Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days A Year for February 4th – King of Frost Day

Butterfly Wolf
February 4

King of Frost Day

Prior to World War I, a fair was held on this day in London to honor the King of Frost. All the townspeople would gather on the Thames River, normally frozen over at this time, and petition the King of Frost to bring forth Spring. The festival died out during the war.

Along the Welsh border people continue to celebrate this day by gathering snowdrops, sometimes called Candlemas Bells. These tiny bright flowers are tied into bundles and used to purify the hearth and home.

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Veterans Day, The History & Observances

Veteran's Day Comments

Veterans Day, The History  & Observances

 

Veterans Day is an official United States public holiday, observed annually on November 11, that honors military veterans, that is, persons who served in the United States Armed Forces. It coincides with other holidays, including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, celebrated in other countries that mark the anniversary of the end of World War I; major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect. The United States previously observed Armistice Day. The U.S. holiday was renamed Veterans Day in 1954.

Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who gave their lives and those who perished while in service.

History of Veterans Day

U.S. President Woodrow Wilson first proclaimed Armistice Day for November 11, 1919. In proclaiming the holiday, he said

“To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations.”

The United States Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, requesting that President Calvin Coolidge issue another proclamation to observe November 11 with appropriate ceremonies.[2] A Congressional Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U.S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday: “a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day’.”

In 1945, World War II veteran Raymond Weeks from Birmingham, Alabama, had the idea to expand Armistice Day to celebrate all veterans, not just those who died in World War I. Weeks led a delegation to Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, who supported the idea of National Veterans Day. Weeks led the first national celebration in 1947 in Alabama and annually until his death in 1985. President Reagan honored Weeks at the White House with the Presidential Citizenship Medal in 1982 as the driving force for the national holiday. Elizabeth Dole, who prepared the briefing for President Reagan, determined Weeks as the “Father of Veterans Day.”

U.S. Representative Ed Rees from Emporia, Kansas, presented a bill establishing the holiday through Congress. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, also from Kansas, signed the bill into law on May 26, 1954. It had been eight and a half years since Weeks held his first Armistice Day celebration for all veterans.

Congress amended the bill on June 1, 1954, replacing “Armistice” with “Veterans,” and it has been known as Veterans Day since.

The National Veterans Award was also created in 1954. Congressman Rees of Kansas received the first National Veterans Award in Birmingham, Alabama for his support offering legislation to make Veterans Day a federal holiday.

Although originally scheduled for celebration on November 11 of every year, starting in 1971 in accordance with the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October. In 1978, it was moved back to its original celebration on November 11. While the legal holiday remains on November 11, if that date happens to be on a Saturday or Sunday, then organizations that formally observe the holiday will normally be closed on the adjacent Friday or Monday, respectively.

 

Observance

Because it is a federal holiday, some American workers and many students have Veterans Day off from work or school. When Veterans Day falls on a Saturday then either Saturday or the preceding Friday may be designated as the holiday, whereas if it falls on a Sunday it is typically observed on the following Monday. A Society for Human Resource Management poll in 2010 found that 21 percent of employers planned to observe the holiday in 2011.

Non-essential federal government offices are closed. No mail is delivered. All federal workers are paid for the holiday; those who are required to work on the holiday sometimes receive holiday pay for that day in addition to their wages.

In his Armistice Day address to Congress, Wilson was sensitive to the psychological toll of the lean War years: “Hunger does not breed reform; it breeds madness,” he remarked. As Veterans Day and the birthday of the United States Marine Corps (November 10, 1775) are only one day apart, that branch of the Armed Forces customarily observes both occasions as a 96-hour liberty period.

 

Source:
Wikipedia

 

February 4th – King of Frost Day

Witchy Comments & Graphics
February 4th – King of Frost Day

Prior to World War I, a fair was held on this day in London to honor the King of Frost. All the townspeople would gather on the Thames River, normally frozen over at this time, and petition the King of Frost to bring forth Spring. The festival died out during the war.

Along the Welsh border people continue to celebrate this day by gathering snowdrops, sometimes called Candlemas Bells. These bright flowers are tied into bundles and used to purify the hearth and home.

In Honor Of King Frost

Spring House Blessing

To encourage the return of Spring, tie a bunch of snowdrops with green ribbon and hang over the main entrance of your home as you repeat:

Candlemas Bells, snowdrops so white,
Cast away shadows, bring forth the light.
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Daily Motivator for Nov. 9th – Own your good fortun

Own your good fortune

 

 

Don’t wish for a solution to your problems. Be the solution, with the way you live each moment.

If you hold out hope that something will come along to make it all better, you’ll be disappointed. Life gets better when you choose to live it in a positive, intentional, responsible and fulfilling way.

Good fortune is not something that happens to you. Rather, it is the way you can choose to be, no matter what happens.

If your happiness is dependent on factors beyond your control, you’ll never be secure enough in it to enjoy it. If you have to beg for favors, those favors will be of little use to you.

Good fortune is yours when you take full and complete ownership of it. Fulfillment is yours when you make the effort and commitment to live it each day.

Embrace total responsibility, and own your good fortune. All is well because you choose to make it so.

— Ralph Marston

 The Daily Motivator

On This Day……..

On this day…

June 21: June Solstice (17:16 UTC, 2011); International Surfing Day; National Aboriginal Day in Canada

SpaceShipOne

  • 217 BC – Second Punic War: The Carthaginians under Hannibal executed one of the largest military ambushes in history when they overwhelmingly defeated the Romans.
  • 1826 – Greek War of Independence: A combined Egyptian and Ottoman army began their invasion of the Mani Peninsula, but they were initially held off by the Maniots at the fortifications of Vergas.
  • 1919 – Admiral Ludwig von Reuter scuttled the German High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow to prevent the ships from being seized and divided amongst the Allied Powers.
  • 1948 – The Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine, the world’s first stored-program computer, ran its first computer program.
  • 2004 – SpaceShipOne (pictured) completed the first privately funded human spaceflight.