Calendar of the Moon for September 9

Calendar of the Moon

9 Coll/Metageitnion

Taliesin’s Day

Color: Sky-Blue
Element: Air
Altar: Upon cloth of sky-blue set a chalice of wine, a cup of honey, a ring of keys, a single stone, and many blue candles.
Offerings: Words that you have written yourself.
Daily Meal: Any food transformed to look like something else, such as a subtlety.

Invocation to Taliesin

Hail, Greatest of Bards!
You who were once Gwion Bach,
A wandering child with no home and no luck,
You who minded the Cauldron of Cerridwen
And stole from it three drops of wisdom,
You who heard the language of birds
And fled from the Goddess’s wrath,
You who were hare and fish and otter,
You who were a bird and a single grain of corn,
You who were seized by Her sharp eyes
And devoured by Her questing beak,
You who grew to fullness again in Her belly
And were birthed forth a second time,
You who were cast into the sea and blown forth
Upon the shore of a far land,
You whose words bedazzled the throned ones,
You whose curse turns men to stone,
You whose song confounds and enlightens,
You who are the Power of Words
Cascading over our ears and our minds,
Infuse us with the Spirit of Inspiration
And may our own words gleam
With the treasure more precious than gold.

(One who has been chosen to do the work of the ritual pours the honey into the wine cup and stirs it, and takes it about to each one present, bidding them drink and saying, “May thy tongue flow with honey.” Each drinks, and the rest is poured out as libation. As this is the day of the God of Bards, one should be brought in from outside the house to sing or speak to all the folk present. They should be feasted as the reliquary of Taliesin, and given honor. Many books should be read tonight.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Calendar of the Moon for August 9

Calendar of the Moon

9 Coll/Metageitnion

Taliesin’s Day

Color: Sky-Blue
Element: Air
Altar: Upon cloth of sky-blue set a chalice of wine, a cup of honey, a ring of keys, a single stone, and many blue candles.
Offerings: Words that you have written yourself.
Daily Meal: Any food transformed to look like something else, such as a subtlety.

Invocation to Taliesin

Hail, Greatest of Bards!
You who were once Gwion Bach,
A wandering child with no home and no luck,
You who minded the Cauldron of Cerridwen
And stole from it three drops of wisdom,
You who heard the language of birds
And fled from the Goddess’s wrath,
You who were hare and fish and otter,
You who were a bird and a single grain of corn,
You who were seized by Her sharp eyes
And devoured by Her questing beak,
You who grew to fullness again in Her belly
And were birthed forth a second time,
You who were cast into the sea and blown forth
Upon the shore of a far land,
You whose words bedazzled the throned ones,
You whose curse turns men to stone,
You whose song confounds and enlightens,
You who are the Power of Words
Cascading over our ears and our minds,
Infuse us with the Spirit of Inspiration
And may our own words gleam
With the treasure more precious than gold.

(One who has been chosen to do the work of the ritual pours the honey into the wine cup and stirs it, and takes it about to each one present, bidding them drink and saying, “May thy tongue flow with honey.” Each drinks, and the rest is poured out as libation. As this is the day of the God of Bards, one should be brought in from outside the house to sing or speak to all the folk present. They should be feasted as the reliquary of Taliesin, and given honor. Many books should be read tonight.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Goddess Of The Month

DEMETER

Goddess of grain and agriculture, pure Nourisher of youth and the green earth, health-giving cycle of life and death, and preserver of both marital fertility and the Sacred Law.

In Greek mythology, Demeter (Greek: “mother-earth” or possibly “distribution-mother” from the noun of the Indo-European mother-earth) is the goddess of grain and agriculture, the pure nourisher of youth and the green earth, the health-giving cycle of life and death, and preserver of both marital fertility and the sacred law. She is invoked as the “bringer of seasons” in the Homeric hymn, a subtle sign that she was worshiped long before the Olympians arrived. The Homeric Hymn to Demeter has been dated to sometime around the seventh century B.C.E. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries, which also predate the Olympian pantheon. The Roman equivalent is Ceres, from whom the word “cereal” is derived.

