Calendar of the Sun for May 5th

Calendar of the Sun
5 Thrimilchimonath

Oshun’s Day

Colors: Yellow and gold
Element: Water
Altar: Upon a cloth of yellow and gold set six yellow candles, a pot of honey, many ornaments of gold and brass, peacock and vulture feathers, golden coins, a glass of river water, a bottle of honey brandy, peaches, and pumpkin seeds.
Offerings: Pumpkin seeds, yellow or orange fruit, honey, and brandy.
Daily Meal: Yellow food, fruit, sweet things, honey.

Opening Chant for Oshun:
Love is a river,
Flowing from my heart,
Flowing from my heart.

Oshun Invocation

Daughter of the River,
Goddess of Love,
Golden one whose taste is honey
Whose touch is the flow of water
Whose dance is enchanting
Who is the glint of gold and the sound of laughter
And who is much more than these things,
Bless us with your ability to love
And see the divine within every one of us.
Lady of the peacock,
Let us appreciate beauty when we find it,
In any form that it arrives.
Lady of the vulture,
Let us remember that even those things
Which are ugly and rotting
Need merely to be transformed
And that they, too, are part of the cycle of life.
Let us be a vehicle for that transformation.
You love is like the river
That flows along forever,
Mixing sweet waters with the salt of the sea,
And as we live our bittersweet lives,
We will remember and revere your shining dance.

(All take drums in a circle, and let there be drumming and dancing in honor of Oshun.)
Source:

Pagan Hour of Hours

The Love Goddess for You

by Cait Johnson

Back before Ann Landers or couples counselors, before the psychic hotline and the daily love horoscope, people prayed to their local love goddess for help with relationship matters. After all, everyone deserves to have a goddess they can talk to about love issues: it helps to know that you have a powerful deity in your corner, cheering you on, offering gentle advice in the form of your own intuition, a place to go where you can find some peace and serenity around the crazy-making stuff of love.

We all know about the Ancient Greek goddess Aphrodite (whose name gave us the word “aphrodisiac,” among other things) and Venus, her Roman counterpart, but what if you don’t identify with a Greek or Italian goddess? Which love goddess can you go to for help, healing, and advice?
Well, here are some love goddesses from Ireland, Mexico, South America, India, Africa, the Middle East, and more. We also include a listing of offerings that are traditional to give each one, here:

Africa: Oshun(amber, seashells, water)

Borneo: Fire Woman(candles)

China: Zhinu(stars, silver things)

Egypt: Isis(silver, amethyst, myrrh)

France: Isolt(anything white)

Germany: Minne(dried linden flowers, beer)

Haiti: Erzulie(peppercorns, anything blue)

India: Kamala(lotus, yellow things)

Ireland: Edain(crystals)

Japan: Kamuhata Hime(braided yarn)

Korea: Bai Mundan(white flowers)

Lithuania: Laima(wreaths)

Mexico: Chaska(fire, flowers)

Middle East: Asherah (lilies), Anaitis (cinnamon, green branches), Ishtar(stars, moons, doves)

Native American: Bear Woman(stone carvings)

Persia: Anahita(water, green branches)

Romanian Gypsy: Amari De(luminescent cloth, matches)

Teutonic: Iduna (apples)

The Love Goddess for You

The Love Goddess for You

  • Cait Johnson

Back before Ann Landers or couples counselors, before the psychic hotline and the daily love horoscope, people prayed to their local love goddess for help with relationship matters. After all, everyone deserves to have a goddess they can talk to about love issues: it helps to know that you have a powerful deity in your corner, cheering you on, offering gentle advice in the form of your own intuition, a place to go where you can find some peace and serenity around the crazy-making stuff of love.

We all know about the Ancient Greek goddess Aphrodite (whose name gave us the word “aphrodisiac,” among other things) and Venus, her Roman counterpart, but what if you don’t identify with a Greek or Italian goddess? Which love goddess can you go to for help, healing, and advice?

