Welcome to the Witches Digest for Wednesday, November 29th

Autumn Fairy
Welcome to the Witches Digest for Wednesday, November 29th

The Sun & Moon Data for Wednesday, November 29th (Those Above the Equator)

The Sun
Sun Direction: ↑ 145.05° SE
Sun Altitude: 23.14°
Sun Distance: 91.683 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 21, 2017 10:27 am (Winter)
Sunrise Today: 6:42 am↑ 117° Southeast
Sunset Today: 4:34 pm↑ 243° Southwest
Length of Daylight: 9 hours, 51 minutes

The Moon
Moon Direction: ↑ 27.95° NNE
Moon Altitude: -48.95°
Moon Distance: 233558 mi
Next Full Moon: Dec 3, 20179:46 am
Next New Moon: Dec 18, 201712:30 am
Next Moonrise: Today2:12 pm
Moon Phase: Waxing Gibbous
Moon Illumination: 78.9%

The Lunar Calendar
Moon Phase Tonight: Waxing Gibbous
Full Moon: Dec 3, 2017 at 9:46 am
(Next Phase)
First Quarter: Nov 26, 2017 at 11:02 am
(Previous Phase)

Source

timeanddate.com

The Sun & Moon Data for Thursday, November 30th (Those Below the Equator)

The Sun
Sun Direction: ↑ 152.63° SSE
Sun Altitude: -29.48°
Sun Distance: 91.683 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 22, 2017 3:27 am (Summer)
Sunrise Today: 5:37 am↑ 117° Southeast
Sunset Today: 7:50 pm↑ 243° Southwest
Hours of Daylight: 14 hours, 12 minutes

The Moon
Moon Direction: ↑ 277.71° W
Moon Altitude: 8.22°
Moon Distance: 233543 mi
Next Full Moon: Dec 4, 20172:46 am
Next New Moon: Dec 18, 20175:30 pm
Next Moonset: Today3:11 am
Current Moon Phase: Waxing Gibbous
Moon Illumination: 78.9%

The Lunar Calendar
Moon Phase Tonight: Waxing Gibbous
Full Moon: Dec 4, 2017 at 2:46 am
(Next Phase)
First Quarter: Nov 27, 2017 at 4:02 am
(Previous Phase)

Source

timeanddate.com

Overview of Your Daily Astronomy for November 29, 2017

The Moon spends the day in Aries, stimulating our pioneering instincts. We want to start fresh or come first. The Moon’s square to Pluto can introduce a conflict between wanting to push ahead and needing to use strategy.

The directness of Moon in Aries is weakened by a quincunx between Aries’ ruler, Mars, and Chiron which influences the day and is exact early tomorrow. We might doubt the effectiveness of our assertions or efforts to go after what we want, which can lead to passive-aggressive behavior, defensiveness, or frustration. We can find it difficult to be both assertive and sensitive now, and possibly see-saw between one and the other.

Overview of Your Daily Astronomy for November 30th (Those Below the Equator)

Early today, it can be difficult to assert ourselves effectively without provoking, annoying, or concerning others. The trick is to combine both sensitivity and directness instead of going for either/or. The Moon continues its transit of independent, competitive Aries until 3:39 PM EST, after which its transit of Taurus may help settle us down.

However, we’re building to a Mars-Uranus opposition, exact tomorrow morning, that’s potentially quite tense and can stimulate impatience. Tempers can flare and a tendency to take careless risks or jump into premature action is possible. We tend to challenge situations that make us feel restricted or people if they seem to be trying to hold us back. Arguments and confrontations are likely. Positively, this can be a time of more courage to free ourselves from restrictive circumstances or to push ourselves to break out of the routine and try new things. Confrontations may help clear the air.
A void of course Moon occurs from 1:38 PM EST, with the Moon’s last aspect before changing signs (a trine to Mercury), until the Moon enters Taurus at 3:39 PM EST.

Moon in Aries (Both Hemispheres)

 

We’re motivated by a strong desire to start fresh. A gut instinct to start something new is with us now, as well as the gumption to do so. Our pioneering impulses are strong, and we feel energetic, spontaneous, and enthusiastic. We may also be tactless and impulsive now. Excess energy is best channeled into physical activity.

The Moon in Aries generally favors the following activities: Quick actions that yield immediate results. Undertakings that involve the self and the personality. (Staying power may be lacking). Self-assertion, taking on challenges, beginning short-term projects.

