WOTC Extra – Maintaining Cohesion in a Solitary Practice


Gothic Comments

Maintaining Cohesion in a Solitary Practice

 

It can be very lonely working as a solitary Wiccan, no matter what your reasons for the solitary path may be. At times it can seem that there are more obstacles, more frustrations, more opportunities for self-doubt. It’s all too easy to let your practice become lax and unfocused, because there’s no one else to monitor your progress and encourage you when you need it.

Giving yourself smaller daily rituals to engage in—no matter how short and simple they are—keeps you in touch with the gods and your spirituality on a more regular basis. If you touch the Divine on a daily basis, it’s much easier to touch the Divine on the big occasions. The human mind can be remarkably apathetic when it comes to actually stirring ourselves to do something requiring energy and input. Doing a sabbat every six weeks can be a really huge undertaking if you haven’t trained yourself with baby steps in between.

Wicca should never be something you take time out of your regular life to practice. The point of a spiritual path such as Wicca is to incorporate your spiritual practice into your daily life without fuss and drama. Your spirituality should inform your thoughts, opinions, and action in daily life as well as in ritual. Practicing Wicca every moment of the day should make your life more harmonious, not more complicated.

So often a solitary Wiccan becomes more of a philosopher than an active participant in the dance of life. It can be very easy to think about Wicca, and to slowly cease your actual ritual practice. While thinking and reflecting upon your spiritual evolution is essential to further development, maintaining your regular daily practice is paramount. Your ritual practice is your interface with the world beyond.

Solitary Wicca For Life: Complete Guide to Mastering the Craft on Your Own

Arin Murphy-Hiscock

WOTC Extra – Maintaining Cohesion in a Solitary Practice

Maintaining Cohesion in a Solitary Practice

 

It can be very lonely working as a solitary Wiccan, no matter what your reasons for the solitary path may be. At times it can seem that there are more obstacles, more frustrations, more opportunities for self-doubt. It’s all too easy to let your practice become lax and unfocused, because there’s no one else to monitor your progress and encourage you when you need it.

Giving yourself smaller daily rituals to engage in – no matter how short and simple they are—keeps you in touch with the gods and your spirituality on a more regular basis. If you touch the Divine on a daily basis, it’s much easier to touch the Divine on the big occasions. The human mind can be remarkably apathetic when it comes to actually stirring ourselves to do something requiring energy and input. Doing a sabbat every six weeks can be a really huge undertaking if you haven’t trained yourself with baby steps in between.

Wicca should never be something you take time out of your regular life to practice. The point of a spiritual path such as Wicca is to incorporate your spiritual practice into your daily life without fuss and drama. Your spirituality should inform your thoughts, opinions, and action in daily life as well as in ritual. Practicing Wicca every moment of the day should make your life more harmonious, not more complicated.

So often a solitary Wiccan becomes more of a philosopher than an active participant in the dance of life. It can be very easy to think about Wicca, and to slowly cease your actual ritual practice. While thinking and reflecting upon your spiritual evolution is essential to further development, maintaining your regular daily practice is paramount. Your ritual practice is your interface with the world beyond.

 

 

Solitary Wicca For Life: Complete Guide to Mastering the Craft on Your Own

Arin Murphy-Hiscock

 

Let’s Talk Witch – Growing as a Solitary

Let’s Talk Witch – Growing as a Solitary

 
To offer recognition of the divine feminine, to show one’s respect for nature, to have the opportunity for self-improvement and self-self-empowerment, and in appreciation of the decentralized aspects of the religion – these are all common reasons people choose to practice Wicca.

How do we define the goal of Wicca? A common answer is “to serve the gods.” We work with the gods, not for them. And while this is one of the goals of Wicca, it is not the only purpose. You can serve God or gods in any other religion. What makes Wicca unique?

Scott Cunningham titled one of his books Living Wicca, and this wonderful phrase encapsulates what Wicca truly is: Wicca is more than a practice—it’s a way of life. To live Wicca means living in awareness, in peace, in balance, and in harmony. It means living with the goal of every action contributing positively, and every situation teaching you something. It means being mindful, sincere, and true. Living Wicca means recognizing the Divine in everything that surrounds you, and always being able to feel your connection to the gods and the universe.

The true goal of Wicca is to create a way of life that brings you to this state. That state isn’t an end; it is a means by which you can improve your life and maintain the harmony so essential to a better life and a better world.

Solitary Wicca For Life: Complete Guide to Mastering the Craft on Your Own

Arin Murphy-Hiscock

 

The Craft Today

The Craft Today

 

As the world moved into the 60s and 70s, two things started happening to Wicca. The first is that it began spreading beyond the borders of England. This is not to say that American Witches did not exist before the 70s, but the Wiccan movement did start in England and it wasn’t until later that a Witchcraft boom started in America. The second thing that happened is that people started becoming Wiccan without joining covens. They became Solitaries, people who practiced alone.

The Solitary movement began out of necessity. People read the books of Murray, Gardner and others such as Alexander and Crowley and wanted to become Wiccan but were unable to find other around them who felt the same. Realizing that what mattered was their beliefs, these people adopted the Wiccan religion anyway, waiting until a coven became available to them.

After these people started practicing alone, people realized that one shouldn’t feel obligated to practice in a coven. Some people preferred to practice alone and began to do so even when a coven was available to them. This is when the Solitary movement really started, when people began forming their own personal versions of Wiccan spirituality.

An explosion of knowledge occurred after the beginning of the Solitary movement and books about Solitary Wicca hit presses everywhere. Many authors such as Silver RavenWolf, Laurie Cabot, The Campienellis and especially Scott Cunningham and his Wicca… A Guide for the Solitary Practioner, are considered teachers or mentors by people who have never even met them.

The Solitary movement changed the way that Wicca was practiced. If you compare my generation of Witches to the generation before me, you will find that Wiccans my age are far less likely to be involved with a coven, they focus less on the fertility aspect of the religion and more on ecology and they are more theological and less ritual-oriented. It has become a more welcoming, intellectual, morality-based religion and a less exclusive, physical religion. There are many different kinds of Wiccans as a result of these changes, there are still traditionalist Gardnerians and Alexandrians (who, from time to time, tell a Solitary or two that they’re not “real witches”), Dianic Wiccans (who often do not acknowledge the existence of the god and are very feminist-oriented), Wiccans who heavily incorporate Native American beliefs into their spirituality, Celtic Wiccans, “Ecclectic” Solitaries (Solitaries are often called this because we each design our own faith, drawing on many others for ideas), and even Christian Witches–people who believe in Jesus Christ’s divinity but who also revere nature and practice magic. We are very diverse, but we also enjoy a very warm fellowship.

Source:

Empathy’s Mystical Occult Site