Well, here are some love goddesses from Ireland, Mexico, South America, India, Africa, the Middle East, and more. We also include a listing of offerings that are traditional to give each one, here:

Africa: Oshun(amber, seashells, water)

Borneo: Fire Woman(candles)

China: Zhinu(stars, silver things)

Egypt: Isis(silver, amethyst, myrrh)

France: Isolt(anything white)

Germany: Minne(dried linden flowers, beer)

Haiti: Erzulie(peppercorns, anything blue)

India: Kamala(lotus, yellow things)

Ireland: Edain(crystals)

Japan: Kamuhata Hime(braided yarn)

Korea: Bai Mundan(white flowers)

Lithuania: Laima(wreaths)

Mexico: Chaska(fire, flowers)

Middle East: Asherah (lilies), Anaitis (cinnamon, green branches), Ishtar(stars, moons, doves)

Native American: Bear Woman(stone carvings)

Persia: Anahita(water, green branches)

Romanian Gypsy: Amari De(luminescent cloth, matches)

Teutonic: Iduna (apples)

Earth Correspondences

Earth Correspondences

 

 

ZODIAC

Capricorn: Beginning and structure

Taurus: Saving and fixed

Virgo: Changing (mutable) and review oriented

COLOR ASSOCIATION

Yellow or green, depending on the tradition you practice. Yellow for ceremonial Wicca and green for shamanic Wicca.

WICCAN TOOL

Cauldron or pentacle

ANGELS/GUARDIANS

Abundance: Barbelo

Agriculture: Rismuch

Alchemy: Och

Animals: Thegri, Mtniel, Hehiel, Hayyal

Commerce: Anauel

Creeping Things: Orifiel

Dust: Suphlatus

Earthquakes: Sui’el, Rashiel

Farming Sofiel

Fertility: Samandiriel, Yushamin

Food: Manna

Gaia: Michael, Jehoel, Metatron, Mammon

Gardens: Cathetel

Nourishment: Isda

Forests: Zuphlas

Fruition: Anahita

Mountains: Mehabiah

Plants: Sachluph

Trees: Maktiel, Zuphlas

Vegetables: Sealiah, Sofiel

Wild Birds: Trgiaob

DEITIES

African: Earth Mother, Divine Queen, Nimba, Oshun, Tenga

Egypt: (Female) Anatha, Bast, Isis, Mehueret, (Male) Min, Geb

Greek/Roman: (Female) Atlantia, Clonia, Flora, Hestia, (Male) Fauna, Pan

Norse: (Female) Frigga, Holda, Nanna, She-Wolf.

Celtic: (Female) Aine, Anu, Blodeuwedd, Cailleach Beara, Magog, Rosemerta

The Orishas

The Orishas

by Efun Moyiwa

 

The orishas are the emissaries of Olodumare or God almighty. They rule over the forces of nature and the endeavors of humanity. They recognize themselves and are recognized through the different numbers and colors that are their marks, and each has their own favorite foods and other things that they like to receive as offerings and gifts. In this way, we make our offerings in the manner they are accustomed to, in the way they have always received them, so that they will recognize our offerings and come to our aid.

The orishas are often best understood by observing the forces of nature they rule over. For instance, you can learn much about Oshún and her children by watching the rivers and streams she rules over and observing that though she always heads toward her sister Yemayá (the Sea) she does so on her own circuitous route. Also observehow the babbling brook and the flash flood reflect her changeable moods. As you observe the orishas at work in the world and in your own lives, you will gain a better understanding of them and their ways. Yes, they are complex, but no more so than any other living being such as you or I. We are also blessed from time to time in the religion with the opportunity to meet the orishas face to face during a bembé where one or more of their priests will be mounted.

