The Witches Digest for Monday, January 29th (Part 2, The Witches Guide to Mondays)

 

The Witches Digest for Monday, January 29th

(Part 2, The Witches Guide to Mondays)

Today is Monday, January 29th

 

Monday is the sacred day of the moon, personified as the goddesses Selene, Luna, and Mani. The moon is ruler of flow, affecting the changeable and impressionable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, then the powers of the moon are at their most potent.

Deity: Mani

Zodiac Sign: Cancer

Planet: Moon

Tree: Willow

Herb: Chickweed

Stone: Agate

Animal: Crab

Element: Water

Color: Green

Rune: Lagu (L)

 

The Celtic Tree Month of Luis(Rowan) January 21 – February 17)

Runic Half Month of Elhaz (January 28 – February 11)

Goddess of the Month of Bridhe (January 23 – February 19)

 

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick

On Monday, January 29th, We Celebrate the Goddess Minerva

Minerva

The Roman goddess of wisdom and science

Discover the legends and myths and religious beliefs surrounding Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom and science. She was also the Roman goddess of war and arts, such as spinning, weaving and music. She is depicted in art in a standing attitude, completely armed, with a composed but smiling countenance, bearing a golden breast-plate, a spear in her right hand, and the Aegis, a shield in her left, having on it the head of Medusa, entwined with snakes. The Greek counterpart of this ancient Roman deity was Athena.

Minerva in Roman Mythology
Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom and science, featured in many stories, myths and legends in Roman Mythology. Her birth was very mysterious as she is supposed to have sprung, fully grown and completely armed, from the head of Jupiter. This goddess was in the unique position of having a father but no mother. As one of the goddesses of war she was often represented in Roman art with various weapons. She was credited with inventing the chariot, plow, bridle, rake, ox yoke and the flute. The weapons reflected her strategic approach and her preparation for war and were symbols of victory. Her symbol of the olive tree relates to the gift she offered to Cecrops, the first king of Athens during her contest with Neptune.

Facts about Minerva
The following facts and profile provides a fast overview of Minerva:

Minerva Profile & Fact File
Roman Name: Minerva
Role & Function: The function of Minerva is described as being the goddess of wisdom, science, war and arts, such as spinning, weaving and music.
Status: Major Goddess and one of the ‘Dei Consentes’, the Council of Gods.
Symbols: The owl, the snake and the olive tree
Alternative names: Mentor. The name ‘Mentor’ was assumed by Minerva to act as a guide for Telemachus,
Greek Counterpart: The Greek name for this goddess was Athena or Pallas Athena
Name of Father: Jupiter
Name of Mother: None
Names of Children: Unmarried, no children

Goddess Athena

Facts about Minerva in Roman Mythology and History
Discover interesting information and facts about Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom and science. The facts about Minerva provides a list detailing fascinating additional info to increase your knowledge about Minerva in Roman Mythology and history.

History and Mythical Facts about Minerva
Fact 1 about Minerva: She was the daughter of Jupiter, the king of the Roman gods
Fact 2 about Minerva: Although Jupiter alone was most commonly named as her parent however alternative myths give Jupiter and Metis as her father and mother
Fact 3 about Minerva: She was a warlike goddess, and had a controlled strategic approach that brought her success in conflicts.
Fact 4 about Minerva: She was a member of the Capitoline Triad which consisted of three major gods – Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. The most important temples in Rome were dedicated to the triad of gods and situated on the Capitoline Hill.
Fact 5 about Minerva: Her festival was called Quinquatria. It was celebrated on March 19 through to March 23. On the first day of her festival no blood was shed, but that on the last four days there were contests of gladiators.
Fact 6 about Minerva: Her symbol of the owl is closely associated with wisdom and victory
Fact 7 about Minerva: The snake or serpent is often depicted at the feet of the goddess as a symbol of the creative power of wisdom
Fact 8 about Minerva: The god of war, Mars, assisted the armies of Troy in the Trojan war against the Greeks, but was wounded in an encounter with the hero Diomedes and the goddess Minerva
Fact 9 about Minerva: She used wisdom and cunning to help her in her battles and was more successful than Mars, the god of War.
Fact 10 about Minerva: Vulcan fell in love with her but she rejected him with the utmost contempt because of his ugly appearance.
Fact 11 about Minerva: She gave the hero Perseus a mirror-like shield to help in his quests. Perseus went on to slay the terrifying gorgon and gave the head of Medusa to the goddess.
Fact 12 about Minerva: As Minerva Medica, she was the goddess of medicine and doctors.
Fact 13 about Minerva: She is represented holding the Aegis, a shield in her left hand having on it the head of Medusa, entwined with snakes.

