‘THINK on THESE THINGS’ for April 10th

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Have you ever stood on the sidelines and watched the drama of your own difficulties being acted out in someone else’s life? Does it provoke a feeling of gratitude that here I will witness something that will help me solve my own problems? Or does it invite a feeling of smugness that they were not so capable of hiding theirs as I have been of concealing mine.

Hiding one’s difficulties can be compared to concealing an elephant. The only possible way to keep it a secret would be to keep it from those who could care less in the first place. If there were face to face with your elephant they would register little surprise and proceed to immediately forget it.

In fact, there is considerable danger in looking down on those who are trying to get their lives on the right track. At least they have the intestinal fortitude to try. And to pretend that one has nothing to overcome is merely polishing the front glass while the back door falls away.

Smugness or compassion? It was Cowper who reminded us, “Man may dismiss compassion from his heart, but God will never.”

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

Elder’s Meditation of the Day
By White Bison, Inc., an American Indian-owned nonprofit organization. Order their many products from their web site:
http://www.whitebison.org

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Elder’s Meditation of the Day – April 10

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – April 10

“Together we can end the Holocaust against the environment.”

–Haida Gwaii, Traditional Circle of Elders

We are all familiar with the Holocaust against the people. When this happens we feel bad and we vow never to let it happen again. We need to seriously examine what human beings are doing to the Earth and the environment. Many species are extinct and many more will become extinct during the next 10 years. We are methodically eliminating life that will never return again. Today, we should take time to pray real hard so we wake up before it is too late.

Great Spirit, today, I pray for us to awaken to what we are doing.

April 10 – Daily Feast

April 10 – Daily Feast

There is a delightful piety involved when the other person is caught in wrongdoing. Sometimes we don’t give much thought to the idea that someone made a mistake. He should have been more clever! Far too many get a lift when someone falls. It makes the sideliners look so good, and self-righteousness flows with great solemnity. But when the limelight hits home and attention focuses on a closer problem – where did all the compassion go? What is happening to human kindness? After all, are we not all too human not to err? Kindness is a two-way street. Harsh judgment and joy in seeing someone else hurt because they seem to deserve it, opens the door to let others judge us. So, then, where is all the compassion?

~ Little pot, do not call the kettle black until you have been in the fire as long as he has! ~

SEQUICHIE GRANDMOTHER

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

The Daily Motivator for April 10th – Feel the connection

Feel the connection

Feel your connection to others. Feel your connection to all of life, and to all that is.

Focus your awareness in a place where there is no conflict. Live at a place of acceptance and peaceful power.

Realize that you can do no harm to others without doing harm to yourself. Realize that the goodness you give is the goodness you experience.

Understand that your negative thoughts actually do create negative reality. See that your love does indeed make the world a better place.

Choose to live from a higher perspective, at a higher level of energy than the problems. Rise above the meaningless distractions and invest your time and effort in what truly matters.

Live each moment with the simple yet powerful idea that there is goodness and value to be found everywhere. Feel your connection with life’s goodness, and let it grow ever more abundant through your presence.

— Ralph Marston
Source:
The Daily Motivator

The Daily OM for April 10th – Compelled to Create

Compelled to Create
Embracing Your Muse

by Madisyn Taylor

Nearly all creative possibilities are related to the muses that inspire us.

Inspiration is an intangible yet inseparable part of the creative process. Nearly all creative possibilities are related to the muses that inspire us. The ancient Greeks believed that all creation, whether artistic or scientific in nature, was motivated by goddesses who served as the literal embodiment of inspiration. These were the Muses—the givers of the creative spark. We still rely on muses to drive the creative process, though ours may take a diverse range of forms. People we meet, intriguing ideas, movies, books, nature, and cultural ideals all have the potential to awaken our imaginative minds. When we are touched by our muses, we understand viscerally that we are capable of producing our own unique kind of greatness.

Many people move through life unaware of the presence of their muse. This lack of awareness can be compounded by the fact that we may have one muse that remains with us throughout our lives, multiple muses that inspire us concurrently, several muses that come and go as necessary, or a single muse that touches us briefly at specific moments. You will know that you have found your muse when you encounter a force that makes you feel courageous enough to broaden the range of your creativity. The presence of this force will erase your self-doubt and motivate you to give your thoughts and feelings form. Should your muse continue to elude you, however, there are steps you can take to increase your chances of falling under its inspired influence. If you surround yourself with people who support you, keep a pen and paper handy, immerse yourself in culture, and brainstorm frequently, you will soon reconnect with your muse.

Once you have identified your muse, embrace it by giving yourself over to the creative inspiration it provides. No matter what you are moved to create, you will find that neither fear nor criticism can penetrate the wonderful bliss that goes hand in hand with the act of taking an idea and turning it into something the whole world can enjoy.

 

Source:
The Daily OM

The Wiccan Way

Witchy Comments & Graphics

The Wiccan Way

by Lady Beckett of Circle Atheneum in San Diego, CA in 1988.

