The Witches Digest for Monday, January 8 (Part 1)

Enchanted Princess of the Winter
The Witches Digest for Monday, January 8

(Part 1)

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The Coven Spell

O ancient ones of heaven, earth and sea,
We chant the coven spell, thus shall it be!
To music of the night-wind blowing free,
We chant the coven spell, thus shall it be!

 

The owl hoots within the hollow tree,
The black cat runs by night silently,
The toad beneath the stone dwells secretly,
We chant the coven spell, thus shall it be!

 

To moon that draws the tides of air and sea,
We chant the coven spell, thus shall it be!
To god that bides beneath the greenwood tree,
We chant the coven spell, thus shall it be!

 

By witches’ garter bound about the knee,
By staff and cauldron and all powers that be,
We will the thing in our minds we see,
We chant the coven spell, thus shall it be!

 

The Spell is flowing like the sea,
The spell is growing like the tree,
Like flame that burns and blazes free.
We chant the spell, thus shall it be!
We chant the spell, thus shall it be!
We chant the spell, thus shall it be!
IT IS!

Source
Doreen Valiente
“Witchcraft For Tomorrow” pp. 181-182
Published on PaganLibrary

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How Much Do You Really Know About the Month of January–The Month of Janus

 

The first month was called Januarius by the Romans, after Janus, the god of doors and gates. We see the same word in janua, the Latin for a gate or opening. From the idea that a door is a way in, an entrance, it became a custom among the Romans to pray to Janus whenever they undertook a new work. He was also the god of the beginning of the day, and it was only natural that when a new month was added at the beginning of the year it should be named after him. During this month offerings to the god were made of meal, frankincense, and wine, each of which had to be quite new.

 

Since a gate opens both ways, Janus was thought to be able to see back into the past, and forward into the future, and he was usually represented in pictures as having a double head that looked both ways. On the earliest Roman coins he is drawn with two bearded faces, with a staff in one hand, and a key in the other, He was also the protector of trade and shipping, and on some coins his head is shown with the prow of a ship. When people wished to picture him as the god of the year, they drew him holding the number 300 in one hand, and 65 in the other.

 

Janus was worshiped on the Janiculum (Hill of Janus), one of the seven hills on which Rome was built. Since he was the God of Gates, all the gates of Rome were under his care, especially the archway through which the army marched to war, and by which it returned. This archway was afterwards replaced by a temple which was called Janus Quadrifrons–that is, four-sided–because it was square. On each side of the building there were three windows and one door, making twelve windows and four doors, which represented the twelve months and the four seasons. In times of war the temple gates were kept wide open since people were continually making offerings to the god, but whenever there came a time of peace, the gates were at once closed. As we know the Romans were continually fighting, it does not surprise us to find that the gates of the temple were closed only three times in seven hundred years.

 

Janus was said to be the son of Apollo, the God of the Sun, whose daily task it was to drive across the sky in his chariot of fire. Each morning when Aurora, the Goddess of the Dawn, had opened the gates of the East, Apollo set forth, and when, his task accomplished, he reached the Western Ocean, he returned to his palace in the East.

 

“And the gilded car of day
His glowing axle doth allay
In the steep Atlantic stream:
And the slope sun his upward beam
Shoots against the dusky pole,
Pacing toward the other goal
Of his chamber in the East.”

MILTON–Comus.

 

Apollo had another son, named Phaeton, who one day persuaded his father to allow him to drive the sun chariot. All went well for a time, and then Phaeton, being a reckless boy, began to drive too fast. He soon lost control of the horses, which plunged madly along and bore the chariot far from its track. It went so close to the earth that the fields were scorched, the rivers were dried up, and even the people were turned black–and they are black to this day! The cries of the terrified people attracted the attention of Jupiter, the king of the gods, who became enraged when he caught sight of the daring boy in the chariot of the sun. Taking up one of his thunderbolts, he hurled it at Phaeton, who, scorched by its fire, fell headlong to the earth.