Minerva (Greek Counterpart was Athena)
The Romans habitually assimilated various elements from other cultures and civilisations, including the gods and goddesses that were worshipped by the Greeks and other nations. When the Roman Empire conquered the Greeks in 146BC many of the Greek gods and goddesses were adopted by the Romans. The Romans simply changed the Greek gods names to Latin equivalents.

Athena, goddess of Wisdom

The Greek counterpart of Minerva was Athena. The Roman religion significantly differed from the Greeks in that it was officially endorsed by the state and exerted influence over the government of Rome. Politicians took the offices of influential priests, called pontiffs, to gain control of the popular worship, Roman gods and goddesses like Minerva were worshipped at every public event, including the gladiatorial games, where blood sacrifices were made to the gods. In ancient Rome, the pantheon of 12 major gods, including Minerva, were called the ‘Dei Consentes’ meaning the Council of Gods.

Minerva and the Roman Gods Family Tree and Genealogy
The Roman gods family tree provides an instant overview of the genealogy and the family connections and relationships between the main deities, including Minerva, who feature in the legends and mythology of the ancient Romans. The Primeval gods and deities, the Titans and the Roman Olympians.

Interesting information and Facts about the Roman goddess Minerva
Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom and science
Stories and Legends in Roman Mythology associated with the goddess of wisdom and science
Facts and information about the Gods and Deities of the Ancient World for schools and kids
The Roman goddess of wisdom and science

Monday: Keep the moon safe from the wolf

 

Easy to remember – Monday is the Moon Day. The word moon is associated with the Norse god Mona (Máni). He was pulling the moon accross the sky, trying to escape and save it from a mythological wolf. At the end of the world, the wolf will catch them and tear the moon into pieces. This apocalyptic period of the world is called Ragnarok in Norse mythology.

In Romance languages, Monday is also the Moon Day (lunes in Spanish, lundi in French, lunedi in Italian: coming from Latin Dies Lunae).

Ritual Work Associated with Monday The Day of the Moon

 

Perfume: White Poppy, White Rose, Wallflower

Incense: Myrtle

Wood: Willow

Color: Silver, Grey-white

Influences: Agriculture, Domestic, Longlife, Medicine, Travels, Visions, Theft (new moon)

Reference:

A Book of Pagan Rituals
Herman Slater

Monday–The Day of the Moon

The moon, like the sun, was an object of wonder in the days of old, and was worshiped almost everywhere in some form or other, but it does not play quite so important a part in story as the sun. Since the moon is paler than the sun and its light soft and gentle, it was often regarded as being a chariot driven by a woman, but the course of the moon-goddess across the sky was similar to that of the sun-god.

Diana, the moon-goddess of the Greeks and Romans, known also as Cynthia, Phoebe, and Arterms, was the twin-sister of Apollo, and drove a golden chariot drawn by milk-white horses. Diana and Apollo were children of Jupiter, and were born in the Island of Delos, where a temple to Apollo was afterwards built. Another of the Seven Wonders of the World was the temple to Diana at Ephesus, on the west coast of Asia Minor. The worship of Diana at Ephesus is mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles: “And when the town clerk had quieted the multitude, he saith, ‘Ye men of Ephesus, what man is there who knoweth not how that the city of the Ephesians is temple-keeper of the great Diana and of the image which fell down from Jupiter?'” The temple was destroyed in the year A.D. 263, but remains of it may still be seen.

Diana was also the Goddess of Hunting; she was a skilled archer, and spent the day in huuting, as we have seen in the story of Orion.

