The Call Of The Air Dragons

The Call Of The Air Dragons

You can call upon air dragons in the spring or whenever you need positive change or fresh energies in your life. You can also invoke their strength when rain is needed either in a particular area of the country or world or when you need rain in your life after a stagnant, arid period (in terms of relationships, work or creativity). Oriental weather dragons are also potent for any form of healing. Their healing powers were found as small pearls after the rain, and red sage is said to grow where dragons rested on the earth.

They assist any artistic or creative venture and will wash away or stir the winds to carry off anything that is no longer making you happy or has run its course. Call the weather dragons whenever you are feeling stifled, whether by physical overcrowding or possessiveness.

Dragons love strings of bells or the Tibetan pairs of bells (mini cymbals you can clash together to stir the powers). Alternatively, buy a rain stick (long, wooden tubes containing beads or seed with spikes inside to create the rhythm). You can buy these in all sizes in any ethnic craft store or on the Internet, and can also use them for rain magick. Write your own dragon call if mine does not feel right for you.

Find an open space away from trees. The center of a lawn in your garden is fine but you can create your dragon call in different places in order to sense different dragon energies.

In time you can internalize the process and call for space in a crowded train. I sometimes visualize the call ritual if I am overloaded with luggage, as I was overloaded with luggage due to my working trips.

Tie long scarves to your wrists and one round your neck that will swirl as you move. You may even find scarves with a dragon design.

Picture your dragons, swirling blues and yellows, rising and swooping like Chinese kites on the breeze.

To begin, shake your rain stick three times, make three sounds with your Tibetan bells, shake your string of bells three times or clap loudly three times to stir the air.Call out:

Dragon of the skies, rise.

Dragon of the skies, rise.

Dragon of the skies, rise, if so is right to be.

Still holding your instrument or, if you are not using one, clap as you move round the area in spirals. You can modify the movements, scarves, etc., if people are around, but try to find a quiet time and place to get the full effect at least once.

Call as you move and play or clap:

Dragons, rise.

From earth to skies,

Dragon share with me,

your pearls of immortality,

that I may be free,

Dragons of the skies.

Continue moving faster, shaking or clapping and calling louder, until you feel the air dragon strength, vitality and creativity stirring within you.

When you feel filled with confidence and optimism, on the final word “free” give a final single loud shake of your rain stick, bells or a last clap.

SIt down wherever you are and shake your hands with the scarves attached to release any excess dragon power.

Quietly thank the dragons and leave a single small mother of pearl or pearl button or earring as an offering to be found by someone to whom it would give pleasure.

When you get home hand the scarves near an open window to absorb any breeze and wear one whenever you need creativity or space.

Repeat the dragon call whenever stagnation returns.

Dragon’s Breath in the Earth

Dragon’s Breath in the Earth

 
 
Many of the old legends speak of killing the dragon. Sometimes, the real meaning of this term is clarified when one is told that the dragon continued to live. Of course, if you are reading Christianized stories of dragons, the dragon is always killed by a faithful saint or hero; this is a less than subtle reference to Christianity “killing” Paganism. But a great many of the legends were in existence long before Christians came along; therefore the term “killing” must mean something far different than destroying your religious rivals.
 
If you look at ancient Egyptian paintings of Horus and his Sun Boat sailing over Apep, sometimes called Apophis, serpent of the Underworld and the dead or winter season, and read the ancient stories of these daily and seasonal voyages, you become aware that the word “killing” has another meaning. The picture show the God Set “staking” or guiding Apep by a series of rods driven into the ground. A similar practice is still used to control or change the Earth’s energy in certain areas of the world in the belief that out-of-control dragon energy adversely affects humans, crops, animals and the land in general.
 
The Chinese emphasized the importance of controlling the “dragon’s breath” in architecture and landscape. This is still a respected belief in Hong Kong and other places having Chinese communities. There are professionals adept at finding imbalances of the dragon’s breath, and they are in demand, not only by home owners, but by businessmen. If a series of unexplained illnesses or misfortunes strike a business, for instance, the owner will go though the ordinary procedure to discover the cause. If there is nothing found, or nothing appears to alleviate the problem, he will send for a person skilled in detecting a disruption of dragon’s breath; this person is called a Feng-shui diviner.
 
A visit to the premises is made. This Feng-shui diviner sometimes uses a special magnetic compass that has as many as 38 concentric rings around the needle. Each ring is divided into special traditional measurements of space and time. The diviner takes sightings along what are called the vains of the dragon. These veins are raised features of the landscape, such as trees, rocks, watercourses, valleys, etc. Within buildings, the diviner considers such things as doorways, halls, the directions of corners, and so on. Any recommendation made by the diviner are implemented with great seriousness. If possible a small garden, aligned in certain ways, is made outside for the dragons of the region. Inside a shine is placed in a particular corner or area to accommodate the reigning draconic being. Dragon images are placed in both the garden and the shrine to honor the dragon, and also to remind it of its good fortune to be recognized and given respect by the human residnets.

