Full Moon Magick

Gothic fantasy

Full Moon Magick

Definition:

The full moon is the point at which we can see an entire side of the moon. For magical purposes, most Wiccans and Pagans consider the full moon to include the day before and the day after a full moon, for a total of three days. If your tradition requires you to follow the phases of the moon for your magical workings, this is a good time to do rituals focused on personal growth and spiritual development.

Some examples would include:
Spells related to increasing your intuitive awareness
Healing magic
Rituals that connect you closely with deity, such as Drawing Down the Moon
Any magic related to developing your magical skills

For many Wiccans and Pagans, this is also a time to celebrate with an Esbat ritual.

Examples:

Willow and her coven celebrated the full moon with a ritual to hone their intuitive abilities.
 

Source

Author
Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

How To Draw Down the Moon

How To Draw Down the Moon

In this beautiful and powerful rite, the practitioner invokes the Goddess directly into herself (or himself, as the case may be). In some variations, a High Priestess (HPs) may go into a trancelike state and speak the words of the Goddess, or it may be a formal monologue calling upon the Goddess in her many forms. Regardless of how you practice it, Drawing Down the Moon is best performed on the night of the full moon, or on one of the nights immediately before.

While it’s more suitable to be performed outside, if the weather is inclement or your neighbors are easily startled, you can hold the ritual indoors.

Stand at your altar with your arms crossed over your chest, and feet together. Face towards the full moon. Say:

Goddess of the Moon, You have been known by many names in many lands in many times. You are universal and constant. In the dark of night, You shine down upon us and bathe us in Your light and love. I ask You, O Divine One, to honor me by joining with me, and allowing me to feel Your presence within my heart.

Move your feet apart to about shoulder width, and raise your arms up and out to welcome the Goddess into you. The next part is one that you can memorize and learn, or you can speak spontaneously from the heart. You will begin to feel a surge of energy, a palpable tingle – don’t worry, that’s the Goddess making Herself known to you. Feel free to change these words as you like. You are speaking for Her, in Her voice, so let Her say what She wishes.

Say:

“I am the Mother of all life, the One who watches over all. I am the wind in the sky, the spark in the fire, the seedling in the earth, the water in the river.

Continue:

“I am the vessel from which All Things spring forth. Honor Me from within your heart! Remember that acts of love and pleasure are My rituals, and that there is beauty in all things. Honor Me on this night of the full moon! I have been with you since the moment you were created, and shall remain with you always. Let there be beauty and strength, wisdom and honor, humility and courage within you. If you need Me, call upon Me and I shall come to you, for I am everywhere, always.

Honor Me as you seek knowledge! I am the Maiden, the Mother and the Crone, and I live within you.”

Feel the power of the Goddess within you. When you are ready, conclude with:

“I look down upon the sands of the desert, I crash the tides upon the shore, I shine on the mighty trees of the forests, and watch with joy as Life continues every cycle.

Be true to Me, honoring that which I have created, and I shall be true to you in return. With harm to none, so it shall be.”

Take a few moments to stand and bask in Her glow, and to meditate upon that which you have just experienced. Once the energy surge has subsided, lower your arms, and proceed with your ceremony as you normally would at the conclusion of a ritual.

Tips:

Drawing Down the Moon is an altered state of consciousness, a ritual possession by the Divine. It is not uncommon to feel the energy of the Goddess for quite some time following Drawing Down the Moon, so don’t be alarmed if you feel a heightened sense of clarity over the next few days. You may also feel extremely emotional — it’s not uncommon to cry or laugh spontaneously during this rite.

The above ritual is one that I created myself, but for more variations on Drawing Down the Moon, there are excellent versions in Wicca For One by Raymond Buckland (pp. 87 – 89 and The Grimoire of Lady Sheba (pp. 167 – 168).

 

 

Source:
Article Found On & Owned By About.com

A Little Humor – You might be a Redneck Pagan if…

You might be a Redneck Pagan if…

  • If you think “widdershins” refers to the calves of the bereaved lady next door….
  • If you think fetch deer is a command you give yer dawg….
  • If you think a goblet is a young turkey….
  • If you think Drawing Down the Moon means demolishing the outhouse….
  • If you call your coven mates “Bud” and “Sis”….
  • If you think a Great Rite is turning onto County Road 13….
  • If your Quarter candles smell like kerosene….
  • If you pronounce “Athame” as “Athaym” and “Samhain” as “Sammon” or “Sam-hayn”….
  • If you think a “Sidhe” is a girl….
  • If your idea of the “Goddess” is the Coors Swedish Bikini Ski Team….
  • If your Bard plays the banjo….
  • If your ‘Long Lost Friend really IS….
  • If your lawn is decorated with at least one, preferably two or more, plastic pink flamingos, whom you regard as your familiars….
  • If your Wand of Power is a cattle prod….
  • If your ceremonial belt has your name on the back and a belt buckle bigger than your head….
  • If you call the Quarters by invoking “Billy, Joe, Jim and Bob”….
  • If you call the Gods by hollerin’ “Hey y’all, watch me!”….
  • If your favorite robe has the logo of a manufacturer of major farm equipment on the back….
  • If you’ve ever harvested ritual herbs with a weed wacker….
  • If your ritual staff is a double barrel shotgun….
  • If your ritual garments include any one of the following: plaid flannels, long johns, a pistol belt, or cowboy boots….
  • If you’ve ever blessed chewing tobacco or snuff….
  • If your ritual wine is Maddog 20/20, Night Train or White Lady 21….
  • If the instructions to get to your Covenstead include the words “After you turn off the paved road”….
  • If your altar-cloth is a rebel flag….
  • If you use junk cars to mark the four corners of your circle….
  • If your Eternal Flame just happens to be under a still….
  • If you use an engine block for an altar….
  • If your High Priestess is your cousin – as well as your wife….
  • If, when drawing down the moon, you say, “Ya’ll come on down, ya hear?”….
  • If your pickup truck has an Athame rack….
  • If your crystal ball is made of polystyrene (i.e., a bowling ball)….
  • If your High Priestess has a spittoon on her altar….