The most famous story of Diana is that of her love for Endymion, a young shepherd–a story which has been told by the poets many times. One evening as the moon-goddess was driving silently across the sky, she saw sleeping on a hillside a handsome youth, his resting flock scattered over the gentle slope. Attracted by his beauty, Diana stepped from her chariot and gazed long at his face; then softly stooping, she kissed him lightly on the lips. Endymion, half wakened by her touch, caught a fleeting vision of the fair goddess as she hastened to her chariot. Filled with wonder at the sight, he rose quickly and rubbed his eyes, but all he saw was the bright moon floating across the dark sky, and he thought that he had been dreaming. The next night the goddess came to him again, and again he saw her with his half closed eyes. Each night when the bright rays of the moon fell on his upturned face he dreamed this wonderful dream, but he was always sleeping when the goddess came, and nevr saw her in her full and dazzling beauty. The days now seemed long and dreary to Endymion, and he waited anxiously for the night that he might see again the glorious vision.

Diana was filled with dread at the thought that the beautiful youth would lose his beauty as the years went by, and at last she cast a spell over him while he slept, so that he should never wake again, and carried him away to a cave in a mountain-side known only to herself. There the loving Diana paused each night in her journey across the sky, and gazed on the face of the fair Endymion.

Diana, when hunting in the forest, was attended by a band of wood-nymphs who were her faithful followers. One of these nymphs, Arethusa, was one day cooling herself after the chase on the banks of the River Alpheus, when suddenly the God of the River appeared. The startled nymph ran quickly into the woods, but the god Alpheus pursued her, telling her that he loved her and that she need fear no harm. Arethusa was too frightened to listen to the god, and ran on, till at last, worn out, she prayed to Diana for help. The moon-goddess was ever ready to help her faithful nymphs, and in answer to the prayer transformed the girl into a fountain, which she hid in a thick mist. Alpheus, suddenly losing sight of the nymph, wandered sorrowfully about, calling out her name in his distress. Arethusa now thought that she was safe, but the wind-god, Zephyrus, blew aside the mist, and Alpheus saw a fountain where there had not been one before, and guessed what had happened. He quickly changed himself into a river and rushed towards the fountain, but Arethusa sprang from the rocks and hastened away over the stones and grass. Diana now saw her fresh danger, and made an opening in the ground, through which Arethusa slipped, to find herself in the kingdom of Pluto, the God of the Underworld. Here she wandered until she found another opening, by which she escaped once again into the sunshine on the plain of Sicily. Alpheus, however, at last made his way across the sea to Sicily, where he found Arethusa and won her love. The Greeks believed that flowers cast into the River Alpheus in Greece were carried by the river as gifts to his lover, and appeared later in the fountain of Arethusa in Sicily!

Among the Egyptians the moon was regarded as a god, who was named Thoth (The Measurer). He was also the God of Wisdom, Invention, Writing, and Magic. He was one of the earliest of the Egyptian gods, having come into being at the same time as Ra, the sun-god, and it was he who was said to have created the world. The Romans compared him with Mercury because, like Mercury, he invented writing. As the God of the Moon, he was represented as wearing a crescent moon on his head, and holding in his hand a stylus, a pointed instrument used by the Egyptians for writing on their wax tablets.

The Babylonian moon-god was Sin, the Lord of Wisdom. He was the father of the sun-god, and was one of the greatest of the gods, owing to the fact that the Babylonians regulated their calendar by the moon.

The Angles and Saxons believed that the moon was driven across the sky by Mani, the son of a giant, in a golden chariot drawn by a horse named the All Swift. As in the case of the sun, our ancestors had no distinct goddess of the moon; but we shall read of Mani again in a later chapter.

 

Hymn to Diana

Queen and huntress, chaste and fair,
Now the sun is laid to sleep,
Seated in thy silver chair,
State in wonted manner keep:
Hesperus entreats thy light,
Goddess excellently bright.
Earth, let not thy envious shade
Dare itself to interpose;
Cynthia’s shining orb was made
Heaven to clear when day did close;
Bless us then with wished sight,
Goddess excellently bright.
Lay thy bow of pearl apart,
And thy crystal shining quiver;
Give unto the flying hart
Space to breathe, how short soever,
Thou that mak’st a day of night,
Goddess excellently bright.
BEN JONSON–Cynthia’s Revels.

