Your Weekend Love Horoscopes for December 25-27

 

 

 

 

Weekend Love Horoscope

December 25-27: Nourishment

Maria DeSimone

Tarot.com is a Daily Insight Group Site

The Balance of the Elements & The Signs for Friday, December 25th

 

 

 

 

The Balance of the Elements & The Signs for Friday, December 25th

 

CANCER STRONG
Nurturing, protective, tenacious, emotional sensitive, watery, strong roots. Can be overly protective, unwilling to let go, timid, reclusive.
CAPRICORN STRONG
Disciplined, responsible, reliable, industrious, conscientious, practical, achieving. Can be pessimistic, overly conventional, rigid, materialistic, callous.

BALANCE OF ELEMENTS

FIRE WEAK
We are not very goal-oriented right now, or motivation to pursue our goals may be waning/lacking. Changes feel overwhelming. Enthusiasm may be low, we argue less, and we think more than we take action.
EARTH STRONG
We are especially in touch with the physical world. We consider what we’ve learned and experienced in the past in order to make the most of the present. We can be cautious, practical, and possibly unimaginative. We are deliberate and can pace ourselves well. We need hands-on experience and are not impressed with theory as much as we are with results. Routines are tolerable and comforting.
AIR WEAK
We may have a difficult time being objective or detached. We may not be especially communicative.

BALANCE OF MODES

CARDINAL STRONG
We are ready to take action and to take on challenges, and can become frustrated with stagnant conditions.
FIXED WEAK
We may be open to change but may not have much follow-through.

Astrology of Today – December 25, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

Astrology of Today – December 25, 2015

Summary:

  • The Moon is in Gemini until 12:26 AM.
  • The Moon is void until 12:26 AM (since 3:03 PM yesterday).
  • The Moon is in Cancer from 12:26 AM forward (until Sunday, December 27th, at 5:30 AM)
  • The Moon is waxing and in its Waxing Gibbous phase until 6:11 AM / the Moon is waning and in its Full Moon phase from 6:11 AM forward.
  • A Full Moon will occurs today at 6:11 AM.
  • Mercury is in its shadow phase (Mercury will be retrograde from January 5-25, 2016).
  • Uranus is stationary direct today.

The Witches Current Moon Phase for December 25th is Full Moon

Winter Animals

December 25
Full Moon
Illumination: 100%

The Moon today is in a Full Moon phase. During a Full Moon the moon is 100% illuminated as seen from Earth and is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun. The Moon will be visible throughout the night sky rising at sunset in the east and setting with the sunrise the next morning. The point at which a Full Moon occurs can be measured down to a fraction of a second. The time it takes between full moons is known as a Synodic month and is 29.530587981 days long.

Phase Details for – Friday, December 25, 2015

Phase: Full Moon
Illumination: 100%
Moon Age: 14.81 days
Moon Angle: 0.52
Moon Distance: 379,690.52 km

Sun Angle: 0.54
Sun Distance: 147,128,700.59 km

 

The Witches Magick for December 25th (especially since it is the Holidays) – To End Tiresome Visits

small winter world **** kleine Winterwelt
TO END TIRESOME VISITS

If you have company that stays too long and interferes with your life, try some of the following spells. None of them will harm visitors; they merely impel them to leave.

Three spells involve brooms. The simplest entails nothing more than placing a broom upside down behind the door. If the guests still refuse to leave, stick a fork into the bristles of the inverted broom.

Failing this, go into a room adjoining that which the guests are in, place the broom so that its handle points toward the offending visitors and intone the following traditional rhyme:

Get thee hence beyond my door
For I am weary to the core.

OTHER METHODS TO END TIRESOME VISITS

There are other methods as well. Throwing salt on an ungracious guest’s shoes (if he or she has removed them) is said to be effective, as is putting a pinch of pepper beneath his or her chair.

Hanging a pair of scissors at the front door might also work. If not, go to the kitchen, take the pestle out of the mortar and stand it upright in the fireplace.

Tracing an equal-armed cross in the hollow of the left hand with the index finger of the right should also give your guests an urge to leave (or will at least communicate your boredom).