Demeter is easily confused with Gaia or Rhea, and with Cybele. The goddess’ epithets reveal the span of her functions in Greek life. Demeter and Kore (“the maiden”) are usually invoked as to theo (‘”The Two Goddesses”), and they appear in that form in Linear B graffiti at Mycenaean Pylos in pre-classical times. A connection with the goddess-cults of Minoan Crete is quite possible.

According to the Athenian rhetorician Isocrates, the greatest gifts that Demeter gave were cereal, which set humans apart from wild animals, and the mysteries, which give humankind higher hopes in this life and the next.

The Eleusinian Mysteries

Without a doubt, the most important role of Demeter was as a goddess of the Elusinian mystery religion. In this capacity, her primary function was to provide the cultic adherents with hope for eternal life (or a pleasant afterlife). Though little is known of the specifics of worship, it appears that it involved a hidden knowledge (gnosis) being shared by the participants:

The object of the [mystery] is to place the [participant] in a peculiarly close and privileged relation with the divinity or the deified spirit…. all of the members of the city, gens or household could freely join in the cult, if they were in the ordinary condition or ritualistic cleanliness; and the sacrifice that the priest performed for the state might be repeated by the individual, if he chose to do so, for his own purposes at his own house-altar. Both in the public and in the mystic service a sacrifice of some sort was requisite, and as far as we can see the religious conception of the sacrifice might be the same in both. But in the former the sacrifice with the prayer was the chief act in the ceremony, in the latter it was something besides the sacrifice that was of the essence of the rite; something was shown to the eyes of the initiated, something was done: thus the mystery[.]

These rites are one of the most compelling enigmas in human religious history, as the vow of secrecy that all participants were obliged to take has remained largely unbroken—meaning that many elements of these practices have been lost to the mists of time.

Demeter and Poseidon

Demeter and Poseidon’s names are linked in the earliest scratched notes in Linear B found at Mycenaean Pylos, where they appear as PO-SE-DA-WO-NE and DA-MA-TE in the context of sacralized lot-casting. The ‘DA‘ element in each of their names is seemingly connected to an Proto-Indo-European root relating to distribution of land and honors (compare Latin dare “to give”). Poseidon (his name seems to signify “consort of the distributor”) once pursued Demeter, in her archaic form as a mare-goddess. She resisted the sea king’s advances, but she could not disguise her divinity among the horses of King Onkios. Poseidon became a stallion and “covered” (read: violated) her. Demeter was literally furious (“Demeter Erinys”) at the assault, but washed away her anger in the River Ladon (“Demeter Lousia”). She bore to Poseidon a daughter, whose name could not be uttered outside the Eleusinian Mysteries, and a steed named Arion, with a black mane. In Arcadia, Demeter was worshiped as a horse-headed deity into historical times:

The second mountain, Mt. Elaios, is about 30 stades from Phigaleia, and has a cave sacred to Demeter Melaine [“Black”]… the Phigalians say, they accounted the cave sacred to Demeter, and set up a wooden image in it. The image was made in the following fashion: it was seated on a rock, and was like a woman in all respects save the head. She had the head and hair of a horse, and serpents and other beasts grew out of her head. Her chiton reached right to her feet, and she held a dolphin in one hand, a dove in the other. Why they made the xoanon like this should be clear to any intelligent man who is versed in tradition. They say they named her Black because the goddess wore black clothing. However, they cannot remember who made this xoanon or how it caught fire; but when it was destroyed the Phigalians gave no new image to the goddess and largely neglected her festivals and sacrifices, until finally barrenness fell upon the land.