The Witches Monday

In the word Monday, we can see part of the word Moon. In the romance languages such as Italian or Spanish, this day of the week is called Lunes and clearly relates to the word lunar. On Mondays, a variety of magick may be worked. Because Monday centers on the energies of the Moon, things like dreams, feminine energy, health, success in spiritual pursuits, domestic matters, and things of family origin are especially important this day.

Mondays are best for love magick and anything concerning home or family, thus old saying, Mondays child is fair of face, which seems clearly to relate to the themes of love and health.

Angels of Monday are Gabriel, Arcan, Missabu, and Abuzaha. Arcan is known as the king of the angels of air and the “ruler” of Monday. Abuzaha (Abuzohar) serves Monday, and is very responsive to invocations and ritual magick. Missabu is a ministering angel of Arcan.

Check whether the moon is waning or waxing to determine what your spell will be. During waning moons, do spells to rid yourself of obstacles or for wisdom and protection. During waxing moons do magic for increase of any kind or to draw something into your life.

On Mondays, the best hour to work is moonrise. Get this information from your local newspaper, astrological calendar, or almanac.

Source

Gypsy Magic

Monday’s Witchery, Magick and Enchantment

 

Think for a moment on all of the witchery, magick and enchantments that you have discovered. Don’t be afraid to adjust spells to suit your own specific needs. Any gentle, illusory, and dreamy charms and spells can be enhanced when you work on the day of the week that is dedicated to the moon. Mondays are a fantastic day to boost your psychic abilities and to tune in to your intuition and empathy. It also gives you the opportunity to work with a different lunar phase each and every Monday, which means in one month you could work four different types of moon magicks on Mondays. How’s that for adding to your repertoire? You are going to have mad skills in no time at all.

So light up those lunar scented candles and add a little mystique to your outfit by wearing an enchanting lunar color. Wear your sparkling silver jewelry and maybe add a pair of dangling silver earrings or a pendant shaped like a crescent moon. Create lunar potions and philters; make a dream catcher and give it as a gift to someone you love. Burn some sandalwood or jasmine-scented incense today to inspire the glamour and magick of the moon. Slice up a favorite variety of fruit that is in season for a snack or share it with your love and enjoy his or her lunar and romantic qualities. Brew up a cup of chamomile tea, enchant it with a little moon magick, and relax and get a good night’s sleep.

Most importantly, get outside tonight and watch the moon for a while. What phase is she in? What color was the moon as she rose? Why not start a journal and write down at what location the moon rises and sets for a few seasons? This is a great way to teach you to tune in and to become more aware of the moon and the influence that she pulls into our lives. Try calling on Selene for her magickal assistance, and call Thoth for wisdom and strength. Get to know the Norse Mani and the Latvian Meness. These gods of the moon have plenty to teach, and if you allow their influence to cycle through your life, you’ll receive many blessings. Be imaginative, and create your own personal lunar magick and witchery. Go on….the moonlight becomes you.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

The Witches Almanac for Monday, January 29th

Feast of St. Gildas

Waxing Moon

 

Moon phase: Second Quarter

 

Moon Sign: Cancer

 

Incense: Narcissus

 

Color: White

The Witches Correspondences for January 28th

 

Magickal Intentions: Psychic Sensitivity, Women’s Mysteries, Tides, Waters, Emotional Issues, Agriculture, Animals, Female Fertility, Messages, Theft, Reconciliations, Voyages, Dreams and Merchandise

Incense: African violet, Honeysuckle, Myrtle, Willow, Wormwood

Planet: Moon

Sign: Cancer

Angel: Gabriel

Colors: Silver, White and Gray

Herbs/Plants: Night Flowers, Willow Root, Orris Root, Birch, Motherwort, Vervain, White Rose and White Iris

Stones: Carnelian, Moonstone, Aquamarine, Pearl, Clear Quartz, Fluorite, Geodes

Oil: (Moon) Jasmine, Lemon, Sandalwood

Monday belongs to the Moon. Monday’s energy best aligns itself with efforts that deal with women, home and hearth, the family, the garden, travel, and medicine. It also boosts rituals involving psychic development and prophetic dreaming.