 

Another sad story told of Apollo is that of his friendship with a youth named Hyacinthus, to talk with whom Apollo used often to come down to the earth. Zephyrus, the God of the South Wind, was very fond of Hyacinthus too, and one day as Apollo and Hyacinthus were playing a game of quoits, Zephyrus came by. Filled with jealousy at the sight of Apollo and his friend, he blew Apollo’s quoit aside so that it struck Hyacinthus and killed him. Apollo was greatly distressed at his friend’s death, and in order that he might never be forgotten, changed the fallen blood-drops into clusters of flowers, which we still call Hyacinths.

“For so Apollo, with unweeting hand,
Whilom did slay his dearly loved mate,
Young Hyacinth born on Enrotas’ strand,
Young Hyacinth the pride of Spartanland,
But then transformed him to a purple flower.”

MILTON.

 

Another flower which should always remind us of Apollo is the sunflower. A story says that there once lived a girl named Clytie, and that each day, with eyes full of love for the fair sun god, she watched him journey across the sky: but Apollo, knowing nothing of her love, took no heed of her as he passed. Clytie watched for him day after day on a river bank, and her heart sank as each evening she saw his chariot dip down into the West. She would not leave the river bank, but stayed all through the cold night, anxiously waiting for the first flash of the sun’s rays from the glowing East. At last the gods took pity on her, and changed her into a sunflower. Her green dress became green leaves, and her golden hair became yellow petals. Now was she happy indeed, for she knew that she could always see Apollo, and you will find that to this day the sunflower turns its head towards the sun as it moves across the sky.

 

Aurora, the Goddess of the Dawn, whom we have mentioned as opening the gates of the East for the sun god Apollo, married a mortal, Tithonus, a prince of Troy. In order that their happiness might know no end, Aurora begged Jupiter to grant Tithonus immortality. The wish was granted, but in her anxiety that Tithonus should never be taken from her by death, Aurora forgot to ask also for the gift of eternal youth. As the years went on Tithonus grew old and weak and became only a burden to her. At length, tired of his shrill voice and constant complaints, she turned him into a grasshopper, whose shrill complaining note is known to all.

 

The name for this month among the Angles and Saxons was Wulfmonath (Wolf month), since it was the time of year when the wolves were unable to find food, and their hunger made them bold enough to come into the villages.

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Monday, January 8

 

Monday is the sacred day of the moon, personified as the goddesses Selene, Luna, and Mani. The moon is ruler of flow, affecting the changeable and impressionable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, then the powers of the moon are at their most potent.

Deity: Mani

Zodiac Sign: Cancer

Planet: Moon

Tree: Willow

Herb: Chickweed

Stone: Agate

Animal: Crab

Element: Water

Color: Green

Rune: Lagu (L)

 

The Celtic Tree Month of Beth (Birch) (December 24 – January 20)

Runic Half Month of Eoh (Yew tree) (December 28 – January 12)

Goddess of the Month of Hestia (December 26th – January 22nd)

 

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick

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On Monday, January 8th, We Celebrate The Queen of the Witches, Hecate

