August Full Moon – Also Known as the Corn Moon

In late August, we celebrate the beginning of the Corn Moon. This moon phase is also known as the Barley Moon, and carries on the associations of grain and rebirth that we saw a couple of weeks earlier, at Lammastide. August was originally known as Sextilis by the ancient Romans, but was later renamed for Augustus (Octavian) Caesar.

This is a season of the beginning harvest. It’s when corn and wheat are flourishing in the fields, and will soon be threshed. If you have a garden, it’s probably blooming with tomatoes, onions, and herbs just waiting to be picked. Focus on this harvest aspect of August’s full moon, and consider what things you have in your life, right now, that can be gathered, collected, and stored for later.

Correspondences…

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Colors associated with the corn moon include yellow, red, and orange—after all, these are the tones you see in the cobs of a freshly plucked ear of corn. For gemstones, look to use tigers eye, carnelian, garnet, or red agate in your magical workings.

Trees connected to the corn moon include cedar and hazel. Carry a bit of cedar in your pocket when you’re facing new challenges, to help boost your courage, and utilize hazel for magical workings related to good fortune. You can keep a hazelnut in your pocket to draw luck your way, or hang a bough of hazel branches above your door.

Some of the many deities of the corn moon season are Vulcan, whose festival, the Vulcanalia, falls each year on August 23. The Greek goddess Nemesis also had a festival held on this day. Mars was known as a god of war, but in some incarnations, is associated with the bounty of the grain harvest; offerings were made in his honor for a plentiful yield. Egyptian deities like Hathor and Thoth had a strong connection to this time of year, because they are so closely linked to the rich, fertile soil of the land surrounding the Nile delta.

For magical herbal correspondences this month, look at using rosemary, rue, basil, and chamomile in your workings. All of these should be flourishing in your garden right now, and you can harvest and dry them for future use.

Corn Moon Magic

Colors associated with the corn moon include yellow, red, and orange—after all, these are the tones you see in the cobs of a freshly plucked ear of corn. For gemstones, look to use tigers eye, carnelian, garnet, or red agate in your magical workings.

Trees connected to the corn moon include cedar and hazel. Carry a bit of cedar in your pocket when you’re facing new challenges, to help boost your courage, and utilize hazel for magical workings related to good fortune. You can keep a hazelnut in your pocket to draw luck your way, or hang a bough of hazel branches above your door.

Some of the many deities of the corn moon season are Vulcan, whose festival, the Vulcanalia, falls each year on August 23. The Greek goddess Nemesis also had a festival held on this day. Mars was known as a god of war, but in some incarnations, is associated with the bounty of the grain harvest; offerings were made in his honor for a plentiful yield. Egyptian deities like Hathor and Thoth had a strong connection to this time of year, because they are so closely linked to the rich, fertile soil of the land surrounding the Nile delta.

For magical herbal correspondences this month, look at using rosemary, rue, basil, and chamomile in your workings. All of these should be flourishing in your garden right now, and you can harvest and dry them for future use.

Corn Moon Magic