Understanding Pagan Holidays – Mabon


Mabon Comments & Graphics

“The Fall Equinox, often called Michaelmas, is the last pagan holiday of the year and occurs somewhere around September 21st or so. This is a thanksgiving feast and signals the beginning of the ‘Hunting Season’, for deer and other large game, in many parts of Europe and North America. Thus, it is dedicated to the Hunting and Fishing deities and the deities of Plenty, in thankfulness for benefits received and hoped for. Outdoor picnics in the woods are a popular tradition in those areas where the weather is still good at this time of year. It is, also, known as Mabon, Second Harvest Festival, Wine Harvest, Feast of Avalon, Alben Elfed, and Cornucopia.   This is the time of the year when the god’s power weakens toward his death as the goddess reaches her full maturity as the Crone. It is considered the end of the harvest and a time of gathering in for the forth coming winter. It is a family oriented period during which pagan families draw together and reflect on the value of home and hearth.”

–   Understanding Pagan Holidays

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – May Day

Beltane Comments & Graphics

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year

May Day

 

Nature if often hidden; sometimes overcome; seldom extinguished.

—Sir Francis Bacon

Common in Europe and North America, May Day is celebrated ebrated by the crowning of the May Queen; dancing around the maypole; and mumming from house to house carrying blossoms soms and soliciting gifts of food. Most of the activities that take place on May Day symbolize Spring, relating human fertility tility to crop fertility and rebirth. In the past it was common for young people to pair up, often by lot, and then gather in the woods all May Eve night.

In English folklore, May Day, Bringing in The May, and Going-a-Maying refers to the practice of going out into the countryside tryside to gather flowers and greenery, much of which was used to adorn the May Queen. Bringing in the May remained a staple tradition throughout most of the 16th century, before it was banned by the Protestant reform-fundamentalists who took moral outrage at the unchaperoned activities of the young people. May Day was banned, along with many other traditional customs in the Commonwealth period, but returned after the Restoration.

Today, many of the old customs still prevail, such as woodland land weddings and the gathering of morning dew for skin renewal. newal. Horse racing, parades, and dancing around the maypole have made a comeback, as have garland parties and mumming.

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – May Day

Beltane Comments & Graphics

May Day

“Nature is often hidden; sometimes overcome; seldom extinguished.”

–Sir Francis Bacon

 

Common in Europe and North America, May Day is celebrated by the crowning of the May Queen; dancing around the maypole; and mumming from house to house carrying blossoms and soliciting gifts of food. Most of the activities that take place on May Day symbolize Spring, relating human fertility to crop fertility and rebirth. In the past it was common for young people to pair up, often by lot, and then gather in the woods all May Eve night.

In English folklore, May Day, Bringing in the May, and Going-A-Maying refers to the practice of going out into the countryside to gather flowers and greenery, much of which was used to adorn the May Queen. Bringing in the May remained a staple tradition throughout most of the 16th century, before it was banned by the Protestant reform-fundamentalists who took moral outrage at the unchaperoned activities of the young people. May Day was banned along with other traditional customs in the Commonwealth period, but returned after the Restoration.

Today, many of the old customs still prevail, such as woodland weddings and the gathering of morning dew for skin renewal. Horse racing, parades, and dancing around the maypole have made a comeback as have garland parties and mumming.