A Little Humor for Your Day – Three Wise Women

Three Wise Women

Do you know what would have happened if it had been Three Wise Women instead of Three Wise Men?

They would have …

Asked directions

Arrived on time (December 25, not January 6!)

Helped deliver the baby (Midwives are also known as “wise women.”)

Cleaned the stable

Made a casserole, and

Brought practical gifts.

Pass this on to the wise women in your life.

Turoks’ Cabana

The Witches Magick for December 25th: Spell To Clear A Home

Witchy Comments~Magickal Graphics~ 

Spell To Clear A Home

For when a household is full of anger, jealousy, depression, etc.  Also can be used when a feeling of negative or evil entity is present in your home. A special note, be sure to leave the windows open while burning.

3  parts  frankincense

3  parts  copal

3  parts  myrrh

1  parts  sandalwood

This one is to burn in your home one a month to purify it after you have cleansed it.

3  parts  frankincense

2  parts  dragon’s blood

1  part  myrrh

1  part  sandalwood

1  part wood betony

½ part  dill seed

A few drops of rose geranium oil

 

Jan 5 – Epiphany Eve

Jan 5 – Epiphany Eve
During the week before Epiphany, Italian children sometimes dress up and go in groups of three, carrying a pole with a golden star on top, and stopping at houses to sing pasquelle, little songs about the coming of the Magi. Sometimes they are given money, but other places they receive gifts of food sausages, bread, eggs, dried figs and wine.

In some small rustic towns, the Nativity is re-enacted on Epiphany Eve with the newest baby in town taking the part of Jesus.

In Friuli, families gather around the hearth to watch the Christmas log burn. For centuries, bonfires have been lit to light the way for the Three Kings. The fires are called pan e vin, bread and wine, or vecja, old one. Boys run through the fields carrying burning brands, jump across the fires, and roll burning wheels down the hill, shouting out the names of their fiancées as a way to announce their engagements (see Epiphany, Jan 6).
The ashes from the bonfires are used to fertilize the earth and assure a good harvest.

Carol Field describes an Epiphany procession in the town of Tarcento which ascends a hill to where a huge bonfire, made of sheaves of corn, brambles of brushwood and pine branches is set up. The fire is lit by the oldest man and ignites firecrackers and fireworks while bells ring in the town. The way the smoke blows foretells the prospects for the coming year: smoke blowing east predicts a year of abundance while smoke blowing west is a bad omen for the crops. People take home embers to fertilize their fields; the embers are magically said to transform into sacks of wheat.

In some places, a straw effigy of the Befana is placed on the fire and burned as a way of getting rid of the old year. Sometimes chestnuts are thrown on the fire and roasted, as a symbol of fertility.

Traditional foods served in Friuli on Epiphany Eve include mulled wine and pinza, a rustic sweet bread, made with corn flour (or sometimes rye and wheat), filled with raisins and pine nuts and figs, spiced with fennel seeds and shaped like a simple round or a Greek epsilon with three arms of equal length. It was once cooked under the embers. It is considered good luck to eat pinze made by seven different families.

Source: Field, Carol, Celebrating Italy, William Morrow 1990