Dog-gone of the Day for February 22nd

Figi, the Dog of the Day
Name: Figi
Age: Three years old
Gender: Male Breed: Bichon Frise
Home: Malvern, Arkansas, USA
Figi is a rescued Bichon Frise who is about three years old. He lives in Malvern, Arkansas, and Figi is special because he is my best friend. He is my furry clown. He is the four legged man of my dreams . He is a rescue dog who rescued me. I was lonely and he makes me laugh. Figi is always full of kisses and happy to greet you.His personality is wonderful. In general, he is a tame relaxed pooch! He maxed his temperament test to volunteer. He is a volunteer for pet therapy. Figi dresses up and wears clothes everywhere we go.

As for tricks, besides the standard ones, he knows two uncommon ones: “hide!” If you are carrying a sack with him inside of it; tell him to hide, he goes to the bottom so no one knows he is there. And “Look for fleas:” he will lay across a pillow with his legs wide open for you to look for fleas. He is very dependent on me and I on him!

About his name, his rescue group, Care of Arkansas, said he was named Newton. I didn’t like it so it was between Sir Isaac and Fig. I know I was never going to call a dog Sir Isaac so I came up with Fig Newton but he is called Figi

Astronomy Picture of the Day for February 3rd

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2012 February 3
See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

Inside the Eagle Nebula
Credit: Far-infrared: ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE/Hill, Motte, HOBYS Key Programme Consortium;
X-ray: ESA/XMM-Newton/EPIC/XMM-Newton-SOC/Boulanger 

Explanation: In 1995, a now famous picture from the Hubble Space Telescope featured Pillars of Creation, star forming columns of cold gas and dust light-years long inside M16, the Eagle Nebula. This remarkable false-color composite image revisits the nearby stellar nursery with image data from the orbiting Herschel Space Observatory and XMM-Newton telescopes. Herschel’s far infrared detectors record the emission from the region’s cold dust directly, including the famous pillars and other structures near the center of the scene. Toward the other extreme of the electromagnetic spectrum, XMM-Newton’s X-ray vision reveals the massive, hot stars of the nebula’s embedded star cluster. Hidden from Hubble’s view at optical wavelengths, the massive stars have a profound effect, sculpting and transforming the natal gas and dust structures with their energetic winds and radiation. In fact, the massive stars are short lived and astronomers have found evidence in the image data pointing to the remnant of a supernova explosion with an apparent age of 6,000 years. If true, the expanding shock waves would have destroyed the visible structures, including the famous pillars. But because the Eagle Nebula is some 6,500 light-years distant, their destruction won’t be witnessed for hundreds of years.