Herb of the Day for September 17th is Marsh Mallow

Herb of the Day

Marsh Mallow

(Althaea officinalis)

 

Medicinal Uses: Marsh Mallow is useful in inflammation and irritation of the alimentary canal, and of the urinary and respiratory organs. The dry roots boiled in water give out half their weight of a gummy matter like starch. Decoctions of the plant, especially of the root, are very useful where the natural mucus has been abraded from the coats of the intestines.

The decoction can be made by adding 5 pints of water to 1/4 lb. of dried root, boiling down to 3 pints and straining: it should not be made too thick and viscid.

It is very useful in painful complaints of the urinary tract, exerting a relaxing effect upon the passages. This decoction is also effective in curing bruises, sprains or any ache in the muscles or sinews. In cases of hemorrhage from the urinary tract and in dysentery, it has been recommended to use the powdered root boiled in milk. The action of Marsh Mallow root upon the bowels is unequaled by any other astringency. Mallow is a very soothing demulcent. It can be used internally as a cough preparation.

The flowers, boiled in oil and water, with a little honey and alum, have proved good as a gargle for sore throats.

Teas made from marsh mallow may be taken up to three times a day. Marsh mallow leaf tea may be made by adding 2 to 5 teaspoons of dried leaf to about 5 ounces of hot but not boiling water, allowing it to soak for 10 minutes, and then straining out the solid particles. For marsh mallow root tea, place 2 to 5 teaspoons of the dried powdered root in about 5 ounces of warm water and let it soak for at least an hour before straining out the solids. The resulting tea may be heated or consumed cold. Drink three to five cups a day.

For use on the skin, shredded or powdered marsh mallow root may be mixed with enough warm water to form a thick paste, which may be spread onto a soft cloth. The resulting poultice may be heated or simply applied to irritated skin as often as needed. If the skin at the area where marsh mallow is applied blisters or becomes more irritated, the marsh mallow preparation should be washed off with warm water and it should not be re-applied.

Marsh Mallow may possibly reduce blood sugar levels, individuals with diabetes should be careful when taking it.

Magickal Uses: Place a bouquet of mallow in a vase in your window to attract a straying lover.

Culinary Uses: The mallow root was used to make the French candy, pâté de guimauve, which is the original “marshmallow.” The root is also good lightly steamed and then fried with butter and onions. Add the tender young leaves to salads.

Properties: Demulcent, anti-inflammatory and emollient. Marsh Mallow contains starch, mucilage, pectin, oil, sugar, asparagin, phosphate of lime, glutinous matter and cellulose.

Growth: Marsh Mallow is a very hardy perennial. It likes moist, light soil with a neutral pH in full sun. The Marsh Mallow plants consist of tall, thick stems with broad leaves that are covered in soft hairs.

 

 

Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

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