The sky this week for November 29 to December 3

The First Quarter Moon brightens to Full as it’s joined by Mars, Mercury, Uranus, and Jupiter in the sky this week.
By Richard Talcott

Wednesday, November 29

The second-brightest asteroid of 2017 puts on a nice show during November. Minor planet 7 Iris rides high in the evening sky among the background stars of Aries the Ram. It glows at magnitude 7.7 and should be relatively easy to spot through binoculars even from the suburbs. This evening, you can locate Iris 0.5° due east of the magnitude 5.9 star 4 Arietis.

Thursday, November 30

The variable star Algol in Perseus reaches minimum brightness at 9:27 p.m. EST, when it shines at magnitude 3.4. If you start watching it after darkness falls this evening, you can see it more than triple in brightness, to magnitude 2.1, over the course of a few hours. This eclipsing binary star runs through a cycle from minimum to maximum and back every 2.87 days. Algol appears high in the northeastern sky after sunset and passes nearly overhead around 10:30 p.m. local time.

Algol can guide you to one of the finest binocular star clusters in the late autumn sky. Just after darkness falls, target the variable star through binoculars and place it at the bottom of your field of view. At the top of the field, you should see a hazy patch of light roughly the size of the Full Moon. This is M34, a collection of roughly 100 suns near Perseus’ border with Andromeda. Through 10×50 binoculars, M34’s brightest stars appear to twinkle against the unresolved glow of the cluster’s fainter members.

Friday, December 1

Uranus reached opposition more than a month ago, but it remains a tempting target. The outer planet appears in the southeast after darkness falls and climbs highest in the south around 9 p.m. local time. The magnitude 5.7 world lies in southeastern Pisces 3.2° west of the 4th-magnitude star Omicron (ο) Piscium. Although Uranus shines brightly enough to glimpse with the naked eye under a dark sky, binoculars make the task much easier. A telescope reveals the planet’s blue-green disk, which spans 3.7″.

Saturday, December 2

Head outside before dawn and you’ll find Jupiter blazing low in the southeast. The giant planet rises 2.5 hours before the Sun and climbs 15° high an hour before sunup. Jupiter shines at magnitude –1.7, which makes it the brightest point of light in the night sky, and resides among the much dimmer stars of the constellation Libra. A telescope reveals the planet’s 31″-diameter disk.

Sunday, December 3

Full Moon officially arrives at 10:47 a.m. EST, though it will look completely illuminated all night among the background stars of Taurus the Bull. The Full Moon rises close to sunset, appears highest in the south around midnight local time, and sets as the Sun comes up. Our satellite reaches its Full phase just 17 hours before its closest approach to Earth during its monthly orbit. The coincidence between these two events makes this the largest Full Moon of 2017, and you can expect to hear the phrase “Super Moon” used to describe it. Just how special is it? This Full Moon spans 33.4′, 7 percent larger than average. Most people won’t notice that small of a difference, but you can bet a lot of them will head out this evening, see the bright Moon hanging low above the horizon, and be amazed at its size. But this is an illusion — viewing the Moon near familiar foreground objects tricks the mind into thinking it looks bigger.

Source

The Astronomy Magazine

The Witches Current Moon Phase for November 29

Waxing Gibbous
Illumination: 78%

The Moon today is in a Waxing Gibbous phase. This phase is when the moon is more than 50% illuminated but not yet a Full Moon. The phase lasts round 7 days with the moon becoming more illuminated each day until the Full Moon. During a Waxing Gibbous the moon will rise in the east in mid-afternoon and will be high in the eastern sky at sunset. The moon is then visible though most of the night sky setting a few hour before sunrise. The word Gibbous first appeared in the 14th century and has it’s roots in the Latin word “gibbous” meaning humpbacked.

PHASE DETAILS FOR – WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2017

Phase: Waxing Gibbous
Illumination: 78%
Moon Age: 10.14 days
Moon Angle: 0.52
Moon Distance: 379,667.15 km
Sun Angle: 0.54
Sun Distance: 147,539,084.96 km

Source

MoonGiant.com

The Witches Moon Phase for Thursday, November 30 (Those Down Under)

Waxing Gibbous
Illumination: 86%

Tommorow the Moon will be in a Waxing Gibbous phase. This phase is when the moon is more than 50% illuminated but not yet a Full Moon. The phase lasts round 7 days with the moon becoming more illuminated each day until the Full Moon. During a Waxing Gibbous the moon will rise in the east in mid-afternoon and will be high in the eastern sky at sunset. The moon is then visible though most of the night sky setting a few hour before sunrise. The word Gibbous first appeared in the 14th century and has it’s roots in the Latin word “gibbous” meaning humpbacked.

