GARNET (SPESSARTINE)

GARNET (SPESSARTINE)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION:  Spessartine Garnets are from a group of very
closely related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Spessartine
variety is Mn3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from brownish red
to hyacinth-red.  The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and 7-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Spessartine occurs with albite and muscovite in granite
pegmatites and with quartz and riebeckite in blue schist or regional
metamorphic rocks..

OCCURENCE: Large corroded crystals of Spessartine have come from the
Rutherford No. 2 Mine, Amelia, Amelia Co., Virginia; crystals up to 1″
in diameter have been found in several pegmatites in the Ramona
District, San Diego Co., California; sharp, dark-red, well-formed
crystals occur in cavities in rhyolite near Ely, White Pine C., Nevada;
and brilliant crystals of Spessartine have been found with topaz at Ruby
Mt., near Nathrop, Chaffee Co., Colorado. Gem material comes from the
gem gravels of Sri Lanka and Burma. It is also found in Brazil and
Madagascar.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: The gem variety of Spessartine Garnet is uncommon.
It tends to be midway between spessartine and almandine in composition.
The “aurora red”, orange-red or orange-pink color is typical. It has
good transparency and considerable luster. It is normally given a mixed,
round, or oval cut. The weight does not normally exceed a few carats.
Gems of about 10 carats are extremely rare and usually of an atypical,
rather dark, unattactive color.

NAME: Spessartine is named after an occurrence in the spessart district,
Bavaria, Germany.

LEGEND and LORE: In the 13th century garnets were thought to repel
insect stings. A magical treatise, “The Book of Wings”, dating from the
thirteenth century says “The well-formed image of a lion, if engraved on
a garnet, will protect and preserve honors and health, cures the wearer
of all diseases, brings him honors, and guards him from all perils in
traveling.”

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Spessartine is normally considered to be red-orange
to orange-pink. Thus it links the “will” with the “desire”. It is a good
stone to use when casting a spell for your “heart’s desire”, especially
if it is of the orange-pink” variety.
HEALING: The orange garnets are linked to the root and the belly chakra.
They are beneficial in instances of infertility, dealing with reproduc-
tive organs. Mentally, it inspires confidence in personal creativity and
self-worth.

                      ——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Other scientific information may be from “Simon & Schuester’s Guide
to Gems and Precious Stones”.

3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.

4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.

5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s
Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from “ccrystal Wisdom,
Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones” by Dolfyn.

7. More legends and lore may come from “Stone Power” by Dorothee L.
Mella.

8. Healing information is from “The Women’s Book of Healing”, by Diane
Stein.

9. Additional healing information may be from “The Occult and Curative
Powers of Precious Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

Crystal of the Day for October 4th is Azurite

AZURITE

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Azurite is a basic copper carbonate. The chemistry is Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2. It varies from a rather dark blue thru “azure” blue. The streak is blue and the hardness ranges from 3-1/2 to 4.

ENVIRONMENT: Azurite is a secondary copper mineral and develops in the zone of alteration in all types of hydro-thermal replacement deposits, where it commonly occurs with malachite, limonite, and chalcopyrite.

OCCURRENCE: The copper deposits at Tsumeb, South-West Africa, have yielded some of the finest Azurite crystals in the world. The copper deposits in Arizona and Utah that yielded many fine specimens of Malachite also yielded outstanding specimens of Azurite. Fine Azurite crystals have also been found in the San Carlos Mine, Mazapil, Zacatecas, Mexico.

NAME: The name is from the characteristic azure-blue color of the mineral.

LEGEND and LORE: It is said that the priests and priestesses of ancient Egypt used this stone to enhance their spiritual consciousness. Edgar Cayce spoke of Azurite helping him attain a meditative state more easily. This mineral is associated with Sagittarius.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Azurite is associated with divination. When you are practicing precognition, hold a piece in your hand. This is a stone that likes to be touched…and touching it will help to release it’s energies.

HEALING: This stone is said to restructure molecules, revitalize the brain, rebuild gray matter and aid in developing embryonic babies in the womb.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I usually include Azurite in layouts that are for the purpose of increasing divination, or Third-Eye abilities. It is also useful at the Third Eye Chakra for making sense out of a very emotional situation. Very often, the Azurite found in the Southwestern part of the U.S. is mixed with Malachite. This results in a beautiful blue stone with small green marks on it. When cut and polished in a spherical shape, these remind one of a planet. They are soothing to look at and hold.