Recognizing that there is more than one path to spiritual enlightenment and that Wicca is but one of many, and that Wicca holds within itself the belief that there is more than one type of step set to the spiral dance, find here listed common denominators of the Craft.

That there is above all the Goddess in her three-fold aspect and many are her names. With all her names we call her Maiden, Mother and Crone.

That there is the God, consort and son, giver of strength and most willing of sacrifice.

That and it harm none, do what ye will shall be the law.

That each of her children are bound by the three-fold law and that whatever we create, be it joy or sorrow, laughter or pain, is brought back to us three-fold.

That as she is the mother of all living things and we are all her children, we seek to live in harmony not only with each other, but with the planet earth that is our womb and home.

That life upon the earth is not a burden to be born, but a joy to be learned and shared with others.

That death is not an ending of existence, but a step in the on-going process of life.

That there is no sacrifice of blood, for She is the mother of all living things, and from her all things proceed and unto her all things must return.

That each and everyone of the children who follow this path has no need of another between themselves and the Goddess, but may find Her within themselves.

That there shall not by intent be a desecration of another’s symbols of beliefs, for we are all seeking harmony within the One.

That each person’s faith is private unto themselves and that another’s belief is not to be set out and made public.

That the Wiccan way is not to seek converts, but that the way be made open to those who for reasons of their own seek and find the Craft.

And as it is willed, so mote it be.

5 Herbs That Are Best Purchased As Plants

5 Herbs That Are Best Purchased As Plants

What Herbs Should I Buy Instead Of Starting From Seed?

By , about.com

Why, you might wonder, would someone want to avoid starting herbs from seed? This is such a great way to start your herb garden for pennies. Starting an herb garden from plants, is also a good way to start. In my garden, all the herbs that are purchased instead of started as seeds, fall under these areas:

  • They are fussy to start from seed (I am a busy, impatient gardener)
  • They don’t have a snowball’s chance of growing to any useful size in my zone (which is why a good nursery is always so important)
  • They are perennial, and I am only going to grow a single plant
  • I need to replace an established perennial

1. Rosemary

Rosemary is one of those herbs that demands attention. Unless living in a Mediterranean zone, Rosemary needs to be able to come and go in the outdoor environment according to the temperature. This is not as difficult as it seems. In my garden, my rosemary gets planted pot-in-pot, so I can move it inside when we get our endless rains, and back to the garden until the fall temperatures start to loom.Rosemary plants just make sense. They can be matched for size and shape, and if you (like me) kill one, it is simple enough to pop out and replace with a fresh, new plant.

2. Lemongrass

Lemongrass, and herbs like it, should be purchased as plants. They are fussy and sensitive to temperature fluctuation, so for many of us growing lemongrass would be nearly impossible.

Buy these as small plants, and enjoy them throughout the season. They tolerate sun to partial shade and make wonderful focal points. We buy trays of lemongrass, and keep them in the greenhouse. That way, they can be harvested all season without worry that our crazy Nebraska weather will harm a leaf.

Lemongrass is great when used right from the freezer, so grow some if you can find the plants. Once fall hits, bring them in and freeze whole.

3. Lavender

Lavender is such a beloved herb, it is frustrating for many gardeners to struggle growing it from seed. Although not impossible, why bother when there are so many plants available?

Buying lavender as plants, also allows you to select the varieties that are proven to grow well in your location. I also recommend buying a LOT of plants. Lavender always looks better in groupings, and buying them at the same time will ensure your plants are the same size.

4. Beebalm

Bee balm and other ornamental herbs, are best purchased as plants. Why take a chance on growing the wrong variety, or something that won’t thrive in your location? Ornamental herbs are the quintessential reason for shopping at nurseries to begin with. Choose plants that your nursery owner recommends. They will guide you to the colors, and types of plants that will have the best chance of survival.

5. Medicinal Herbs

Medicinal herbs, which for this article refer to actual herbs that are grown for their healing property, should be grown from plant unless the gardener is familiar with herbal medicine. There are many wonderful places to buy medicinal herb plants. Start with a small garden of purchased plants, and as your skill grow (see how I did that?), you can then start identifying herbs that might be grown from seed or found in the wild.

I like to buy medicinal herbs that are possibly expensive for me to kill. This means I will take much better care of a purchased plant, than I would a few seeds in the soil.

Transplant Shock and How to avoid It

Transplant Shock and How to avoid It

Transplant Herbs Successfully

By , About.com

Throughout the growing season, transplanting herbs is a great way to keep the garden looking fresh and full. Transplanting can also save you money, if you propagate new plants and then add them to your garden landscape for free.

There are some guidelines that need to be followed, in order to avoid transplant shock, allow your herbs to thrive in the garden. There is more to it than just pushing a seedling into the dirt.

What Can Go Wrong?

All plants, from herb to flower, hate to be shocked. They need time to become acclimated to their new surroundings, no matter if they are coming into or out of the garden. A shocked plant will wilt, become sun burnt and die, no matter how rich the soil or optimal the growing conditions.