Elegba

Elegba (also referred to as Eleggua or Elegguá) is the owner of the roads and doors in this world. He is the repository of ashé, the spiritual energy that makes up the universe. The colors red and black or white and black are his and codify his contradictory nature. In particular, Elegba stands at the crossroads of the human and the divine, as he is the childlike messenger between the two worlds. In this role, it is not surprising that he has a very close relationship with the orisha of divination, Orunmila. Nothing can be done in either world without his permission. Elegba is always propitiated and always called first before any other orisha as he opens the door between the worlds and opens our roads in life. He recognizes himself and is recognized by the numbers 3 and 21.

Ogún

Ogún is the god of iron, war and labor. He is the owner of all technology, and because this technology shares in his nature, it is almost always used first for war. As Elegba opens the roads, it is Ogún that clears the roads with his machete. He is recognized in the numbers 7 and the colors green and black.

Oshosi

Oshosi is the third member of the group known as the Guerreros or Warriors and is received along with Elegba, Ogún and Osun in order to protect Guerreros initiates and to open and clear their roads. Oshosi is the hunter and the scout of the orishas and assumes the role of translator for Obatalá, with whom he has a very close relationship. His colors are blue and yellow.

Obatalá

Obatalá is the kindly father of all the orishas and all humanity. He is also the owner of all heads and the mind. Though it was Olorun who created the universe, it is Obatalá who is the creator of the world and humanity. Obatalá is the source of all that is pure, wise, peaceful and compassionate. He has a warrior side, though, through which he enforces justice in the world. His color is white, which is often accented with red, purple and other colors to represent different possible paths. White is most appropriate for Obatalá as it contains all the colors of the rainbow yet is above them. Obatalá is also the only orisha that has both male and female paths.

Oyá

Oyá is the ruler of the winds, the whirlwind and the gates of the cemetery. Her number is nine, which recalls her title of Yansa, or “Mother of Nine,” in which she rules over the egun or dead. She is also known for the colors of maroon, flowery patterns and nine different colors. She is a fierce warrior who rides to war with Shangó (sharing lightning and fire with him) and was once the wife of Ogún.

Oshún

Oshún rules over the sweet waters of the world, the brooks, streams and rivers, embodying love, fertility. She also is the one we most often approach to aid us in money matters. She is the youngest of the female orishas but retains the title of Iyalode or great queen. She heals with her sweet waters and with honey, which she also owns. She is the femme fatale of the orishas and once saved the world by luring Ogún out of the forests using her feminine wiles. And, in her path or manifestation of Ibú Ikolé, she saved the world from drought by flying up to heaven (turning into a vulture in the process). Ikolé means Messenger of the House (of Olodumare). For this reason, all who are to be initiated as priests, no matter what orisha rules their head, must go to the river and give account of what they are about to do. She recognizes herself in the colors yellow and gold, and her number is five. Peacocks and vultures are hers, and we use them often to represent her.

Yemayá

Yemayá lives and rules over the seas and lakes. She also rules over maternity in our lives as she is the Mother of All. Her name, a shortened version of Yeyé Omo Eja, means “Mother Whose Children are the Fish” to reflect the fact that her children are uncountable. All life started in the sea; the amniotic fluid inside the mother’s womb is a form of sea where the embryo must transform and evolve through the form of a fish before becoming a human baby. In this way, Yemayá displays herself as truly the mother of all. She, the root of all the paths or manifestations, Olokun is the source of all riches, which she freely gives to her little sister Oshún. She dresses herself in seven skirts of blue and white, and like the seas and profound lakes she is deep and unknowable. In her path of Okutti, she is the queen of witches, carrying within her deep and dark secrets. Her number is seven for the seven seas; her colors are blue and white; and she is most often represented by the fish who are her children.