You might be a Redneck Pagan!

Lighten Up – You Might be Giving Pagans a Bad Name If…

by Cather “Catalyst” Steincamp

 

You Might be Giving Pagans a Bad Name If…

You insist that your boss call you “Rowan Starchild” because otherwise you’d sue for religious harassment. (Score double for this if you don’t let that patronizing dastard call you “Mr. or Ms. Starchild.”)

You request Samhain, Beltaine, and Yule off and then gripe about working Christmas.

You expect your employer to exempt you from the random drug testing because of your religion.

You think the number of Wiccan books you own is far more important than the number you have read, regardless of the fact that most of your books are for beginners.

You’ve won an argument by referencing “Drawing Down the Moon,” knowing darned good and well they haven’t read it either.

You said it was bigotry when they didn’t let you do that ritual in front of city hall. It had nothing to do with the skyclad bit.

You picketed The Craft and Hocus Pocus, but thought that the losers who picketed The Last Temptation of Christ needed to get lives.

You’ve ever had to go along with someone’s ludicrous story because it was twice as likely to be true than most of the nonsense you spout.

You complain about how much the Native Americans copied from Eclectic Wiccan Rites.

You’ve ever referenced the Great Rite in a pick-up line.

Someone has had to point out to you that you do not enter a circle “in perfect love and perfect lust.” (Score double if you argued the point.)

You claim yourself as a witch because how early you were trained by the wise and powerful such-and-such of whom nobody has heard.

You claim to be a famtrad (hereditary), but you’re not. (Score double if you had to tell people you were adopted to pull this off.)

You claim to be a descendant of one of the original Salem Witches. (Score to a lethal degree if you don’t get this one.)

You think it’s perfectly reasonable to insist that, since every tradition is different, and no one tradition is right, there’s no reason not to do things your way.

You’ve ever been psychically attacked by someone who conveniently held a coven position you crave, and suddenly had a glimpse into their mind so you could see how evil they were.

You’ve ever affected an Irish or Scottish accent and insisted that it was real.

You think it’s your Pagan Duty to support the IRA, not because of any political beliefs you might share, but because, dammit, they’re Irish.

You talk to your invisible guardians in public. (Score double if you have met the Vampire Lestat or Dracula, triple if you got into a fight and escaped, or quadruple if it was no contest.)

You’ve ever confused the Prime Directive with the Wiccan Rede.

You’ve ever tried something you saw on “Sabrina, The Teenage Witch”

You’ve suddenly realized in the middle of a ritual that you weren’t playing D&D.

You’ve failed to realize at any point in the ritual that you weren’t playing D&D.

You’ve suddenly realized that you are playing D&D.

You hang out with people who each match at least fifteen of these traits.

You recognize many of these traits in yourself, but this test isn’t about you. But, boy, it’s right about those other folks.

Pocket Guide to Witchcraft

Pocket Guide to Witchcraft

Copyright Frater FP 1999

Last Modified 17/Oct/99

Pocket Witchcraft

1.Go for walks in the country and town (nature is everywhere)

2.Learn about the phases of the moon

3.Learn about the agricultural cycles and festivals

4.Learn about the astronomical cycles and festivals

5.Learn about herbs and healing

6.Practice candle magic

7.Intuitively develop your concept of a God and Goddess to represent Nature

8.Spend time outdoors or indoors making a shrine to these divinities

9.Worship these divinities in a suitable manner

10.Practise the healing and spellcraft you have learnt in the community

Notes

Witchcraft, Wicca and Paganism; you’ll need to decide what aspect to follow. In my view, Paganism

encompasses all aspects of a pagan lifestyle, and suits those with a view to bringing their entire life,

family and career into a pagan (country-dwelling) perspective. Witchcraft is the magical aspect of the

pagan lifestyle, and can be studied independently of becoming a Pagan – although many Pagans are

Witches, you don’t have to be a Witch to be a Pagan! Wicca is a more generic term for a modern angle

which takes from both Paganism and Witchcraft to make a blend more suited to a modern lifestyle and

modern mindsets. Many people become Wiccans before becoming Witches or Pagans! There are many

ways of looking at these definitions, of course, but the important thing is to establish your own personal

relationship to nature and the environment, and the courses of time and seasons – this is the heart of

the tradition. Having a representation of the God and Goddess is also a matter of personal orientation.

Some prefer Pan, an all-begetting, all-devouring masculine God, whilst others prefer Hecate, who can

be cruel and severe, or take the aspect of a gracious grandmother!

In Real Life …

The book ‘Drawing Down the Moon’ established in a survey that many following Pagan Paths were

working in the technological or educational sphere of work. There are many ways of integrating your

personal beliefs about paganism into your daily life, no matter how urban it might be. Remember, there

are now often as many foxes roaming towns as there are in the countryside! At my desk at work,

wherever I have worked, I have always had a bowl into which instead of paperclips or pot-pouri I have

placed items to remind me of the season. At the moment, approaching Samhain, I have an autumn leaf,

a small twig, a horse chestnut (conker) and a slightly rusting nail I found on a walk. The nail represents

the passing of summer, of course, but the whole piece is a small altar, where the bowl is the Pentacle,

the twig the Wand, the Horse Chestnut the Cup (it’s a hollow ).