Dragon’s Blood

Dragon’s Blood

Several tales tell of the magickal uses of a dragon’s organs and blood. In European lore, the blood was said to make a person invulnerable to stab wounds if they bathed in it, able to understand the speech of birds and animals if they drank it. One of Bothvar’s companions, in the Danish Hrolf’s Saga, ate a dragon’s heart and became extremely brave and strong. Eating the tongue gave eloquence and the ability to win any argument. The liver cured certain diseases, as did various other parts.

Medieval medicine and magick mention the use of dragon’s blood many times. Since dragons are not going to willingly give up their blood, magicians had to turn to other sources. There were said to be several sources of this material, other than from an actual dragon. The “bloodstone” hematite, an ore rich in iron, and the mineral cinnabar, a compound of mercury, were both called forms of dragon’s blood. However, the most widely used “dragon’s blood” was a gum resin. It was said that trees which originally grew from actual spilled dragon’s blood produced a reddish-brown sap of great magickal value. This species of tree is still called Dracaena draco by botanists. Incisions were made in the bark and sap collected as it congealed into resin. Most of these trees are found in the East Indies, souther Arabia, and the Canary Islands. Dragon’s blood resin is still known and used in magickal procedures today.

“Dancing with Dragons”

D. J. Conway