Shangó

Perhaps the most “popular” of the orishas, Shangó rules over lightning, thunder, fire, the drums and dance. He is a warrior orisha with quick wits and quick temper and is the epitome of virility. Shangó took the form of the fourth Alafin (supreme king) of Oyó on Earth for a time. He is married to Obba but has relations with Oyá and Oshún. He is an extremely hot-blooded and strong-willed orisha who loves all the pleasures of the world: dance, drumming, women, song and eating. He is “ocanani” with Elegba, meaning they are of one heart. When one sees the quickness with which lightning makes short work of a tree or sees a fire rage through an area, one has witnessed the temper of Shangó in action. Though he traded the Table of Ifá to Orunmila in exchange for the gift of dance, his children have an innate ability for divination. To acknowledge the greatness of this king, all in the religion raise up on the toes of our feet (or rise out our chairs if we are sitting) at the mention of his name. His colors are red and white, and he recognizes himself in the numbers four and six. He is most often represented by a double-headed ax.

Orunmila

Orunmila is the orisha of wisdom and divination. He was the only orisha allowed to witness the creation of the universe by Olorun and bears witness to our destinies in the making as well. This is the source of his title of Eleri Ipin or “Witness to Destiny in its Creation.” His priests, the babalawos or “Fathers of the Secrets,” must devote themselves entirely to the practice of divination and the accompanying arts. Through the Table of Ifá, his priests unfold the secrets of the universe and the secrets of the unfolding of our lives. His colors are green and yellow, which reflect Orunmila’s relationship with Osayín (the secrets of the plant world) and with Oshún, who is his apeteví, with whom he has an extremely close relationship. Orunmila is wisdom and Oshún is knowledge, for wisdom without knowledge is useless, and one who has knowledge without wisdom is merely a danger to themselves and others.

Spirit Summoning Spells

Summoning a person is usually straight-forward. Call them on the telephone, drop them a note. Faxes and e-mails are instantaneous. If you’re patient, you could show up on their doorstep and await their inevitable arrival home. But how do you summon a spirit?

Straightforward methods exist as well as more complex ones. There are a lot of ways. Ancient theurgists used to call spirits with spinning tops. Some spirits respond if their name is called while others only respond to elaborate spells and rituals. It’s possible to summon generic “benevolent” spirits or summon a specific one by name. It is usually wisest to know exactly whom you’re summoning.

Some traditions consider that it’s safest or necessary to contact a gatekeeper spirit who will then summon the actual spirit for you. Essentially you are summoning a spirit to summon spirits for you. Although whether you choose to do this depends largely upon the tradition you follow, it is a wise practice if you are in the habit of summoning “generic” spirits. Summoning spirits without being very familiar with their identity and personality is a little like living in a very busy metropolis, throwing your front door open and inviting just anyone to enter. Always remember that, as with any guest, it’s easier to invite them in than to ask them to leave.

Gate guardian spirits may be petitioned to only permit benevolent or kind spirits through and bar the gate to malicious spirits. These gate guardians include:

  • Elegba

  • Exu

  • Hecate

  • Hermes

  • Maria Padilha Pomga Gira

These spirits guard the crossroads, permitting and denying access as they deem fit.

Spirits are summoned via:

*Fragrance: In ancient Egypt, it was believed that every spirit possessed it own characteristic scent, sort of like the ghost in the move “The Uninvited.” The sudden appearance of the fragrance signaled the spirit’s presence. This fragrance becomes a summoning device: when you introduce the fragrance to atmosphere, you’re effectively extending an invitation. General magickal wisdom suggests that beautiful, aromatic fragrance (gardenia, frankincense, sandalwood) summon beautiful, powerful, benevolent spirits. Likewise offensive, foul, malodorous fragrances summon malicious, mean-spirited, malignant, destructive spirit forces.

*Altars on which they recognize themselves: Every spirit has one or more attribute: objects, emblems, birds, animal, minerals or things that represent their power or whose essence they share manipulating these objects like a tableau extends visual invitations. Hence a glass of spring water and a dish of honey beckons Oshun; she is sweet water and honey, each shares the same essence.

*Offerings: In general, spirits are not above bribery but rather consider it their due. Attract their attention and lure them to your side by offering whatever they love, whatever most attracts them and invigorates them.

Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells
by Judika Illes