. They could speak, were able to alter their forms and sizes and had a varying number of claws.

Chinese emperors adopted the five-clawed dragon as a sacred ancestor, symbol of their power. Only Imperial dragons were said to have the special five claws on each foot. All other Oriental dragons had only three or four claws. It became a law that only the Emperor could have a five-clawed dragon embroidered on his robes or painted on anything.

According to tradition, China’s history dates back to 3000 b.c.e., although modern historians only goes back to 1600 b.c.e. A clay vessel from about 2000 b.c.e., is decorated with a dragon picture. The dragon symbol and figured still exist in modern-day Chinese art and celebrations.

The Chinese divided their dragons into groups or classes, each with different characteristics. There were four major Lung Wang dragons, or Dragon-Kings. The names of these brothers were Ao Kuang, Ao Jun, Ao Shun, and Ao Ch’in. They also had specific duties: the t’ien lung supported the mansion of the gods; the shen lung brought rain; the ti lung controlled the rivers; and the fu-ts’an lung guarded hidden treasures and deposits of precious metals. The Lung Wang or Dragon Kings, resembled the Indian Nagas, or sacred serpents. They were the patron deities of rivers, lakes, seas and rain. They had valuable pearls in their throats and lived in magnificent underwater palaces.

Further divisions produced the kiao-lung, or scaled dragon; ying-lung with wings; k’ui-lung with horns; chi’i-lung which was hornless; the p’an-lung which was earth-bound. The ch’i-lung dragon was red, white and green, the k’iu-lung blue. Chinese dragons were also entirely black, white, red or yellow with yellow considered superior.

When it came to using dragons for decoration, there were nine distinct categories; the p’u lao was carved on gongs; the ch’iu nui and pi hsi on fiddles and literature tablets; the pa hsia at the base of stone monuments, the chao feng on the eaves of temples; the ch’in on beams of bridges; the suan ni only on the throne of the Buddha; the yai tzu on the hilts of swords; and the pi han on prison gates.

Chinese experts were said to be able to tell the age of Oriental dragons and their origins by their colors. Yellow dragons were believed to be born from yellow gold a thousand years old; blue dragons from blue gold eight hundred years olds; red, white and black from gold of the same color a thousand years olds.

To the Chinese, dragons could be either male or female. They laid eggs, some of which did not hatch for a thousand years. When a hatching did occur, it was known because of great meteor showers, violent thunderstorms, and great showers of hail.

The number of scales on a dragon was also of importance. Some Ancient dragon experts in China maintained that a true dragon has exactly 81 scales, while others stated that the number was 117. They were never said to be covered with anything except scales. This is characteristic of dragons worldwide.

Chinese dragons were said to have the head of a camel, horns of a stag, eyes of a demon, neck of a snake, scales of a carp, claws of an eagle, feet of a tiger, and ears of a cow. Although, as one can see from ancient pictures, all Oriental dragons did not fit conveniently into this description, they all were said to have a lump on the top of the head. This lump enabled them to fly without wings. Although this flying-lump was considered an essential part of Oriental dragons, it is rare to see it portrayed in pictures.

Oriental dragons could change their forms by intense concentration or when extremely angry. All dragons are said to have the ability to take on human form. One can see reasons behind a draconic being passing as a human; dragons are intensely curious about all things and may wish to directly experience human life from time to time. It is a possibility that, while in such a form, a dragon could contact a human and establish a line of communication that could be continued after the dragon resumed its own form.

The Chinese even had methods of protecting themselves from annoying dragons. It was said that they could be frightened away or controlled by the leaves of the wang plant(or Pride of India), five-colored silk thread, wax, iron, or centipedes. It is difficult to imagine a dragon being deterred by wax or centipedes. Perhaps this idea grew from a single dragon who reacted in fear to these objects, just as some humans fear crawling things, heights, or mice. After all, dragons have very distinct and individual personalities just as we do.

In Chinese medicine, the skin, bones, teeth, and saliva were considered very valuable. Powdered dragon bone was a magickal cure-all. Old medical textbooks are quick to point out that dragons periodically shed their skin and bones, like snakes do. Since the skins glowed in the dark, presumably they were easy to locate. Some of the bones were listed as slightly poisonous and could only be prepared in non-iron utensils. How “bones” could be shed is a mystery unless it is not really bone, but something that looks like it. The shedding and regrowth of teeth is known to occur among certain animals, reptiles, and amphibians.

Dragon saliva was said to be found as a frothy foam on the ground or floating on the water. It was usually deposited during mating or fighting. One Chinese story tells of a great battle just off the coast near a fishing village. The people watched the great dragons rolling in the black clouds and leaping waves for a day and a night. Their echoing roars were clearly heard by all the villagers. The next morning these people set out in all their fishing boats to the place of the battle. They scooped up whole boatloads of dragon saliva that they found floating in huge piles on the ocean.

The blood of Oriental dragons was sometimes red, other times black. Dragon experts said it changed into amber when it soaked into the ground. Wherever dragon blood fell, the ground became incapable of supporting any vegetation. Although the blood was considered dangerous, sometimes deadly, in Oriental myths. European heroes bathed in it to create invulnerability or drank it to become wise. This transformation of the blood into amber could well be alchemical expression of the manifestation of magickal power and elemental energies into a desired physicial result.

Oriental dragons did not figure in Chinese creation myths. Only rarely, and then only by accident, did they come in conflict with the gods or heroes. They tended to mind their own business and keep a benefical attitude toward humans. Oriental dragons had specific duties such as controlling the weather and keeping the land and animal fertile, as well as assignments to help humans learn certain civilized arts. Although dragon parts were widely esteemed in Oriental medicine, these magickal creatures were not hunted down as were Western dragons.

 

“Dancing with Dragons”

D. J. Conway