Hecate

Believed to have originated outside of Greece—possibly Egypt or southwest Asia—before being assimilated into the Greek culture, Hecate was initially a mother goddess, associated with childbirth and the female reproductive process.
Her name has been given several possible meanings. “Hecate” is said to be a feminine form of “Hekatos,” which was a rarely used name for Apollo. It is also said to mean “most shining one,” which would correlate with portrayals of her wearing a starry headdress and holding a torch.
However, she later became associated with witchcraft, sorcery, ghosts, and the spirit world. Some argue that this was due to the advent of male-dominated societies becoming the norm, with a fear of women’s power. We will probably never know, but we do have an additional meaning for Hecate’s name, which is “she who works her will.” As such, she is a beloved patron goddess of many Wiccans and other magic-practicing Pagans.
In Greek mythology, Hecate tends to be seen as a powerful outsider. She is adopted by the Olympians, but never lives among them. And yet, in the earlier myths, Zeus grants her dominion over the Earth, the seas, and even the heavens, and she appears to be his equal.
Later myths show her as Zeus’ daughter and associate her with the Underworld. In one story, she is sent there to rescue Persephone who has been captured by Hades. Hades is reluctant to give Persephone up, so an arrangement is made to let her spend half of the year with the living and the other half in the Underworld with the dead. Hecate becomes Persephone’s chaperone as she moves between the worlds. As time went on, Hecate became increasingly depicted as a frightening hag, associated with the waning Moon and restless spirits, ultimately becoming known as the Goddess of the Dead.
Crossroads were traditionally associated with Hecate, most likely because of the crossroads that the newly dead would encounter in the Underworld. She could manifest as a black dog, considered a guardian symbol of both houses of the living and of the entrance to the realm of Hades.
She is often portrayed holding a snake—another symbol of the dead—and wearing a belt with the keys to the spirit world. She may be accompanied by a three-headed dog, or have the “triple head” of a dog, snake, and lion. Compared to the earlier representations of her with the torch and headdress of stars, it’s clear that her darker aspects became more prominent as time went on!
Wiccans revere Hecate’s title of “Queen of the Witches,” and many see her as an example of a triple goddess, even though she doesn’t quite fit the description in the classic sense. She is mostly a crone goddess, due to her associations with magic and death, and is called upon for help with transformational magic during the “dark” time of the year, beginning at Samhain. Some traditions worship Hecate and the Celtic goddess Brighid as alternating deities of darkneand light, with Hecate ruling over the waning half of the year, and Brighid ruling the waxing half—something like a feminine version of the Oak King and Holly King.
To honor Hecate, leave her offerings of raw eggs, cheese, or garlic at a crossroads, or decorate your altar with images of snakes, black dogs, owls or ravens.

Source

Wicca Magical Deities: A Guide to the Wiccan God and Goddess, and Choosing a Deity to Work Magic With
Lisa Chamberlain

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The Magick of Monday

Spellwork intentions:
Psychic work
Intuition
Dreams
Spirit Work
Female Fertility
Reconciliation
Receptivity
Love
Purity
Healing

Planet: The Moon

Color: Silver

Crystal: Pearl, Opal, Moonstone

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Magical Days Of the Week – Monday

 

Monday is the day of the moon itself, and it’s a day that’s connected to lunar colors like silver, white, or even a pale blue. Metals and gemstones like silver, pearl, opal and moonstone all come into play today.

 

There are plenty of deities associated with the moon – Thoth and Diana for instance – and herbal correspondences include many members of the mint family. Utilize wintergreen or peppermint, as well as catnip, comfrey, sage and chamomile in your workings.

 

When it comes to Monday magic, because of that lunar connection, it’s a good time to focus on workings related to childbearing and family life, purity and virginity, healing, wisdom, and intuition. Do a little bit of self exploration and work on developing your intuition – learn to trust your gut. Celebrate birth and life, and make some magic to fix what is broken.

 

Author

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Originally published on & owned by ThoughtCo.com

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Monday–The Day of the Moon

 

The moon, like the sun, was an object of wonder in the days of old, and was worshiped almost everywhere in some form or other, but it does not play quite so important a part in story as the sun. Since the moon is paler than the sun and its light soft and gentle, it was often regarded as being a chariot driven by a woman, but the course of the moon-goddess across the sky was similar to that of the sun-god.

 

Diana, the moon-goddess of the Greeks and Romans, known also as Cynthia, Phoebe, and Arterms, was the twin-sister of Apollo, and drove a golden chariot drawn by milk-white horses. Diana and Apollo were children of Jupiter, and were born in the Island of Delos, where a temple to Apollo was afterwards built. Another of the Seven Wonders of the World was the temple to Diana at Ephesus, on the west coast of Asia Minor. The worship of Diana at Ephesus is mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles: “And when the town clerk had quieted the multitude, he saith, ‘Ye men of Ephesus, what man is there who knoweth not how that the city of the Ephesians is temple-keeper of the great Diana and of the image which fell down from Jupiter?'” The temple was destroyed in the year A.D. 263, but remains of it may still be seen.

