Today’s Quiz – ‘What Mask Do You Wear?’

What Mask Do You Wear? Quiz

One of the first steps toward creating a life that fills us with joy and  contentment is recognizing the role we play that may be keeping us confined in  unhappy, unsatisfying patterns of behavior. Most of us learned our roles early  in childhood, but after a certain point, those masks we wear stopped helping us.  Which mask do you wear?

Take this quiz to see which role you play. You may recognize the masks your  loved ones wear, too!

1. Do you often find yourself thinking, “It should be like THIS” or “They’re  doing it WRONG”?

2. Does your striving for perfection sometimes drive you crazy?

3. Do you feel like you will never be good enough?

4. Do you often tell yourself, “I can’t help it” or “It’s not my fault”?

5. Do you find yourself looking to the past and thinking, “It would have been  alright if only. . .”

6. Do you look to the future and think “Everything will be alright  when. . .”

7. Do you sometimes do things because you think you should or you feel  obligated to, but you really don’t want to?

8. Do you commonly tell yourself that making others happy is more important  than what you need or feel?

9. Do you often say yes when you really want to say no?

10. Do you often rush in to help people and fix it for them?

If you answered “yes” to 1, 2 or 3, you may be wearing the mask of the  Judge. The Judge is the mouthpiece of the Demon of Perfection that says,  no matter how good it gets, it will never be good enough.

 

If you answered “yes” to 4, 5, or 6, you may be wearing the mask of the  Victim. The Victim makes up “poor me” stories and is rarely in a state of  gratitude or in the present moment.

If you answered “yes” to 7, 8, 9, 10, or 11, you may be wearing the mask of  the Prostitute/Rescuer. The Prostitute pretends to be anything you want  her to be, compromising herself to get what she wants–which is usually love and  acceptance. She hides the truth of how she really feels. The Rescuer is the more  respectable face of this mask–the Nurse endlessly mopping the brows of the  wounded, the Hero rushing in to make everything better. The problem with this  mask is that it subtly (or not so subtly!) tells people, “I don’t respect you  enough to believe you can do this yourself.”

There is no shame in having learned to play one of these roles. Most of us  did. But we can all learn how to gently put aside the masks that hide our  authentic selves

 

What Mask Do You Wear? Quiz

What Mask Do You Wear? Quiz

One of the first steps toward creating a life that fills us with joy and  contentment is recognizing the role we play that may be keeping us confined in  unhappy, unsatisfying patterns of behavior. Most of us learned our roles early  in childhood, but after a certain point, those masks we wear stopped helping us.  Which mask do you wear?

Take this quiz to see which role you play. You may recognize the masks your  loved ones wear, too!

1. Do you often find yourself thinking, “It should be like THIS” or “They’re  doing it WRONG”?

2. Does your striving for perfection sometimes drive you crazy?

3. Do you feel like you will never be good enough?

4. Do you often tell yourself, “I can’t help it” or “It’s not my fault”?

5. Do you find yourself looking to the past and thinking, “It would have been  alright if only. . .”

6. Do you look to the future and think “Everything will be alright  when. . .”

7. Do you sometimes do things because you think you should or you feel  obligated to, but you really don’t want to?

8. Do you commonly tell yourself that making others happy is more important  than what you need or feel?

9. Do you often say yes when you really want to say no?

10. Do you often rush in to help people and fix it for them?

If you answered “yes” to 1, 2 or 3, you may be wearing the mask of the  Judge. The Judge is the mouthpiece of the Demon of Perfection that says,  no matter how good it gets, it will never be good enough.

If you answered “yes” to 4, 5, or 6, you may be wearing the mask of the  Victim. The Victim makes up “poor me” stories and is rarely in a state of  gratitude or in the present moment.

If you answered “yes” to 7, 8, 9, 10, or 11, you may be wearing the mask of  the Prostitute/Rescuer. The Prostitute pretends to be anything you want  her to be, compromising herself to get what she wants–which is usually love and  acceptance. She hides the truth of how she really feels. The Rescuer is the more  respectable face of this mask–the Nurse endlessly mopping the brows of the  wounded, the Hero rushing in to make everything better. The problem with this  mask is that it subtly (or not so subtly!) tells people, “I don’t respect you  enough to believe you can do this yourself.”

There is no shame in having learned to play one of these roles. Most of us  did. But we can all learn how to gently put aside the masks that hide our  authentic selves.

Daily OM for August 18 – Taking the Risk

Taking the Risk

Permission to Be Real

byMadisyn Taylor

When we present ourselves to the world without a mask and keep it real, we offer the same opportunity for others to do the same.

Most of us are familiar with the idea of keeping it real and have an intuitive sense about what that means. People who keep it real don’t hide behind a mask to keep themselves safe from their fear of how they might be perceived. They don’t present a false self in order to appear more perfect, more powerful, or more independent. People who keep it real present themselves as they truly are, the good parts and the parts most of us would rather hide, sharing their full selves with the people who are lucky enough to know them.

Being real in this way is not an easy thing to do as we live in a culture that often shows us images of physical and material perfection. As a result, we all want to look younger, thinner, wealthier, and more successful. We are rewarded externally when we succeed at this masquerade, but people who are real remind us that, internally, we suffer. Whenever we feel that who we are is not enough and that we need to be bigger, better, or more exciting, we send a message to ourselves that we are not enough. Meanwhile, people who are not trying to be something more than they are walk into a room and bring a feeling of ease, humor, and warmth with them. They acknowledge their wrinkles and laugh at their personal eccentricities without putting themselves down.

People like this inspire us to let go of our own defenses and relax for a moment in the truth of who we really are. In their presence, we feel safe enough to take off our masks and experience the freedom of not hiding behind a barrier. Those of us who were lucky enough to have a parent who was able to keep it real may find it easier to be that way ourselves. The rest of us may have to work a little harder to let go of our pretenses and share the beauty and humor of our real selves. Our reward for taking such a risk is that as we do, we will attract and inspire others, giving them the permission to be real too.

Daily OM for July 16 – Uncover Your True Face

Uncover Your True Face
Underneath the Mask

Many of us know the feeling of being stuck in a particular role within our families, as if we are wearing masks whenever we see the people we love. Maybe we are the good daughters, expected to always please others, or perhaps we are the family clowns, expected to be jovial and make everyone laugh. This same scenario can play out within a work situation or a group of friends. We may be so good at our role that we hardly even notice that we are wearing a mask, and yet, deep down, we know that we are not free to simply be who we really are. This can leave us feeling unseen and uneasy.

There is nothing inherently wrong with wearing a mask or playing a role. It is a natural part of any social dynamic and it can even be creative and fun. It only becomes a problem when you feel that you have no other choice than to wear that mask, and this is especially challenging if you realize you are never without one. Perhaps you have forgotten who you really are-a vast and unrestricted being of light-and have identified yourself completely with a role. You may be the dutiful, caring son who keeps his parents’ dysfunctional marriage intact. You may be the angelic wife who enables your husband to continue on a destructive path. You may be the cheerful daughter to a deeply depressed mother. Whatever the case, knowing the motivation behind your performance-the function of your mask-can help to uncover your true face.

Anytime we find ourselves stuck behind a mask, it is an indication that we are entangled in a dysfunctional dynamic in which our true self cannot be seen. We have been placed in this situation for the purpose of our own healing and, in some cases, the healing of others. From this perspective, life can be seen as a series of situations that call us to remove our masks-gently, and with great compassion for all concerned-to reveal the beauty underneath.