Dragon and Weather Magick

Dragon and Weather Magick

 

Chinese dragons are said to have a 4,000 year birth cycle and do not grow their wings to fly until the last thousand years. They are described as having bearded lion’s mane-like faces, 81 or more scales on their back (in multiples of nine, their sacred number) and five huge claws. Japanese dragons only have three claws.

Chinese dragons are made up of the parts of many creatures, including two antlers like horns on their heads. They are depicted in blue, black, white or red and often carry a pearl in their mouth or between their claws. The pearl symbolizes wisdom, the power of healing, fertility and the moon.

Their mating and birthing cycles can cause extremes of weather, whirlwinds, hurricanes and storms that last for many hours, especially when the male dragon stirs up the energies of the newborn dragon (a mere 1,000 years old) as it emerges from its jewel-like egg.

Clouds, mists and fog were believd to be formed from dragon breath and rain was thought to fall as they fought. Rain also was caused if their claws caught in a cloud as they roamed across the skies. If the fighting became too fierce, a storm occurred. Certain powerful dragons could regulate the rainfall to ensure a good harvest and they are still recalled in dragon processions like those held on the Chinese New Year.

Chinese and Japanese dragons are also associated with waters, such as lakes, river and the ocean. The four Japanese dragon kings who control the four seas, are given offering if there is too much or little rain since they, like the Chinese dragons, are believed to have the power to control the weather.

The Chinese New Year Festival

The Chinese New Year is now popularly known as the Spring Festival because it starts from the Beginning of Spring (the first of the twenty-four terms in coordination with the changes of Nature). Its origin is too old to be traced. Several explanations are hanging around. All agree, however, that the word Nian, which in modern Chinese solely means “year”, was originally the name of a monster beast that started to prey on people the night before the beginning of a new year (Do not lose track here: we are talking about the new year in terms of the Chinese calendar).
One legend goes that the beast Nian had a very big mouth that would swallow a great many people with one bite. People were very scared. One day, an old man came to their rescue, offering to subdue Nian. To Nian he said, “I hear say that you are very capable, but can you swallow the other beasts of prey on earth instead of people who are by no means of your worthy opponents?” So, swallow it did many of the beasts of prey on earth that also harassed people and their domestic animals from time to time.

After that, the old man disappeared riding the beast Nian. He turned out to be an immortal god. Now that Nian is gone and other beasts of prey are also scared into forests, people begin to enjoy their peaceful life. Before the old man left, he had told people to put up red paper decorations on their windows and doors at each year’s end to scare away Nian in case it sneaked back again, because red is the color the beast feared the most.

From then on, the tradition of observing the conquest of Nian is carried on from generation to generation. The term “Guo Nian”, which may mean “Survive the Nian” becomes today “Celebrate the (New) Year” as the word “guo” in Chinese having both the meaning of “pass-over” and “observe”. The custom of putting up red paper and firing fire-crackers to scare away Nian should it have a chance to run loose is still around. However, people today have long forgotten why they are doing all this, except that they feel the color and the sound add to the excitement of the celebration.

The Holiday Spot

History of the Chinese New Year

The Chinese New Year has a great history. In our past, people lived in an agricultural society and worked all year long. They only took a break after the harvest and before the planting of seeds. This happens to coincide with the beginning of the lunar New Year.

The Chinese New Year is very similar to the Western one, rich in traditions, folklores and rituals. It has been said that it is a combination of the Western Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year. This is hardly an exaggeration!

The origin of the Chinese New Year itself is centuries old – in fact, too old to actually be traced. It is popularly recognized as the Spring Festival and celebrations last 15 days.

Preparations tend to begin a month before the date of the Chinese New Year (similar to a Western Christmas). During this time people start buying presents, decoration materials, food and clothing. A huge clean-up gets underway days before the New Year, when Chinese houses are cleaned from top to bottom. This ritual is supposed to sweep away all traces of bad luck. Doors and windowpanes are often given a new coat of paint, usually red, then decorated with paper cuts and couplets with themes such as happiness, wealth and longevity printed on them.

The eve of the New Year is perhaps the most exciting part of the holiday, due to the anticipation. Here, traditions and rituals are very carefully observed in everything from food to clothing. Dinner is usually a feast of seafood and dumplings, signifying different good wishes. Delicacies include prawns, for liveliness and happiness, dried oysters ( ho xi), for all things good, fish dishes or Yau-Yu to bring good luck and prosperity, Fai-chai (Angel Hair), an edible hair-like seaweed to bring prosperity, and dumplings boiled in water (Jiaozi) signifying a long-lasting good wish for a family. It is customary to wear something red as this colour is meant to ward off evil spirits. But black and white are frowned upon, as these are associated with mourning. After dinner, families sit up for the night playing cards, board games or watching television programmes dedicated to the occasion. At midnight, fireworks light up the sky.