 

Monday Is Ruled By the Moon

 

This day of the week is dedicated to the moon and all of her magic and mystery. Mondays are for women’s mysteries, illusion, prophetic dreaming, emotions, travel, and fertility.

Some suggestions for Monday enchantments would include:

*Getting outside and looking for the moon in the heavens. Sit under her light and absorb a little glamour. Call on the moon goddess Selene for practical help in magical issues.

*Invoking the god Thoth for wisdom and insight

*Empowering your silver jewelry under the light of the moon. Wear moonstone or pearl jewelry today to add a lunar and magical shimmer to your outfit.

*Be mysterious and subtle and wear moon-associated colors such as white, silver, and blue.

*Working spells for safe travel with a simple moonstone

*Gathering bluebells, jasmine, gardenias, or white roses to create a little garden witchery with the flowers that are associated with the moon

*Setting up a lunar Tarot spell today to increase your psychic powers

*Eating a lunar fruit such as a melon to be healthy, serene, and at peace

*Brewing up a cup of chamomile or mint tea and enchanting it for sweet dreams and restful sleep

The Energy of the Moon

Planet: Moon

Day: Monday

Color: Silver, white, light blue, purple

Metal: Silver

Associations: Childbearing and family life, purity and virginity, healing, wisdom, intuition

MAGICKAL APPLICATIONS FOR MONDAY

 

Monday is named after the moon. The Latin term for Monday is Dies Lunae (“moon’s day”); in the Old English language, this day was Monandaeg; in Greek, it was Hermera Selenes. All of these different names and languages translate to the same thing: the “day of the moon.”

Working with the different phases of the moon is an important skill that takes a bit of time for Witches to learn. So why not cut to the chase and experiment with the day of the week that is dedicated to the moon in all of its magickal energies and aspects?

Magickally, Monday encourages the lunar energies of inspiration, illusion, prophetic dreams, emotions, psychic abilities, travel, women’s mysteries, and fertility.

Source

–Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week

Ellen Dugan

Monday & The Perfect Corresponding Spell

The Spell of the Magus

 

Try working this spell on a Monday while both the moon and the sun are in the sky at the same time. During certain phases of the waning moon, the moon can be seen in the morning sky (or in the new to waxing moon phase, in the evening sky just before the sun sets). This time-when both the sun and the moon are visible in the sky-is believed to be a time of incredible magickal power.

Choose a small pillar style of white candle. Inscribe the candle with a lunar symbol. Anoint the candle with sandalwood oil to increase your spirituality. Next, light the white candle and place it in a candle holder on a safe, flat surface. Gather a few almonds in a dish off to the side of the candle holder. Almonds are sacred to Thoth and are thought to grant wisdom. Note: If you are allergic to nuts, then substitute a white wintergreen-flavored mint.

Wintergreen is also associated with the moon. Repeat the spell below three times:

Thoth, Egyptian god of wisdom and of the moon so white

Hear my call: grant me might and power on this special night

Honor and integrity creates its own power

Grant me wisdom and strength in this magickal hour.

At the final repetition of the spell, eat the almonds/mint, then close the spell by saying:

As I consume these nuts/this mint, I take into myself the wisdom and benevolence of Thoth For the good of all, with harm to none By the moon and stars, this spell is done.

Keep an eye on the candle; let it burn until it goes out on its own. Meditate on the old saying that with great power comes great responsibility. Be sure you are fair and wise in all of your magickal actions. If you are unsure of your motives, then contemplate Thoth, use your imagination, and see what he has to tell you.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week

Ellen Dugan

The Dark Night of the Soul

“The Dark Night of the Soul” is the name given to that experience of spiritual desolation that all students of the Occult pass through at
one time or another. It is sometimes characterized by feelings that your occult studies or practices are not taken you anywhere, that the initial success that one is sometimes granted after a few months of occult working, has suddenly dried up. There comes a desire to give up on everything, to abandon exercises and meditation, as nothing seems to be working. St.John of the Cross. a christian mystic, said of this experience, that it; “…puts the sensory spiritual appetites to sleep, deadens them, and deprives them of the ability to find pleasure in anything. It binds the imagination, and impedes it from doing any good discursive work. It makes the memory cease, the intellect become dark and unable to understand anything, and hence it causes the will to become arid and constrained, and all the faculties empty and useless. And over this hangs a dense and burdensome cloud, which afflicts the soul, and keeps it withdrawn from the good.”