How To Avoid Transplant Shock

To avoid transplant shock, give your herbs the time they need to become used to the move. About a week before you are moving them from indoors to the garden, place them outside, but in a sheltered location. Take them back inside during the nighttime.

By the end of the week, you can safely leave them outside all night long, but be sure to water them at least once a day – more than likely you will be watering even more often if they are in small cell pots.

Now Can I Plant Them?

Finally, your plants are truly ready to be planted outside. Try to choose a day that is neither too hot or cold, avoid a scorching hot day, and never plant in the rain. The best sort of day is one that is calm and warm, later in the day so the soil is warm but the sun is not directly overhead.

Water the hole before you place the herb into it. Also, be sure your potted herb is moist and not rootbound. Make a hole the size of the root and insert the plant. Fill the rest of the hole with soil and press around the base to be sure the herb has made contact completely with the ground. Water again and then mulch.

 

 

Transplanting Potted Herbs To The Garden

Transplanting Potted Herbs To The Garden

How To Transplant Herbs From Nursery Pots To The Garden

By , About.com

Spring is the time to get out and visit garden shops and nurseries. Take along your garden wish list (you have one, don’t you?), and start selecting the best looking plants you can.

Once you do get your plants home, it will be time to transplant them into the garden. Here are some tips for transplanting potted herbs, in order to keep your plants looking fresh and growing well. Potted herbs come in many sizes, from tiny 3 inch pots to 1 gallon and even 2 gallon sizes. No matter what size you buy, look for plants that are not too dry in the pot. Their leaves should be lush and no shriveled or have dead areas on them. Looking at the bottom of the pot, there may be fine roots sticking out in numerous places, but avoid larger or extremely heavy number of thick roots coming out the sides and bottom of the pot. This is an indication that your plants have grown too large for that pot, yet have remained in the pot for too long (often called Pot or Root bound). Once you trim off the excess roots, it may be too much of a shock for the overgrown plant, resulting in its death or stunted growth.

When you are ready to actually transplant, soak your potted herb in water. This helps the plant to come out of the container more easily, helps keep the soil intact-protecting the roots, and ensures that when you do the final watering with the plant in the ground, it is thoroughly wet through the entire root ball as well as the surrounding soil.

Take a look at the root ball before placing in the ground. If the roots are packed together, gently loosen them and spread them apart (I call this teasing the roots), allowing them to grow in a outward, instead of circular pattern. For more aggressive teasing of the roots, it is often suggested that you cut into the root ball with a sharp knife in several spots. For herbs, this hasn’t been my experience, but it is a valid recommendation in the gardening industry.

Be certain to work on one herb plant at a time. Avoid removing a number of herbs from their pots at the same time, thinking it will speed up your transplanting. The herb roots and soil need to be protected from sunlight and air as much as possible. You may end up with stunted plants that were damaged from the 30 minutes their roots lay exposed as you worked on another plant.

Your hole should be twice the diameter as your potted plant, and deep enough that the herb will be planted in its new spot at the same level. Avoid planting too deeply, since this can cause fungal damage resulting in the plant’s demise. I like to moisten the hole before transplanting, to ensure that the top water will be absorbed more readily. Spread out the roots that you have loosened, and place the herb in the dampened hole. Refill the hole with soil and then firmly press the herb plant into place. Your plant will shift once watered, and it may end up lifting out of the ground, if it is not firmly in place.

Water the new transplanted herb well, trying to avoid soaking the leaves if possible. This will help reduce the chance of mildew and disease, as well as sun damage if transplanting during a hot, sunny day.

Place at least 2 inches of mulch around the base of the transplanted herb, leaving a little space right next to the stem. This helps protect the stem from mildew as well, and any critters that like to hide in the mulch to nibble your herbs, will not have an inviting location to move in. Moisten the mulch once it is in place, and you are done!

 

Spring is Here, When To Start Herbs From Seeds

When To Start Herbs From Seed

Planting Date For Herb Seeds

By , About.com

Starting herbs from seed is probably the most frugal way to begin gardening. It is also a great way to try out many herbs that would be too costly to buy as plants. For the same price as one herb seedling, you can often purchase multiple seed packets.

The important thing to remember when starting herbs from seed is when you should actually germinate them. Here is a list of common herbs, and how many weeks before or after the last frost date you should be planting them.

Starting Herb Seeds Indoors

How Many Weeks Before Last Frost To Start Seeds
Basil 6 to 8 wks before last frost
Borage Direct seed after last frost
Chives 8 wks before last frost
Cilantro Direct seed after last frost
Dill Direct seed after last frost
Fennel 4 to 6 wks before last frost
Lemon Balm 6 to 10 wks before last frost
Oregano 6 to 10 wks before last frost
Rosemary 8 to 10 wks before last frost
Sage 6 to 10 wks before last frost
Thyme 6 to 10 wks before last frost