Deities Associated with Tuesday – The Morrighan, Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignty

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The Morrighan, Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignty

In Celtic mythology, the Morrighan is known as a goddess of battle and war. However, there’s a bit more to her than this. Also referred to as Morrígu, Morríghan, or Mor-Ríoghain, she is called the “washer at the ford,” because if a warrior saw her washing his armor in the stream, it meant he was to die that day. She is the goddess who determines whether or not you walk off the field of battle, or are carried off upon your shield.

In later Irish folklore, this role would be delegated to the bain sidhe, who foresaw the death of members of a specific family or clan.

The Morrighan often appears in the form of a crow or raven, or is seen accompanied by a group of them. In the stories of the Ulster cycle, she is shown as a cow and a wolf as well. The connection with these two animals suggest that in some areas, she may have been connected to fertility and land.

In some legends, the Morrighan is considered a triune, or triple goddess, but there are a lot of inconsistencies to this. She often appears as a sister to the Badb and Macha.

In some Neopagan traditions, she is portrayed in her role as destroyer, representing the Crone aspect of the Maiden/Mother/Crone cycle, but this seems to be incorrect when one looks at her original Irish history. Some scholars point out that war specifically is not a primary aspect of the Morrighan, and that her connection to cattle presents her as a goddess of sovereignty. The theory is that she can be seen as a deity who guides or protects a king.

In modern literature, there has been some linking of the Morrighan to the character of Morgan Le Fay in the Arthurian legend. It appears, though, that this is more fanciful thinking than anything else. Although Morgan le Fay appears in the Vita Merlini in the twelfth century, a narrative of the life of Merlin by Geoffrey of Monmouth, it’s unlikely that there’s a connection to the Morrighan. Scholars point out that the name “Morgan” is Welsh, and derived from root words connected to the sea. “Morrighan” is Irish, and is rooted in words that are associated with “terror” or “greatness.” In other words, the names sound similar, but the relationship ends there.

Author
Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

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Deity of the Day – The Morrighan

Deity of the Day – the morrighan

 

The Morrighan – Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignity

By Patti Wigington, About.com 

In Celtic mythology, the Morrighan is known as a goddess of battle and war. However, there’s a bit more to her than this. Also referred to as Morrígu, Morríghan, or Mor-Ríoghain, she is called the “washer at the ford,” because if a warrior saw her washing his armor in the stream, it meant he was to die that day. She is the goddess who determines whether or not you walk off the field of battle, or are carried off upon your shield. In later Irish folklore, this role would be delegated to the bain sidhe, who foresaw the death of members of a specific family or clan.

The Morrighan often appears in the form of a crow or raven, or is seen accompanied by a group of them. In the stories of the Ulster cycle, she is shown as a cow and a wolf as well. The connection with these two animals suggest that in some areas, she may have been connected to fertility and land.

In some legends, the Morrighan is considered a triune, or triple goddess, but there are a lot of inconsistencies to this. She often appears as a sister to the Badb and Macha. In some Neopagan traditions, she is portrayed in her role as destroyer, representing the Crone Aspect of the Maiden/Mother/Crone cycle, but this seems to be incorrect when one looks at her original Irish history. Some scholars point out that war specifically is not a primary aspect of the Morrighan, and that her connection to cattle presents her as a goddess of sovereignty. The theory is that she can be seen as a deity who guides or protects a king.

In modern literature, there has been some linking of the Morrighan to the character of Morgan Le Fay in the Arthurian legend. It appears, though, that this is more fanciful thinking than anything else. Although Morgan le Fay appears in the Vita Merlini in the twelfth century, a narrative of the life of Merlin by Geoffrey of Monmouth, it’s unlikely that there’s a connection to the Morrighan. Scholars point out that the name “Morgan” is Welsh, and derived from root words connected to the sea. “Morrighan” is Irish, and is rooted in words that are associated with “terror” or “greatness.” In other words, the names sound similar, but the relationship ends there.

There’s an excellent page with plenty of scholarly information on the Morrighan from Reverend Gwynarion Elessacar at http://www.elessacar.com/the_morrighan.php.

The Morrighan – Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignity

The Morrighan – Celtic Goddess of War and Sovereignity

By , About.com

In Celtic mythology, the Morrighan is known as a goddess of battle and war. However, there’s a bit more to her than this. Also referred to as Morrígu, Morríghan, or Mor-Ríoghain, she is called the “washer at the ford,” because if a warrior saw her washing his armor in the stream, it meant he was to die that day. She is the goddess who determines whether or not you walk off the field of battle, or are carried off upon your shield. In later Irish folklore, this role would be delegated to the bain sidhe, who foresaw the death of members of a specific family or clan.