NOTES: Azurite is an ore of copper and a minor ornamental stone.

——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) “The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals”.

2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

3. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

4. Other material may be from “The Crystal Handbook” by Kevin Sullivan.

5. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by Tandika Star.

Gemstone of the Day for August 21 is CORAL

Coral

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: CaCo3, or calcium carbonate in the form of calcite,
is the main constituent of calcareous corals; minor constituents are MgCo3, or
magnesium carbonate and proteinaceous organic substances, which act as
binding agents. At 2.5 to 4, the hardness is slightly higher than that of
calcite. The skeletons of corals vary in color: from bright to dark red,
slightly orange-red, pink and white.

ENVIRONMENT: In all cases, coral consists of the branching skeletons of
animals which live in colonies planted on the seabed at depths varying from tens
to hundreds of meters. They are typical of warmish to very warm seas.
OCCURENCE: The most famous of these organisms is Corallium rubrum, which
lives in the waters of the Mediterranean and, despite its name, provides not
only red, but orange, pink, and white coral. Similar to this are Corallium
elatius, C. japonicum, and C. secundum, which mainly live off the coasts of
Japan, China, Indochina, the Philippines, and other archipelagos of the Indian
and Pacific Oceans. Coral colonies occupy large areas especially in the Pacific,
but also near the coast of South Africa, in the Red Sea, and to the east of
Australia.  These latter colonies, however, consist of madrepore, which has
little in common with the corals used as ornaments.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Most of the coral used since antiquity as an
ornamental material comes from the calcareous skeletons of colonies of marine
organisms of the phylum Cnidaria, order Corgonacea, genus Corallium. Corals
take a good polish. They also have a certain degree of elasticity and can be
heated and bent into bangles. Thin branches were and still are polished,
pierced, and threaded, unaltered, into necklaces. Larger pieces are cut into
spherical or faceted necklace beads, pear shapes for pendant jewelry, or
cabochons. It is also used for carved pieces and small figurines, in both
oriental and western art styles. The most highly prized varieties of coral are
those that are a uniform, strong bright red.

NAME: The name is derived from the Latin [corallium,] related to the Greek
[korallion].

LEGEND and LORE: The oldest known findings of red coral date from the
Mesopotam-ian civilization, i.e. from about 3000 BC. For centuries, this was the
coral par excellence, and at the time of Pliny the Elder it was apparently much
appreciated in India, even more than in Europe. Red coral has traditionally been
used as a protection from the “evil eye” and as a cure for sterility.  One of
the Greek names for Coral was Gorgeia, from the tradition that blood dripped
from the Head of Medea, which Perseus had deposited on some branches near the
seashore; which blood, becoming hard, was taken by the Sea Nymphs, and
planted in the sea. (8)

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Coral is associated with Venus, Isis and Water. It has
been used as a form of protective magic for children for hundreds of years. 
Cunningham recommends it as a luck-attractor for living areas. Sailors use it as
a protection from bad weather while at sea. Red-orange coral is one of the four
element gemstones of the Pueblo Indians. It is one of the four colors used for
the directions in the Hopi/Zuni Road of Life. Coral is considered a
representative of the warm energy of the Sun, and the southern direction.

HEALING: Coral’s healing properties are mostly associated with Women, young
children and the elderly. For women it is said to increase fertility and
regulate menstruation. For young children, it is recommended to ease teething
and to prevent epilepsy. For the elderly, it is used as a cure for arthritis.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I use coral at the lower Chakras for “Women’s
Healing.” In particular, I will use it for disorders relating to female
reproductive organs.  I also use it magically, to represent female fertility. I
have used it with some success for arthritis, but only for women. This is one of
the stones that I “reserve” for female/feminine use. (I use Carnelian as the
“male” counterpart.)  I have not had an opportunity to try it for a young child.

——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from)
“Simon & Schuster’s Guide to Gems and Precious Stones”.

2. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.

3. Other Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.

4. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s Encyclopedia
of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

5. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A
Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

6. Some of the healing information may come from “A Journey Through the
Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

7. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks,
by <grin> Tandika Star.

8. Some occult lore is from “The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious Stones”
by William T. Fernie, M.D.