Though the beginner may view the onset of such an experience with alarm (I know I did), the “Dark Night” is not something bad or destructive. In one sense it may be seen as a trial, a test by which the Gods examine our resolve to continue with occult work, and if you are not completely whole-hearted about your magical studies, it is during this period (at its beginning) that you will give up.

The Dark Night of the Soul should be welcomed, once recognized for what it is (I have always received an innate “warning” just before the onset of such a period), as a person might welcome an operation that will secure health and well-being. St.John of the Cross embraced the soul`s Dark Night as a Divine Appointment, calling it a period of “sheer grace” and adding;
“O guiding Night,
O Night more lovely than Dawn,
O Night that has united the lover with his beloved
Transforming the Lover in her Beloved.”

When entering the Dark Night one is overcome by a sense of spiritual dryness and depression. The notion, in some quarters, that all such experiences should be avoided, for a peaceful existence, shows up the superficiality of so much of contemporary living. The Dark Night is a way of bringing the Soul to stillness, so that deep psychic transformation may take place. All distractions must be set aside, and it is no good attempting to fight or channel the bursts of raw energy that from time to time may course through your being. This inner compulsion to set everything aside results in the outer depression, when nothing seems to excite.

The only thing to do is obey your inner voice and become still, waiting for the inner transformation, (which the “Dark Night” heralds), to take place. You may not be aware for a very long time of the results of that inner change, but when the desire to work comes again and the depression lifts, the Dark Night has (for a moment) passed. No one can help during this time, and in many cases there is hardly anyone to turn for advice. One must disregard the well-meaning advice of family and friends to “snap out of it” this is no ordinary depression, but a deep spiritual experience which only those who have passed through themselves (in other words to a magical retreat) but for many, as the routines of everyday life prohibits this, all you can do is cultivate an inner solitude, a stillness and silence of heart, and wait, (like a chrysalis waits for the inner changes that will result in a butterfly) for the Transformation to work itself out. There are many such “Dark Nights” that the occult seeker must pass through during the mysterious process of mitigation. They are all trials but experience teaches one to cope more efficiently.

—-Fra.: Apfelmann, Author

Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days A Year

January 28th – 29th

Up-Helly-Aa

Up-Helly-Aa is a centuries-old fire festival held in the Shetland Islands. It is derived from the ancient Yuletide festival celebrating the triumph of the sun over darkness and winter, and it pays

tribute to the ancient Viking Gods and Goddesses. The festival began with torch light processions that ignited giant bonfires and culminated with the burning of a replica of a Viking ship. It was believed that the fire would dispel evil spirits from the villagers and their homes. The festivities usually ended with great feasting and dancing until dawn.

Magickal Activity for January 28th – 29th the Day of Up-Helly-Aa

Personal Cleansing

 

This simple rite is based on the power of the Nordic rune sol (sun), the nurturing potentials of the north that are believed to banish, and gently destroy the forces of restriction and constraint. This is especially critical during the shift from darkness to light-from the old to the new.

Items needed: The rune sol, inscribed with red ink or paint on a piece of heavy construction paper or card stock; one fireproof dish with handles to which is added 1/4 cup table salt; one cup 150-percent grain alcohol; six drops Frankincense oil.

Place all the necessary items on your altar. Set the rune next to the fire proof dish containing the salt, alcohol, and oil. Light the alcohol mixture. As it burns, visualize it cleansing the mind and body as you chant:

Dark forces fade into night,
But not the power of the sun.
All be cleansed with the power of light,
For now a new time has begun.

As soon as the fire burns out, pick up the rune, kiss it, and then hang it over the main entrance of your home. Each time you pass beneath the rune, its power will strengthen and energize your mind and body.

 

Up next, my sweets…..

Your Daily Horoscopes and Tarot, Runes & Much More

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