If none of these measures works, even when backed up with visualizations, perhaps you should try the surest spell of all-ask your visitors to leave.

–Scott Cunningham; David Harrington. The Magical Household: Spells & Rituals for the Home

Ten Christmas Customs with Pagan Roots

WINTER WONDERLAND

Ten Christmas Customs with Pagan Roots

During the winter solstice season, we hear all kinds of cool stuff about candy canes, Santa Claus, reindeer and other traditions. But did you know that many Christmas customs can trace their roots back to Pagan origins? Here are ten little-known bits of trivia about the Yule season that you might be unaware of.
1. Christmas Caroling
The tradition of Christmas caroling actually began as the tradition of wassailing. In centuries past, wassailers went from door to door, singing and drinking to the health of their neighbors. The concept actually harkens back to pre-Christian fertility rites — only in those ceremonies, villagers traveled through their fields and orchards in the middle of winter, singing and shouting to drive away any spirits that might inhibit the growth of future crops. Caroling wasn’t actually done in churches until St. Francis, around the 13th century, thought it might be a nice idea.
2. Kissing Under the Mistletoe
Mistletoe has been around for a long time, and has been considered a magical plant by everyone from the Druids to the Vikings. The ancient Romans honored the god Saturn, and to keep him happy, fertility rituals took place under the mistletoe. Today, we don’t quite go that far under our mistletoe (at least not usually) but it could explain where the kissing tradition comes from. The Norse Eddas tell of warriors from opposing tribes meeting under mistletoe and laying down their arms, so it’s certainly considered a plant of peace and reconciliation. Also in Norse mythology, mistletoe is associated with Frigga, a goddess of love – who wouldn’t want to smooch under her watchful eye?
3. Gift-Delivering Mythical Beings
Sure, we’ve all heard of Santa Claus, who has his roots in the Dutch Sinterklaas mythology, with a few elements of Odin and Saint Nicholas thrown in for good measure. But how many people have heard of La Befana, the kindly Italian witch who drops off treats for well-behaved children? Or Frau Holle, who gives gifts to women at the time of the winter solstice?
4. Deck Your Halls with Boughs of Green Things
The Romans loved a good party, and Saturnalia was no exception. This holiday, which fell on December 17, was a time to honor the god Saturn, and so homes and hearths were decorated with boughs of greenery – vines, ivy, and the like. The ancient Egyptians didn’t have evergreen trees, but they had palms — and the palm tree was the symbol of resurrection and rebirth. They often brought the fronds into their homes during the time of the winter solstice. This has evolved into the modern tradition of the holiday tree.
5. Hanging Ornaments
Here come those Romans again! At Saturnalia, celebrants often hung metal ornaments outside on trees. Typically, the ornaments represented a god — either Saturn, or the family’s patron deity. The laurel wreath was a popular decoration as well. Early Germanic tribes decorated trees with fruit and candles in honor of Odin for the solstice.
6. Fruitcake
The fruitcake has become the stuff of legend, because once a fruitcake is baked, it will seemingly outlive everyone who comes near it. Stories abound of fruitcakes from winters past, magically appearing in the pantry to surprise everyone during the holiday season. What’s interesting about the fruitcake is that it actually has its origins in ancient Egypt. There’s a tale in the culinary world that the Egyptians placed cakes made of fermented fruit and honey on the tombs of their deceased loved ones – and presumably these cakes would last as long as the pyramids themselves. In later centuries, Roman soldiers carried these cakes into battle, made with mashed pomegranates and barley. There are even records of soldiers on Crusades carrying honey-laden fruitcakes into the Holy Land with them.
7. Presents for Everyone!
Today, Christmas is a huge gift-giving bonanza for retailers far and wide. However, that’s a fairly new practice, developed within the last two to three hundred years. Most people who celebrate Christmas associate the practice of gift giving with the Biblical tale of the three wise men who gave gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh to the newborn baby Jesus. However, the tradition can also be traced back to other cultures – the Romans gave gifts between Saturnalia and the Kalends, and during the Middle Ages, French nuns gave gifts of food and clothing to the poor on St. Nicholas’ Eve. Interestingly, up until around the early 1800s, most people exchanged gifts on New Years’ Day – and it was typically just one present, rather than the massive collection of gifts that we’re inundated with each year in today’s society.
8. The Resurrection Theme
Christianity hardly has a monopoly on the theme of resurrection, particularly around the winter holidays. Mithras was an early Roman god of the sun, who was born around the time of the winter solstice and then experienced a resurrection around the spring equinox. The Egyptians honored Horus, who has a similar story. While this doesn’t mean that the tale of Jesus and his rebirth was stolen from the cult of Mithras or Horus – and in fact, it’s definitely not, if you ask scholars – there are certainly some similarities in the stories, and perhaps some carryover from the earlier Pagan traditions.
9. Christmas Holly
For those who celebrate the spiritual aspects of Christmas, there is significant symbolism in the holly bush. For Christians, the red berries represent the blood of Jesus Christ as he died upon the cross, and the sharp-edged green leaves are associated with his crown of thorns. However, in pre-Christian Pagan cultures, the holly was associated with the god of winter – the Holly King, doing his annual battle with the Oak King. Holly was known as a wood that could drive off evil spirits as well, so it came in very handy during the darker half of the year, when most of the other trees were bare.

