August 7 – Daily Feast

August 7 – Daily Feast

The path through the woods has a light layer of scarlet leaves that have fallen early from the woodbine. Crickets are chirping the coming of a new season – and the sassy blue jay, tla yv ga, agrees. Touching the earth is a lovely feeling that once again we find our beginnings. Whether we walk of plant or plow, it is a place created for us, a place to stand with bare feet to feel comfort spread quietly through us. The pulse of the earth slows our own and tranquilizes confusion. Seeing the ga lv lo I, sky, in its limitless depths stirs us to imagine, to stretch our awareness to know how much beauty is provided for us. It helps us to see that mean things can only last as long as we allow them. Nothing can hem us in when we know the freedom of spirit.

~ I was born on the prairies where the wind blew free and there was nothing to break the light of the sun. I was born where there were no enclosures…. ~

GERONIMO

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

July 20 – Daily Feast

July 20 – Daily Feast

The hours were longer when we were children. Summer was a time of sunlight, bare feet, and shade trees. We fished in a creek with a crooked pole and feasted on potatoes and onions cooked over an open fire, which the Cherokee calls a tsi la. It was a good time, and we expected everything to be good. There was time to daydream – or hide out in a secret place and be quiet. Now we have less time and more responsibility – or have we let fear steal our joy? If we let it, it will tell us we can’t remember details, we hear less, our vision is blurred and we are afraid of what we see and read. Fear is a contaminate that dulls our senses. But it can’t affect us when we turn around and renew and restore our minds. The creek and the sunperch are still there to help.

~ We sang songs that carried in their melodies all the sounds of nature – the running of waters, the sighing of winds, and the calls of the animals. Teach your children….. ~

AMERICAN INDIAN

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler