Eight Gifts That Do Not Cost A Cent

Eight Gifts That Do Not Cost A Cent

1. THE GIFT OF LISTENING…
But you must REALLY listen. No interrupting, no daydreaming, no planning your response. Just listening.

2. THE GIFT OF AFFECTION…
Be generous with appropriate hugs, kisses, pats on the back and handholds. Let
these small actions demonstrate the love you have for family and friends.

3. THE GIFT OF LAUGHTER…
Clip cartoons. Share articles and funny stories. Your gift will say, “I love to
laugh with you.”

4. THE GIFT OF A WRITTEN NOTE…
It can be a simple “Thanks for the help” note or a full sonnet. A brief,
handwritten note may be remembered for a lifetime, and may even change a life.

5. THE GIFT OF A COMPLIMENT…
A simple and sincere, “You look great in red,” “You did a super job” or “That
was a wonderful meal” can make someone’s day.

6. THE GIFT OF A FAVOR…
Every day, go out of your way to do something kind.

7. THE GIFT OF SOLITUDE…
There are times when we want nothing better than to be left alone. Be sensitive
to those times and give the gift of solitude to others.

8. THE GIFT OF A CHEERFUL DISPOSITION…
The easiest way to feel good is to extend a kind word to someone, really it’s
not that hard to say, Hello or Thank You.

Friends are a very rare jewel, indeed. They make you smile and encourage you to
succeed. They lend an ear, they share a word of praise, and they always want to
open their hearts to us. Show your friends how much you care.

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Daily OM for June 18 – Acceptance as Giving

Allowing Ourselves to Receive

by

Madisyn Taylor

 

By allowing ourselves to receive we are given the gift of seeing through another person’s eyes.

 

Giving and receiving are part of the same cycle, and we each give and receive in our own ways. But we can lose our balance when we try to be too controlling on either side of the cycle. On the receiving end, we may feel that we don’t deserve the effort made if what we gave was easy for us to give. But perhaps there is a different lesson there for us. We may be receiving not only gratitude, but a chance to see the world through the eyes of another. We may be learning that just because we gave easily, it doesn’t diminish its value. Or perhaps the universe is giving us an example to hold close to our hearts, to encourage us on some future day when our own generous act of giving is not met with a visible act of receiving. When we can allow ourselves to receive as well as give, we do our part to keep the channels of abundance open for ourselves and others.

Sometimes we may find ourselves struggling to respond to others’ gifts in the same ways—like responding to an expensive present with something equally expensive, or feeling like we have to throw a dinner party for someone who has thrown one for us. But when these are done out of a sense of obligation, their energy changes from something that shares to something that drains. If this sounds familiar, we can decide next time to allow ourselves to receive with arms, minds and hearts open and simply say thank you.

Accepting a person’s gift is a gift in itself. Sincere appreciation for their acknowledgement and their effort joins our energy with theirs in the cycle of giving and receiving, and nurtures all involved. If ever we find we are still having difficulty, we can decide to allow ourselves to be conduits for gratitude and accept on behalf of a loving, giving universe.

 

DailyOM 

And Father’s Day This Month – Father’s Day gift ideas for grown-ups

What to give to Dad when you’ve moved beyond the construction paper stage of your life.

By Stephanie Rogers
 
Thanking Dad for all he’s done for you doesn’t have to stop at a greeting card and a gift-wrapped tie. But coming up with fresh, unique ideas for Father’s Day gifts can be hard, especially when you’ve outgrown homemade construction paper cards. Instead of focusing on expensive material gifts or worrying about how to outdo your siblings, think about fun ways that you can surprise your father or spend time with him, even if you don’t live close enough for a visit. Here are 10 fun Father’s Day activitiesand gift ideas for grown children.

 
1. Treat him to his favorite things. If you live near your Dad and can spend the day with him, taking him out to enjoy his favorite activity is hands-down the best way to spend Father’s Day. Whether you just tag along on a fishing trip or organize an all-day outing of picnics and paintball, having you there with him will make it more special.
 
2. Give him a new experience. Maybe your father has always wanted to go to a music festival or a wine-tasting tour. Perhaps he’s been harboring a secret desire to learn how to paint or to visit a nearby town. Talk to him before Father’s Day arrives and try to glean some inside info that will help you craft a plan of action. We tend to focus on childhood memories when we think of our parents, but we should never stop making new ones.
 
3. Take a spa day. A gift certificate to a spa is traditionally more of a Mother’s Day gift, but who says men don’t want to be pampered? There’s nothing quite like a massage for sore muscles, or a nice soak in a mineral tub. He could even get an old-fashioned professional shave. Group relaxation time is great for bonding, too.
 
4. Do all of his chores. If your father is too busy to take the day off and spend time with you or to relax at home, help him eliminate some of his chores. Arrange to have the lawn mowed, or to have somebody else take care of his errands. Swing by and do all of the things around the house that take up the most of his time. At the very least, he’ll be able to kick back for a day — and that can be priceless.
 
5. Send him a video card. Live too far away to visit? Record a video greeting. This is especially fun if you can get together with your siblings, or if you have children who’d like to participate. Recount a funny story from your childhood, or just send a sincere message of love and gratitude.
 
6. Organize a video chat. If you can’t get home and a telephone call just isn’t enough, plan to meet via Apple FaceTime, Skype or video conferencing software. Few Father’s Day activities are as rewarding as a simple chat, and it’s nice to see each other’s faces.
 
7. Create a custom photo album. If you’ve got the time, going through old photographs to choose your favorite memories of your father and put them in a special album can be very rewarding. If you want to keep the originals, scan them and them use an online photo service like Shutterfly.com to design and print a custom photo book.
 
8. Create a montage of home videos. Many of us have drawers full of old VHS tapes or even film reels taken when we were kids. Among all of the long, boring clips of dance recitals and Christmas mornings are bound to be some funny and touching gems. If you’re tech-literate, you can likely learn how to transfer these moments onto a DVD or digital medium, or you can take it all to a video editing company.
 
9. Put together a personalized basket of goodies. Does Dad really need another generic gift basket full of stale crackers and salted meats? Give the standard Father’s Day gift basket a little more thought. Purchase an empty basket and fill it with things your Dad likes — specific foods, wine, movies, gift cards and small objects that will make him smile.
 
10. Try your hand at something creative. So maybe you’re not an artist, and you’re long beyond the age when a clay handprint is an acceptable Father’s Day gift. But something made with your own hands is just as meaningful now as it was when you were 10. Doodle, paint, sculpt or sew. If it results in a horrific mess, all the better — it will get a laugh.