10. The Yule Log
Nowadays, when we hear about the Yule log, most people think of a deliciously rich chocolate dessert. But the Yule log has its origins in the cold winters of Norway, on the night of the winter solstice, where it was common to hoist a giant log onto the hearth to celebrate the return of the sun each year. The Norsemen believed that the sun was a giant wheel of fire which rolled away from the earth, and then began rolling back again on the winter solstice.

Source:
By Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on and owned by About.com

 

Celebrating Spirituality, Legends & Folklore 365 Days a Year, for December 25th – Christmas Eve, Christmas, Yule

Winter time..

December 25

Christmas Eve, Christmas, Yule

 

It is generally accepted that the birth of Christ on December 24th is the invention of some overzealous authors who were trying to create some sort of symmetry between Paganism and Christianity. According to the late fourth-century Scriptor Syrus, it was the custom of the Pagans to celebrate the birthday of the sun on December 25, at which time they kindled lights in token of festivity. The Christians also participated in these solemnities and revelries. Accordingly, when the administrants of the church observed that the Christians had a preference for the festival, they took counsel and resolved that the true Nativity should be solemnized on that day.

The Pagan feast that was replaced by Christmas was of far older origins and may have been built upon the cult of Mithras, who, for the Persians, was the creator of the universe and manifestation of the Creative Logos, or Word. His birth on December 25 was witnessed by shepherds. After many deeds, he held a last supper with his disciples and then returned to heaven. Some believe that, had Christianity not taken hold when it did, Mithraism very well might have become the world religion.

For more that three centuries Christ Mass was a moveable feast, celebrated on the Epiphany (January 6), the day that, according to biblical account, Jesus manifested himself to the Magi. The Western date of December 25 was fixed to coincide with the Roman midwinter festival of the Kalends, which was preceded by seven days of tribute to their God of agriculture, Saturn.

Many of the Yuletide customs we observe today were common to various thanksgiving days and new year’s rites. For example, the hanging of greenery comes from an old ivy-worshiping worshiping cult dating back to the Dionysian revels in ancient Greece; mistletoe was valued-almost worshiped-by the Druids; ids; and gift exchange most likely generated with the Saturnalia. The Christmas tree was introduced by the Prince Albert of Saxony in 1844 and was an adaption of the Paradeisbaum(decorated tree of life) from the medieval drama of the Tannenbaum.