 

Diana was also the Goddess of Hunting; she was a skilled archer, and spent the day in huuting, as we have seen in the story of Orion.

 

The most famous story of Diana is that of her love for Endymion, a young shepherd–a story which has been told by the poets many times. One evening as the moon-goddess was driving silently across the sky, she saw sleeping on a hillside a handsome youth, his resting flock scattered over the gentle slope. Attracted by his beauty, Diana stepped from her chariot and gazed long at his face; then softly stooping, she kissed him lightly on the lips. Endymion, half wakened by her touch, caught a fleeting vision of the fair goddess as she hastened to her chariot. Filled with wonder at the sight, he rose quickly and rubbed his eyes, but all he saw was the bright moon floating across the dark sky, and he thought that he had been dreaming. The next night the goddess came to him again, and again he saw her with his half closed eyes. Each night when the bright rays of the moon fell on his upturned face he dreamed this wonderful dream, but he was always sleeping when the goddess came, and nevr saw her in her full and dazzling beauty. The days now seemed long and dreary to Endymion, and he waited anxiously for the night that he might see again the glorious vision.

 

Diana was filled with dread at the thought that the beautiful youth would lose his beauty as the years went by, and at last she cast a spell over him while he slept, so that he should never wake again, and carried him away to a cave in a mountain-side known only to herself. There the loving Diana paused each night in her journey across the sky, and gazed on the face of the fair Endymion.

 

Diana, when hunting in the forest, was attended by a band of wood-nymphs who were her faithful followers. One of these nymphs, Arethusa, was one day cooling herself after the chase on the banks of the River Alpheus, when suddenly the God of the River appeared. The startled nymph ran quickly into the woods, but the god Alpheus pursued her, telling her that he loved her and that she need fear no harm. Arethusa was too frightened to listen to the god, and ran on, till at last, worn out, she prayed to Diana for help. The moon-goddess was ever ready to help her faithful nymphs, and in answer to the prayer transformed the girl into a fountain, which she hid in a thick mist. Alpheus, suddenly losing sight of the nymph, wandered sorrowfully about, calling out her name in his distress. Arethusa now thought that she was safe, but the wind-god, Zephyrus, blew aside the mist, and Alpheus saw a fountain where there had not been one before, and guessed what had happened. He quickly changed himself into a river and rushed towards the fountain, but Arethusa sprang from the rocks and hastened away over the stones and grass. Diana now saw her fresh danger, and made an opening in the ground, through which Arethusa slipped, to find herself in the kingdom of Pluto, the God of the Underworld. Here she wandered until she found another opening, by which she escaped once again into the sunshine on the plain of Sicily. Alpheus, however, at last made his way across the sea to Sicily, where he found Arethusa and won her love. The Greeks believed that flowers cast into the River Alpheus in Greece were carried by the river as gifts to his lover, and appeared later in the fountain of Arethusa in Sicily!

 

Among the Egyptians the moon was regarded as a god, who was named Thoth (The Measurer). He was also the God of Wisdom, Invention, Writing, and Magic. He was one of the earliest of the Egyptian gods, having come into being at the same time as Ra, the sun-god, and it was he who was said to have created the world. The Romans compared him with Mercury because, like Mercury, he invented writing. As the God of the Moon, he was represented as wearing a crescent moon on his head, and holding in his hand a stylus, a pointed instrument used by the Egyptians for writing on their wax tablets.

 

The Babylonian moon-god was Sin, the Lord of Wisdom. He was the father of the sun-god, and was one of the greatest of the gods, owing to the fact that the Babylonians regulated their calendar by the moon.

