Herb of the Day for July 28th is Allspice

Herb of the Day

Allspice

 


Allspice is used as a paste to soothe and relieve toothache, as well as a mouthwash to freshen the breath. The rind contains the most active medicinal components and is considered to be stimulant in action, particularly the aroma. The tea has antiseptic properties (due to the eugenol content in the berries) and is used primarily as a digestive aid for flatulence, intestinal gas and indigestion. The tea is also used as an appetite stimulant, and as a carminative. Both the tea and a poultice are used for rheumatism and neuralgia. Allspice lowers blood sugar (useful in diabetes) and improves protein absorption. The leaves are used in the bath for varicose veins, gout, and edema. The eugenol content is said to promote digestive enzymes in the body.

Magickal uses: Allspice encourages healing and is used in mixtures to ask for money and good fortune. Also used in determination and healing spells

Properties: Aromatic, carminative, stimulant

Growth: Allspice is harvested from a tree that is native to Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. Allspice is the dried berry of the pimento, an evergreen tree growing to 40 feet in height. It bears opposite, leathery, oblong to oblong-lancelet leaves whose pinnately arranged veins show prominently on the underside. Small white flowers grow in many-flowered cymes in the upper leaf axils from June to August. The fruit is a fleshy, sweet berry which is purplish-black when ripe.

Poultice: Boil berries and make a thick paste. Spread on a soft clean cloth. The cloth can also be dipped in warm tea and used as hot pack                                                

Pimento water: Combine 5 parts crushed berries with 200 parts water and distill down to half the original volume. A dose is from 1-2 fluid ounces.                                                                                     

Oil: A dose is from 2-5 drops. For flatulence, take 2 or 3 drops on sugar                                                    

Powder: A dose is from 10-30 grains
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for June 22nd is Allspice

Herb of the Day

Allspice

Allspice is used as a paste to soothe and relieve toothache, as well as a mouthwash to freshen the
breath. The rind contains the most active medicinal components and is considered to be stimulant in
action, particularly the aroma. The tea has antiseptic properties (due to the eugenol content in the berries) and is used primarily as a digestive aid for flatulence, intestinal gas and indigestion. The tea is also used as an appetite stimulant, and as a carminative. Both the tea and a poultice are used for rheumatism and neuralgia.

Allspice lowers blood sugar (useful in diabetes) and improves protein absorption. The leaves are used in the bath for varicose veins, gout, and edema. The eugenol content is said to promote digestive enzymes in the body.

Magickal uses: Allspice encourages healing and is used in mixtures to ask for money and good fortune. Also used in determination and healing spells

Properties: Aromatic, carminative, stimulant

Growth: Allspice is harvested from a tree that is native to Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. Allspice is the dried berry of the pimento, an evergreen tree growing to 40 feet in height. It bears opposite, leathery, oblong to oblong-lancelet leaves whose pinnately arranged veins show prominently on the underside. Small white flowers grow in many-flowered cymes in the upper leaf axils from June to August. The fruit is a fleshy, sweet berry which is purplish-black when ripe.

Poultice: Boil berries and make a thick paste. Spread on a soft clean cloth. The cloth can also be dipped in warm tea and used as hot pack

Pimento water: Combine 5 parts crushed berries with 200 parts water and distill down to half the original volume. A dose is from 1-2 fluid ounces.

Oil: A dose is from 2-5 drops. For flatulence, take 2 or 3 drops on sugar

Powder: A dose is from 10-30 grains

 

 

Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

Herb of the Day for November 21 – Marshmallow

Herb of the Day

MARSHMALLOW (Althaea officinalis)

 

To Grow:

No directions to grow.

 

Uses:

The root is used primarily for digestive problems, inflammations of the digestive tract and on the skin. The leaves are used for the lungs and urinary system. The leaf can also be used for bronchitis, respiratory catarrh, and irritating coughs. Externally, the root is indicated in varicose veins, ulcers, abscesses and boils.

 

Parts used:

Roots and leaves. Collect the leaves in summer after flowering and dig up the root in late fall. Clean the root of root fibers and cork and dry immediately.

 

Decoction:

Put 1 tsp. of chopped root into 1 cup of water and boil gently for 10-15 minutes. Drink three times a day.

 

Infusion:

Pour 1 cup of boiling water onto 1-2 tsp. of the dried leaves and leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Drink three times a day.

Tincture:

Take 1-4 ml of the tincture three times a day.

 

This herb can be used as a compress also.

A Little Humor – Fashion No-Nos

Fashion No-Nos

 

As we all get older in the Pagan Community, it is easy to get confused about how we should present ourselves. We’re unsure as we try to be nice and harmonize with the fashions that younger members of our community have adopted.

So I’ve made a sincere study of the situation and here are the results. Despite what you may have seen on the streets or at Pagan gatherings, the following combinations do not go together and thus should be avoided:

  1. A eyebrow piercing and bifocals
  2. Pony tails and bald spots
  3. A pierced tongue and dentures
  4. Ankle bracelets and corn pads
  5. Nipple jewelry and a gall bladder surgery scar
  6. Midriff shirts and a midriff bulge
  7. Tattoos and liver spots or varicose veins
  8. Belly-button piercings and old pregnancy stretch marks
  9. Skyclad and Depends.

Please keep these basic guidelines foremost in your mind when you shop.

 

Turok’s Cabana