The Witches Correspondences for Friday, December 25th

Christmas with animals ::: Weihnachten mit Tieren
FRIDAY CORRESPONDENCES

Venus/Water/East/West/South/Dawn/Female/Libra/Taurus

 

Magickal Intentions: Love, Romance, Marriage, Sexual Matters, Physical Beauty, Friendship and Partnerships, Strangers, Heart

Color: aqua, blue, light blue, brown, green, pale green, magenta, peach, pink, rose, white, all pastels

Number: 5, 6

Metal: copper

Charm: green or white garments, scepter

Stone: alexandrite, amethyst, coral, diamond, emerald, jade, jet, black moonstone, peridot, smoky quartz, tiger’s-eye, pink tourmaline

Animal: camel, dove, elephant, goat, horse, pigeon, sparrow

Plant: apple, birch, cherry, clematis, clove, coriander, heather, hemlock, hibiscus, ivy, lotus, moss, myrtle, oats, pepperwort, peppermint, pinecone, quince, raspberry, rose, pink rose, red rose, rose hips, saffron, sage, savin, stephanotis, strawberry, thyme, vanilla, verbena, violet, water lily, yarrow, and all flowers

Incense: ambergris, camphor, mace, musk, myrrh, rose, saffron, sage, sandalwood, sweetgrass, vanilla, violet, all floral scents

Goddess: Aphrodite, Asherah, Baalith, Brigid, Erzulie, Freya (Passionate Queen), Frigg, Gefion, Harbor (Beautiful One), Hestia, Inanna, Ishtar (Lady of Passion and Desire), Lakshmi, Lilith, Mokosh, Nehalennia, Nerthus, Ostara, Pombagira, Sarasvati, Shakti, Shekinah, Sirtur, Al Uzza, Venus (Queen of Pleasure), Vesta

God: Allah, Bacchus, Bes, Cupid, the Dagda, Dionysus, El, Eros (God of Love), Freyr, Frit Ailek, Shukra

Evocation: Agrat Bat Mahalat, Anael, Hagiel, Mokosba, Rasbid, Sachiel, Uriel, Velas

Courtesy of Moonlight Musings

When The Full Moon Falls on Friday, The Perfect Spell – Making Love Grow Spell

Winter Time

Making Love Grow Spell

• 1 African violet plant-a pink blooming variety is best (if for some reason you cannot find a pink blooming violet, go with a white variety; white is an all-purpose color)
• 1 pink votive candle
• 1 votive candle cup
• A pin or nail to engrave the candle with the symbol of Venus
• A small tumbled rose quartz stone to increase warm, fuzzy feelings
• Lighter or matches
• A safe, flat surface on which to set up the spell

Again, I would suggest working this spell out under the moonlight or at least near a window that allows you a view of the full moon. To start, set the African violet and the rose quartz stone in the center of your working area. Take the pin and gently carve the planetary symbol of Venus into the side of the votive candle. Drop the votive inside of the cup, and set it to one side. Take a few moments to visualize the spirit of love blessing  your home. Feel the fun and the joy of love, and let it fill up your heart. Now light the candle, and place your hands on either side of the potted plant. Repeat the following verse:

Under the light of Friday’s full moon
I ask the Goddess to grant me a boon
By the energy of a Venus flower
Mix with this a rose quartz’s warm, fuzzy powers
Bless this home with love and your grace
Let it expand out and fill up this place.
Close the spell with these lines:
By flower petal and moonlight, this spell is begun
For the good of all, this witchery brings harm to none.

Pocket the rose quartz stone and keep it with you. Care for your houseplant, and enjoy the richness of love that is sure to bless your days and your home.
 

–Ellen Dugan, Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week

 

Now Is The Time To Make The Perfect Batch of Moon Water

WINTER ANIMALS
Now Is The Time To Make The Perfect Batch of Moon Water

Moon water is really simple to make and can be used for all sorts of spell work, rituals and anointing. It is useful to have in stock when you need to use the power of the Moon phase at a different time.

Using a dish, bowl or bottle, fill it with spring water and leave it outside (if it can be safely done) or on a windowsill so that it can soak up the power of the Full Moon. You can also do the same process of the New, Waxing, Waning or Dark Moon Phases too. Once the water has absorbed the power of the Moon, you can keep it in an airtight bottle for future use.

You can also add a pinch of sea salt to the water giving it extra cleansing and purifying oomph.