Demeter, Persephone and the Eleusinian Mysteries

The central myth of Demeter, which is at the heart of the Eleusinian Mysteries, is her relationship with Persephone, her daughter through a dalliance with Zeus. In the tale, Persephone becomes the unwilling consort of Hades (Roman Pluto, the underworld god of wealth) and is taken from her mother’s side into her new spouse’s dusky kingdom. Demeter, distraught over the loss of her precious daughter, devoted the entirety of her time and attention to seeking her, which had the consequence of halting the progression of seasons. During her search, she had many additional adventures, though none of them were sufficient to distract her from her maternal concerns. Eventually, the situation on Earth grew so dire that Zeus found it necessary to intercede directly, imploring his brother to return Persephone to her mother. Before she was released, however, Hades tricked her into eating six pomegranate seeds, which forced her to return to his realm for six months each year. When Demeter and her daughter were together, the earth flourished with vegetation. But for six months each year, when Persephone returned to the underworld, the earth once again became a barren realm. This myth, in addition to providing an aetiological explanation for the progression of the seasons, also explain the connection between Demeter/Persephone and the Eleusinian Mysteries (which were centered around the achievement of eternal life).

Demeter’s stay at Eleusis

While Demeter was searching for her daughter Persephone, she found it expedient to adopt the guise of an old woman (Doso). In this form, she received a hospitable welcome from Celeus, the king of Eleusis in Attica (and also Phytalus). He asked her to nurse Demophon and Triptolemus, his sons by Metanira.

As a gift to Celeus (in thanks for his hospitality), Demeter planned to make Demophon as a god, which was achieved by coating and anointing him with Ambrosia, breathing gently upon him while holding him in her arms and bosom, and by burning away his mortal spirit in the family hearth every night. Unfortunately, Demeter was unable to complete the ritual because one night Metanira (the child’s mother) walked in and saw her son in the fire and screamed in fright. This angered the fertility goddess, who lamented that foolish mortals did not understand the power of her ritual.

Instead of making Demophon immortal, Demeter chose instead to repay her host’s generosity by teaching Triptolemus the art of agriculture. From him, the rest of Greece learned to plant and reap crops.

Portrayals of Demeter

  • Demeter is usually portrayed on a chariot, is frequently associated with images of the harvest, including flowers, fruit, and grain. She was also sometimes pictured with Persephone.
  • Demeter is not generally portrayed with a consort, though the exception is Iasion, the youth of Crete who lay with the goddess in a thrice-ploughed field and was sacrificed afterwards.
  • Demeter placed Aethon, the god of famine, in Erysichthon’s gut, making him permanently famished. This was a punishment for cutting down trees in a sacred grove.

Reference:

New World Encyclopedia

Deity of the Day for July 12th is Taliesin (Welsh)

Deity of the Day

Taliesin (Welsh)

A sun deity reincarnated as Taliesin. While tending Ceridwen’s cauldron Gwion Bach savoured 3 drops of inspiration intended for Afagddu, in her rage the sow chased him until in the form of a black hen she swallowed Gwion who had transformed himself into an ear of corn, once she gave birth he was cast adrift to be found by Elphin who named him Taliesin meaning radiant brow. He is identified as a 6th century bard and associated with both Merlin and Amergin. Like Merlin the sun God spent a period of madness in the woods, often he would boast of his poetic and magical skills. Taliesin appears regularly in the Arthurian legends sailing with him to recover the hallows of Britain from Annwn and accompanying Merlin with the wounded Arthur to the Isle of the Blessed. Prince of Song; Chief of the Bards of the West; a poet. Patron of Druids, Bards, and minstrels; a shape-shifter. Writing, poetry, wisdom, wizards, Bards, music, knowledge, magic.

Deity of the Day for May 23rd is TALIESIN

Deity of the Day

 

TALIESIN: Clever Wizardy God.

Do you remember the witchy Goddess CERIDWEN and her cauldron of knowledge, and her servant lad GWION-BACH? Well this is him after he got thrown into the sea. He was clever enough to get himself caught in a fish trap and thereby rescued.

Delighted with his cleverness, he decided to re-name himself TALIESIN or ‘Shining Brow’. He went on to become Wizard, Bard and Prophet — now there’s clever.

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