On the day itself, an ancient custom called Hong Bao, meaning Red Packet, takes place. This involves married couples giving children and unmarried adults money in red envelopes. Then the family begins to say greetings from door to door, first to their relatives and then to their neighbours. Like the Western saying “let bygones be bygones,” at Chinese New Year, grudges are very easily cast aside.

Tributes are made to ancestors by burning incense and the symbolic offering of foods. As firecrackers burst in the air, evil spirits are scared away by the sound of the explosions.

The end of the New Year is marked by the Festival of Lanterns, which is a celebration with singing, dancing and lantern shows.

At the Festival, all traditions are honored. The predominant colors are red and gold. “Good Wish” banners are hung from the ceilings and walls. The “God of Fortune” is there to give Hong Baos. Lion dancers perform on stage continuously. Visitors take home plants and flowers symbolizing good luck. An array of New Years specialty food is available in the Food Market. Visitors purchase new clothing, shoes and pottery at the Market Fair. Bargaining for the best deal is commonplace!

The Holiday Spot

Happy Chinese New Year, dear friends! It’s The Year of the Water Dragon!

Wiccan Images, Pictures, Comments
Good morning, dearies! Happy Chinese New Year to All! I tried to find a graphic that fit the occasion, but……there was none to be found. I hope everyone is having a fantastic Monday.  I am feeling pretty good. The Sun is shining in all of its majestic glory. I think everyone feels better when the Sun shines. We had some bad storms come through here last night. I think I was up half the night holding my pup and wildcat (Razzy). Razzy hasn’t experienced a thunderstorm and high winds before. It was something else trying to keep her calm during the storm. But I finally managed it this morning around 4:00. I think she was too tired to care anymore. Of course, I was propped up against a file cabinet going, “cat are you ever going to sleep, Good Grief!” All I know is I woke up still propped up on the cabinet and she was asleep beside me. Considering all that I feel pretty good. I haven’t asked Razzy yet how she feels, lol!

You have a fantastic Monday and Happy Year of the Water Dragon!

 

Today’s Affirmation for Jan. 23rd

“I have a wealth of knowledge and talents. Each day I spend some time in quiet contemplation to allow these riches to emerge.”

 

Today’s Thought for Jan. 23rd

Your Special Gifts

We all have gifts that we may not fully appreciate – unique talents that enrich our esperiences and help us to face the challenges in our lives. Spend time reflecting on them. What personal qualities and creative talents do you have? Perhaps you are empathetic, funny or eloquent, a talented singer or a beautiful dancer. Acknowledge and cherish these unique gifts. Recognize them as blessings bequeathed to you for the benefit and enjoyment of yourself and others.

 

Correspondences for Monday, Jan. 23rd

Magickal Intentions: Psychic Sensitivity, Women’s Mysteries, Tides, Waters, Emotional Issues, Agriculture, Animals, Female Fertility, Messages, Theft, Reconcilliations, Voyages, Dreams and Merchandise
Incense: African Violet, Honeysuckle, Myrtle, Willow, Wormwood
Planet: Moon
Sign: Cancer
Angel: Gabriel
Colors: Silver, White and Gray
Herbs/Plants: Night Flowers, Willow Root, Orris Root, Birch, Motherwort, Vervain, White Rose and White Iris
Stones: Carnelian, Moonstone, Aquamarine, Pearl, Clear Quartz, Flourite, Geodes
Oil: (Moon) Jasmine, Lemon, Sandalwood
Monday belongs to the Moon. Monday’s energy best aligns itself with efforts that deal with women, home and hearth, the family, the garden, travel, and medicine. It also boosts rituals involving psychic development and prophetic dreaming.

 

Spellcrafting for Monday, Jan. 23rd

SPELL TO INCREASE HEALTH AND VITALITY

You will need: quartz crystal
If you have a piece of quartz, first wash it in warm soapy water and rinse it with running water.
Then hold the crystal in both hands. Close your eyes and imagine being bathed in white light.
Visualize the area of your illness and point the crystal to that site. Imagine a stream
of light flowing from the crystal and bathing the area in its pure rays.
Place your crystal under your pillow while you sleep.

Celebrations Around the World, Jan. 22

Erotic Festival Day
Festival of the Orgone
St. Vincent’s Day (patron of winegrowers, schoolgirls, vinegar makers)
Dance of the 7 Veils Day
Festival of Invoking & Banishing
Answer Your Cat’s Question Day
Ukranian Day
Saints Day
National Blond Brownie Day
St. Timothy’s Day (Greek)
Goddess Month of Hestia ends
Munich Ballet Festival begins
Hong Kong Arts Festival begins

Mayan Chronological Estimation: A Good Day For Those Who Walk In The Country.