-Rachel Patterson, Pagan Portals – Moon Magic

The Full Moon

Winter Wonderland
The Full Moon

This is a good time to try out forms of divinations such as scrying or tarot. Reflect about your goals, feelings and matters that have to do with relationship and family. It is also good for transformations, psychic abilities, strength, love, power and fertility.

The Full Moon is also an excellent time to cleanse, purify and charge your crystals. Lay them out so that the moonlight can hit them; if you can do so safely, leave them outside. If not, find a windowsill that catches the moonlight. Don’t just stop at crystals though, your magical tools will also benefit from soaking up the power of the moonlight.

As the Full Moon just passes, the time arrives to put the finishing touches on what you have been doing and to get ready for the quieter time to come. Enjoy beauty and art, listen to music. If you have argued with someone but do not feel the issues are really vital, make up now.

If you live near the sea the Full Moon is a wonderful time to visit the shoreline and (if safe and legal to do so) build a small fire. Collect small pieces of driftwood to build your fire and, as you lay each piece onto the fire, add a wish. Once the fire is burning nicely, cast offerings into the flames as gifts to the Moon Goddess, such as herbs, flowers and leaves. Sit and watch as the fire burns. If you don’t live near the sea you could turn this into a visualization for a Full Moon meditation.

-Rachel Patterson, Pagan Portals – Moon Magic

The Witches Almanac for Friday, December 25th

Spirit Of The Winter Animals!
The Witches Almanac for Friday, December 25th

Friday (Venus): Love, friendship, reconciliation and beauty.

Christmas Day

Waxing Moon
The Waxing Moon (from the New Moon to the Full) is the ideal time for magic to draw things toward you.

Full Moon 6: 12 am
The Full Moon is the time of greatest power.

Moon Sign: Gemini
Gemini: Things begun now are easily changed by outside influence. Time for shortcuts, communication, games, and fun.

Moon enters Cancer 12: 27 am
Cancer: Stimulates emotional rapport between people. Pinpoints need, supports growth and nurturance. Tends to domestic concerns.

Incense: Vanilla

Color: White

The Pagan Calendar for Friday, December 25th

Winter Animals-1The Pagan Calendar for Friday, December 25th

Dies Natalis Solis Invicti (‘the birthday of the unconquered sun’) (Roman) – The title Sol Invictus had been applied to a number of solar deities. Many Oriental cults were practised informally among the Roman legions from the mid-second century, but only that of Sol Invictus was officially accepted. Sol Invictus was identified with the earlier Roman sun god Sol. This is the traditional birth date of sun gods and gods with solar attributes such as Pryderi, Frey, Saturn, Dionysus, Adonis, Attis, Tammuz, Baalim, Quetzalcoatl, Mithra and Zeus.

Juvenalia – After the Saturnalia, the Romans celebrated the birth of new life with a festival honouring children, who were given talisman (like bells, shoes, warm clothese and toys) for good luck in the coming year.

Saint Anastasia’s Day – Yet another Christian virgin whose chastity was threatened by a Roman Pagan. This time the Roman prefect thought he was embracing Anastasia, when in face he was making love to the cooking pots and kitchen utensils. When he emerged from his imaginary amorous encounter he was covered with soot, and his servants thought him a demon, and chased him away with blows.

Anna Franklin, Yule (The Eight Sabbats)

Friday’s Witchery

Winter Animals
Friday’s Witchery

Love magick is a perennial popular topic. However, there is more to this topic than meets the eye. There are many enchanting layers here for us to explore on this day of the week. What about creating a loving home, or producing a loving and nurturing family? What about keeping your intimate relationships vital and on track? How about promoting happy, healthy, and enduring friendships? See, there is more to be considered than just the “You shall be mine…” type of fictional love spell.

Don’t forget that many of the deities associated with Fridays are also parents. So, yes, while this is the day to work on romance, sex, and love spells, there is additional magick to be considered here, which makes Fridays a more well-rounded and bigger opportunity for witchery than many folks ever truly realize. The truest, strongest magick always comes from the heart.

–Ellen Dugan, Book of Witchery – Spells, Charms & Correspondences For Every Day of the Week