 

The Angles and Saxons believed that the moon was driven across the sky by Mani, the son of a giant, in a golden chariot drawn by a horse named the All Swift. As in the case of the sun, our ancestors had no distinct goddess of the moon; but we shall read of Mani again in a later chapter.

 

Hymn to Diana

Queen and huntress, chaste and fair,
Now the sun is laid to sleep,
Seated in thy silver chair,
State in wonted manner keep:
Hesperus entreats thy light,
Goddess excellently bright.
Earth, let not thy envious shade
Dare itself to interpose;
Cynthia’s shining orb was made
Heaven to clear when day did close;
Bless us then with wished sight,
Goddess excellently bright.
Lay thy bow of pearl apart,
And thy crystal shining quiver;
Give unto the flying hart
Space to breathe, how short soever,
Thou that mak’st a day of night,
Goddess excellently bright.

BEN JONSON–Cynthia’s Revels.

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The Witches Guide to Mondays

 

In the word Monday, we can see part of the word Moon. In the romance languages such as Italian or Spanish, this day of the week is called Lunes and clearly relates to the word lunar. On Mondays, a variety of magick may be worked. Because Monday centers on the energies of the Moon, things like dreams, feminine energy, health, success in spiritual pursuits, domestic matters, and things of family origin are especially important this day.

 

Mondays are best for love magick and anything concerning home or family, thus old saying, Mondays child is fair of face, which seems clearly to relate to the themes of love and health.

 

Angels of Monday are Gabriel, Arcan, Missabu, and Abuzaha. Arcan is known as the king of the angels of air and the “ruler” of Monday. Abuzaha (Abuzohar) serves Monday, and is very responsive to invocations and ritual magick. Missabu is a ministering angel of Arcan.

 

Check whether the moon is waning or waxing to determine what your spell will be. During waning moons, do spells to rid yourself of obstacles or for wisdom and protection. During waxing moons do magic for increase of any kind or to draw something into your life.

 

On Mondays, the best hour to work is moonrise. Get this information from your local newspaper, astrological calendar, or almanac.
Source

Gypsy Magic

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Monday Is A Day of Witchery, Magick and Enchantment

 

Think for a moment on all of the witchery, magick and enchantments that you have discovered. Don’t be afraid to adjust spells to suit your own specific needs. Any gentle, illusory, and dreamy charms and spells can be enhanced when you work on the day of the week that is dedicated to the moon. Mondays are a fantastic day to boost your psychic abilities and to tune in to your intuition and empathy. It also gives you the opportunity to work with a different lunar phase each and every Monday, which means in one month you could work four different types of moon magicks on Mondays. How’s that for adding to your repertoire? You are going to have mad skills in no time at all.

 

So light up those lunar scented candles and add a little mystique to your outfit by wearing an enchanting lunar color. Wear your sparkling silver jewelry and maybe add a pair of dangling silver earrings or a pendant shaped like a crescent moon. Create lunar potions and philters; make a dream catcher and give it as a gift to someone you love. Burn some sandalwood or jasmine-scented incense today to inspire the glamour and magick of the moon. Slice up a favorite variety of fruit that is in season for a snack or share it with your love and enjoy his or her lunar and romantic qualities. Brew up a cup of chamomile tea, enchant it with a little moon magick, and relax and get a good night’s sleep.

 

Most importantly, get outside tonight and watch the moon for a while. What phase is she in? What color was the moon as she rose? Why not start a journal and write down at what location the moon rises and sets for a few seasons? This is a great way to teach you to tune in and to become more aware of the moon and the influence that she pulls into our lives. Try calling on Selene for her magickal assistance, and call Thoth for wisdom and strength. Get to know the Norse Mani and the Latvian Meness. These gods of the moon have plenty to teach, and if you allow their influence to cycle through your life, you’ll receive many blessings. Be imaginative, and create your own personal lunar magick and witchery. Go on….the moonlight becomes you.