PHASE DETAILS FOR – THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Phase: Waxing Gibbous
Illumination: 86%
Moon Age: 11.19 days
Moon Angle: 0.53
Moon Distance: 374,958.70 km
Sun Angle: 0.54
Sun Distance: 147,514,644.84 km

Source

MoonGiant.com

Where’s the moon? Waxing gibbous

By Deborah Byrd

This week’s waxing gibbous moon rises during the hours between noon and sunset. It sets in the wee hours after midnight. It falls between a first quarter moon and a full moon, and, it so happens, this upcoming full moon is a supermoon.

Any moon that appears more than half lighted but less than full is called a gibbous moon. The word gibbous comes from a root word that means hump-backed.

People often see a waxing gibbous moon in the afternoon, shortly after moonrise, while it’s ascending in the east as the sun is descending in the west. It’s easy to see a waxing gibbous moon in the daytime because, at this phase of the moon, a respectably large fraction of the moon’s dayside is now facing our way.

Source

DEBORAH BYRD

Deborah Byrd created the EarthSky radio series in 1991 and founded EarthSky.org in 1994. Today, she serves as Editor-in-Chief of this website. She has won a galaxy of awards from the broadcasting and science communities, including having an asteroid named 3505 Byrd in her honor. A science communicator and educator since 1976, Byrd believes in science as a force for good in the world and a vital tool for the 21st century. “Being an EarthSky editor is like hosting a big global party for cool nature-lovers,” she says.

Originally published on EarthSky

Top 4 keys to mastering moon phases

By Deborah Byrd

Why does the moon seem to change its shape every night? Why can I see the moon in the daytime?

The answer to both questions is the same. It’s that the moon is a world in space, just as Earth is. Like Earth, the moon is always half illuminated by the sun; the round globe of the moon has a day side and a night side. From our earthly vantage point, as the moon orbits around Earth, we see varying fractions of its day and night sides. These are the changing phases of the moon. And the moon is in the daytime sky about half the time. It’s just that it’s sometimes it’s so near the sun we don’t notice it. How can you understand moon phases? Here are four things to remember:

1. When you see the moon, think of the whereabouts of the sun. After all, it’s the sun that’s illuminating and creating the dayside of the moon.

Moon phases depend on where the moon is with respect to the sun in space. For example, do you see which moon phase is being shown in the illustration above? The answer is, it’s a full moon. The moon, Earth and sun are aligned with Earth in the middle. The moon’s fully illuminated half – its dayside – faces Earth’s night side. That’s always the case on the night of a full moon.

Don’t just take our word for it. Go outside. No matter what phase of the moon you see in your sky, think about where the sun is. It’ll help you begin to understand why the moon you see is in that particular phase.

2. The moon rises in the east and sets in the west, each and every day. It has to. The rising and setting of all celestial objects is due to Earth’s continuous daily spin beneath the sky.

Just know that – when you see a thin crescent moon in the west after sunset – it’s not a rising moon. Instead, it’s a setting moon.

At the same time, though …

3. The moon takes about a month (one moonth) to orbit the Earth. Although the moon rises in the east and sets in the west each day (due to Earth’s spin), it’s also moving on the sky’s dome each day due to its own motion in orbit around Earth.

This is a slower, less noticeable motion of the moon. It’s a motion in front of the fixed stars. If you just glance at the moon one evening – and see it again a few hours later – you’ll notice it has moved westward. That westward motion is caused by Earth’s spin.

The moon’s own orbital motion can be detected in the course of a single night, too. But you have to watch the moon closely, with respect to stars in its vicinity, over several hours.

The moon’s eastward, orbital motion is easiest to notice from one day (or night) to the next. It’s as though the moon is moving on the inside of a circle of 360 degrees. The moon’s orbit carries it around Earth’s sky once a month, because the moon takes about a month to orbit Earth.

So that the moon moves – with respect to the fixed stars – by about 12-13 degrees each day.

4. The moon’s orbital motion is toward the east. Each day, as the moon moves another 12-13 degrees toward the east on the sky’s dome, Earth has to rotate a little longer to bring you around to where the moon is in space.

Thus the moon rises, on average, about 50 minutes later each day.

The later and later rising times of the moon cause our companion world to appear in a different part of the sky at each nightfall for the two weeks between new and full moon.

Then, in two weeks after full moon, you’ll find the moon rising later and later at night.

Source

DEBORAH BYRD

Deborah Byrd created the EarthSky radio series in 1991 and founded EarthSky.org in 1994. Today, she serves as Editor-in-Chief of this website. She has won a galaxy of awards from the broadcasting and science communities, including having an asteroid named 3505 Byrd in her honor. A science communicator and educator since 1976, Byrd believes in science as a force for good in the world and a vital tool for the 21st century. “Being an EarthSky editor is like hosting a big global party for cool nature-lovers,” she says.

Originally published on EarthSky

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Your Survival Guide to Wednesdays!

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