MULTIFAITH CALENDAR – September 2021

Thanks for visiting Sewanee’s Multifaith Calendar! Created as a project of the Interfaith Advisory Council, this resource is meant to help our campus community know about some of the diverse religious and ethical holidays celebrated by members of the Sewanee community. Use it as you plan programming and schedule events, or to learn about the rich religious diversity that exists at Sewanee.

Though we’ve made every effort to be inclusive, this calendar is not exhaustive; we focused primarily on major holidays identified by practitioners of the traditions represented on campus. If we’ve missed something you’d like to see included, or if you see something you’d like to have corrected, please email Cassie Meyer, Director of Dialogue Across Difference Programs.

If you would like to observe an important religious or ethical holiday, but are struggling to find the resources to do so on campus, please email Cassie Meyer, Director of Dialogue Across Difference Programs and the University Chaplain, the Rev. Peter Gray. We want to work with you to help the Mountain feel like a religious and spiritual home for all.

September 2021

9/4-11 Jain: Paryushana, also known as the Festival of Forgiveness, lasts either eight or ten days and is a time of intensive study, reflection, and purification. It culminates with a day focused on confession and asking for forgiveness.

 

9/6-8 Jewish: Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown, and begins the Jewish New Year and the Days of Awe, a period of reflection on the past year and the year to come.

 

9/11 Coptic Orthodox Christian: Nayrouz (Coptic New Year) begins the new year for the Coptic Orthodox Church of Egypt.

 

9/15-16 Jewish: Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) begins at sundown on the 27th and ends at sundown on the 28th. A day of fasting and repentance, Yom Kippur marks the end of the Days of Awe or Days of Repentance, and is the holiest day in Judaism.

 

9/20-27 Jewish: Sukkot, or the Festival of Booths, begins at sundown on 9/20 and goes until 9/27. It is celebrated by the building of sukkot (sing. sukkah; outdoor shelters covered with greenery) as a commemoration of the autumnal harvest.

 

9/20 – 10/6 Hindu: Pitra Paksha is a 16 day holiday where many Hindus observe an all-vegetarian diet while also offering food to those in need.

 

9/21 – Various: Zhongqiu Jie (China), Chuseok (Korea), Tết Trung Thu (Vietnam) or Sampeah Preah Khae (Cambodia) is a harvest festival celebrated in much of East Asia and Southeast Asia. Traditions include viewing the full moon with family, eating moon cakes, reunions, and boat races.

 

9/21- 9/22 Pagan and Wiccan: Modron/Mabon (Autumnal Equinox) begins at sundown; sabbat is observed on the autumnal equinox. It is the first harvest holiday.

 

9/27-28 Muslim: Arba‘een, observed by Shi’a Muslims, begins at sundown and marks the end of the 40-day mourning period following Ashura, the anniversary of the martyrdom of Hussein ibn Ali, grandson of Islam’s prophet Muhammad.

 

9/28-29 Jewish: Simchat Torah marks the end of the annual cycle of Torah readings and the beginning of the new cycle.

One thought on “MULTIFAITH CALENDAR – September 2021

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.