The Morrighan often appears in the form of a crow or raven, or is seen accompanied by a group of them. In the stories of the Ulster cycle, she is shown as a cow and a wolf as well. The connection with these two animals suggest that in some areas, she may have been connected to fertility and land.

In some legends, the Morrighan is considered a triune, or triple goddess, but there are a lot of inconsistencies to this. She often appears as a sister to the Badb and Macha. In some Neopagan traditions, she is portrayed in her role as destroyer, representing the Crone aspect of the Maiden/Mother/Crone cycle, but this seems to be incorrect when one looks at her original Irish history. Some scholars point out that war specifically is not a primary aspect of the Morrighan, and that her connection to cattle presents her as a goddess of sovereignty. The theory is that she can be seen as a deity who guides or protects a king.

In modern literature, there has been some linking of the Morrighan to the character of Morgan Le Fay in the Arthurian legend. It appears, though, that this is more fanciful thinking than anything else. Although Morgan le Fay appears in the Vita Merlini in the twelfth century, a narrative of the life of Merlin by Geoffrey of Monmouth, it’s unlikely that there’s a connection to the Morrighan. Scholars point out that the name “Morgan” is Welsh, and derived from root words connected to the sea. “Morrighan” is Irish, and is rooted in words that are associated with “terror” or “greatness.” In other words, the names sound similar, but the relationship ends ther

The Very Inspiring Blogger Award!!!!

Morrighan at The Enchanted Solitaire has nominated me for The Very Inspiring Blogger Award!!! Boy, what a wonderful surprise! This is fantastic, Morrighan. Thank you so much. I have never asked for any recognition so I am very humbled by this Award. I deeply appreciate you nominating me for this Award, dear sister. Thank you!

There are some rules to this Award but first I would like to plug a wonderful site,  The Enchanted Solitaire. I am not doing this because Morrighan nominated me for the Award. I doing it because Morrighan’s site is a very beautiful and inspiring site. It is a site that is a must see. She has very informative articles and beautiful graphics that you will enjoy. The Enchanted Solitaire would be well worth you time to visit.

Morrighan, forgive me, I must copy the rules of the Award for your site. I hope you don’t mind, lol! The rules are to thank the person and link back to the blogger that has nominated you. Then post the award logo to your blog ,write a post on the nomination and nominate 15 other very inspiring bloggers. notify them and then tell 7 things about yourself.

Hmm, something about me. Are you ready for this, lol!

1.  Most people wonder about my name, Lady of the Abyss (the Abyss, part). I know most people assume that the Abyss is associated with something dark. But for me, it’s not. I got the name during a time in my life were I was unsure of the Path I was suppose to take. So to me, the Abyss means the unknown.

2. I now know my Path but I am too well associated with the name to change it. More than likely if I was so associated with the name, I probably wouldn’t change it anyway, lol!

3. I am a Hereditary Witch as well as a Solitary.

4. I love practicing Witchcraft. Believe it or not, I find time almost every day to do so.

5. I don’t like mornings. I am a night person. Three o’clock in the morning I am up.

6. I have an unusual ability to communicate with wild animals. I think some might call it “charming” the animal. I just call it “unusual,” lol!

7. I consider myself very fortunate to have three familiars. They chose me, I didn’t chose them. But if I had to chose it would have been the three I have. They are very protective and can sense anything around that isn’t suppose to be.

Now I am to nominate 15 blogs. Please note, they are in no particular order. They are all fantastic blogs. So please take a moment to visit them:

1.  LoreBook

2.  Hedge Wife

3.  Lady Imbrium’s Holocron

4.  The London Flower Lover

5.  Ravencrow Designs

6.  Chiron! the business doctor.

7.  Magickal Moonies Sanctuary

8.  eevee lily  )0(  hippy witch

9.  Garden Witches Kitchen

10. James Ricklef’s Tarot Blog

11. Plantasmagorical

12. Balladeer’s Blog

13. The Bent Needle

14. Journeying to the Goddess

15. The Tale of My Heart

 

Thank you again Morrighan for the Award. I have already done this once and I am a nervous wreck that this post won’t go thru.So cross your fingers and here goes nothing……..