 

Source
Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

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The Witches Almanac for Monday, January 8th

Midwives’ Day (Bulgarian)

Waning Moon

 
Fourth Quarter 5: 25 pm

 
Moon Sign: Libra

 
Incense: Hyssop

 
Color: Lavender

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Moon in Libra

Creating order is the focus, not necessarily through tidying or organizing as was the case while the Moon was in Virgo, but rather through pleasing interactions with others and aesthetics in our environment. We tend to solve problems through diplomacy, and we are more able to put aside our own emotions in order to achieve the peace we crave. The tendency now is to avoid direct confrontations. Decisions do not come easily. Seeing both sides to any given situation is the main reason for hesitation. Fear of losing others’ approval is another.

 

The Moon in Libra generally favors the following activities: Relationship and partnership issues, activities involving teamwork and cooperation, activities that involve self-examination, activities related to beauty.

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The Witches Correspondences for Monday, January 8th

 

Day: Monday ( Moon-day)

Planet: Moon

Colors: Silver and White and Grey

Crystals: Moonstone, Pearl, Aquamarine, Silver, Selenite

Aroma: Jasmine, Lemon, Sandalwood, Moon Oil, African violet, Honeysuckle, Myrtle, Willow, and Wormwood

Herb: Moonwart

The sacred day of the Moon, personified by such goddesses as Selene, Luna, Diana, and Artemis. The Moon is ruler of flow affecting the changeable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, its powers are at their most potent.

Magical aspects: peace, sleep, healing, compassion, friendships, psychic awareness, purification, and fertility Monday is ruled by the moon – an ancient symbol of mystery and peace. Monday is a special day for mothers as the cycle of the moon has long been associated with the female menstrual cycle. Those wishing to conceive a baby would be wise to try on a Monday as the magic of motherhood is strong and pregnancy is in the air.

This is the proper day of the week to perform spells and rituals involving agriculture, animals, female fertility, messages, reconciliation’s, theft, voyages, dreams, emotions, clairvoyance, home, family, medicine, cooking, personality, merchandising, psychic work, Faerie magic, and Goddess rituals

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Monday Is Ruled By the Moon

 

This day of the week is dedicated to the moon and all of her magic and mystery. Mondays are for women’s mysteries, illusion, prophetic dreaming, emotions, travel, and fertility.

Some suggestions for Monday enchantments would include:

*Getting outside and looking for the moon in the heavens. Sit under her light and absorb a little glamour. Call on the moon goddess Selene for practical help in magical issues.

*Invoking the god Thoth for wisdom and insight

*Empowering your silver jewelry under the light of the moon. Wear moonstone or pearl jewelry today to add a lunar and magical shimmer to your outfit.

*Be mysterious and subtle and wear moon-associated colors such as white, silver, and blue.

*Working spells for safe travel with a simple moonstone

*Gathering bluebells, jasmine, gardenias, or white roses to create a little garden witchery with the flowers that are associated with the moon

*Setting up a lunar Tarot spell today to increase your psychic powers

*Eating a lunar fruit such as a melon to be healthy, serene, and at peace

*Brewing up a cup of chamomile or mint tea and enchanting it for sweet dreams and restful sleep

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The Energy of the Moon

 

Planet: Moon

Day: Monday

Color: Silver, white, light blue, purple

Metal: Silver

Associations: Childbearing and family life, purity and virginity, healing, wisdom, intuition

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MAGICKAL APPLICATIONS FOR MONDAY

 

Monday is named after the moon. The Latin term for Monday is Dies Lunae (“moon’s day”); in the Old English language, this day was Monandaeg; in Greek, it was Hermera Selenes. All of these different names and languages translate to the same thing: the “day of the moon.”

 

Working with the different phases of the moon is an important skill that takes a bit of time for Witches to learn. So why not cut to the chase and experiment with the day of the week that is dedicated to the moon in all of its magickal energies and aspects?

 

Magickally, Monday encourages the lunar energies of inspiration, illusion, prophetic dreams, emotions, psychic abilities, travel, women’s mysteries, and fertility.

Source
Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

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The Witches Magick for Monday, January 8th – Household Protectors Spell

 

Everyone has a protector, individual and family collective. If you think you don’t get help from yours, perhaps you need to give them a little more attention and praise. Use statues, bowls of stones, or other focal objects as a habitation for the family protectors.
This ritual is best during the waxing moon. Gather the following objects on your altar. Choose incense that reminds you of herbs, forests, and green growing things. Put a green candle in a holder and lay your wand beside it.
Decorate the immediate area around your symbol with pine cones, small statues of deer or other forest animals, ivy, holly, or something similar. Clean the guardian symbol so it hasn’t any dust or dirt on it. If the symbol is small enough set it on the altar or next to it.
Light the incense and candle. Stand before your altar and say:

Guardian spirits, I invite you to join me here at this altar.
You are my friends, ,and I wish to thank you.

Take the incense and circle the guardian symbol three times, moving clockwise.
I thank you for the atmosphere you help to keep clean and pleasant in this home.
Move the candle clockwise around the symbol three times.
I thank you for the light you send to purify and dispel the darkness.
With the wand in your power hand, encircle the symbol three times clockwise.
I ask for your continued help and protection for me, my family, my pets, and my property. I ask that you drive away trouble-makers, thieves, and other, physical and non-physical, who are bent on evil disruptive purposes. I thank you for your friendship and love.
Stand with your arms raised and say:

Lovely Goddess, Lord of the Greenwood, I present to you the guardian of this house, the special spirit I have invited into my home. I honor this guardian in this symbol of its being. Bless this guardian. And to your blessings, I add my thanks for its protection and friendship.

If you have more than one guardian, change all the its to their and so on. Spend a few moments lovingly caressing the symbol, mentally expressing that the guardian is important to you. If you have provided food and drink, invite your guardian friends to party with you. Talk with them, being sensitive to feathery caresses and mental whispers. When you are finished, thank them for their presence at your ritual.

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Celebrating Legends,Folklore & Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year for January 8th

Justitia’s Day (Themis)

In classical Paganism, the spirit of Justice was feminine. It was believed that the quality of justice depended upon the femi- nine principle of Nature, which had a closer kinship with natura justum (that which is by Nature) than the masculine sex had.

 
It was Themis, the daughter of Uranus and Gaea and advisor to Zeus, who personified law and order. She protected the innocent, punished the guilty, and was considered the Goddess of law, peace, justice and righteousness. Themis carried a set of scales and was present at all feasts, social gatherings, and oath-swearing ceremonies

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Magickal Activities for January 8th, The Day of Justitia

Prayer for Justice

Gracious Goddess, I beseech thy advocacy on my behalf.

Give to those who judge the spirit of wisdom and

understanding that they may discern the truth.

Allow them to render justice moderated with

compassion and mercy.

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The Current Moon Phase for Monday, January 8th

Last Quarter
Illumination: 55%

The Moon today is in a Third Quarter phase. Sometimes called a Last Quarter Moon, this phase occurs roughly 3 weeks after the New Moon when the earth is three quarter of the way through it’s orbit around the earth. If you live in the northern hemisphere the Moons left side will be illuminated and the right side dark. For thoughts of you in the southern hemisphere it will be the opposite with the right side illuminated. On the day of the Third Quarter phase the Moon will rise around midnight on the eastern horizon and set in the west around noon the next day. In the days following the Third Quarter Phase the Moon’s illumination will decrees each day until the New Moon.

 

PHASE DETAILS FOR – MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2018
Phase: Last Quarter
Illumination: 55%
Moon Age: 21.72 days
Moon Angle: 0.52
Moon Distance: 385,505.10 km
Sun Angle: 0.54
Sun Distance: 147,108,991.96 km
Source
MoonGiant.com

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