Summer Invocation

Summer Invocation

by Trish Telesco

Fireflies and summer sun
in circles round
we become as one.

Singing songs at magick’s hour
we bring the winds
and timeless powers.

Turning inward, hand in hand
we dance the hearth
to heal the land.

Standing silent, beneath the sky
we catch the fire
from out God’s eye.

Swaying breathless, beside the sea
we call the Goddess
so mote it be!

(This can be used as a chant, part of a spiral dance, or to invoke quarters.)

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Midsummer

Midsummer

by JT

Midsummer —
Longest day
Shortest night
Longest light
Shortest dark
The world within
Echoes the world without
Lush foliage, leaves unfurled
Soft springy grass dotted with
Brightly colored flowers peeping through
The earth is green and bright
With warm sunny days
Clear velvety blue skies
Gentle cool breezes
Nature in glory
Our hopes blossom
Creativity flowers
With the season
The seeds of the fruit
Our desires will bear
Can be seen
On the stems
Of our dreams

Summer Solstice

Summer Solstice

by Rhiannon Cotter

Summer Solstice, the longest day, represents a turning point from Spring to Summer during which the Sun God directs the ripening and blossoming of the grain and fruit. Here in the heat of the Summer, the crops are transformed as are our actions, thoughts and plans. All things are tempered by the heat of the Sun. Blossoming and ripening of our works are manifested, or they shrivel and die in the heat. All the while, sexual energy is growing. The Sun God impregnates the Earth Goddess in a sweet “petit mort”—as the cup is to the Goddess, so too is the athame to the God.

Midsummer Incense#2

Midsummer Incense#2

Recipes by Scott Cunningham

3 parts Frankincense
2 parts Benzoin
1 part Dragon’s Blood
1 part Thyme
1 part Rosemary
1 pinch Vervain
a few drops Red Wine

(The above recipe for “Midsummer Incense” is quoted directly from Scott Cunningham’s book “The Complete Book of Incenses, Oils & Brews”, page 80, Llewellyn Publications, 1989/1992.)

Summer Solstice Ritual Potpourri

Summer Solstice Ritual Potpourri

Recipe by Gerina Dunwich

45 drops lemon or lavender oil
1 cup oak moss
2 cups dried lavender
2 cups dried wisteria
2 cups dried verbena

Mix the lemon or lavender oil with the oak moss, and then add the remaining ingredients. Stir the potpourri well and store in a tightly covered ceramic or glass container.

(The above recipe for “Summer Solstice Ritual Potpourri” is quoted directly from Gerina Dunwich’s book “The Wicca Spellbook: A Witch’s Collection of Wiccan Spells, Potions and Recipes”, page 162, A Citadel Press Book, Carol Publishing Group, 1994/1995)

Midsummer Ritual Mead

Midsummer Ritual Mead

Recipe by Gerina Dunwich

2-1/2 gallons water (preferably fresh rainwater blessed by a Wiccan priestess or priest)
1 cup meadowsweet herb
1 cup woodruff sprigs
1 cup heather flowers
3 cloves
1 cup honey
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 cup barley malt
1 oz. brewer’s yeast

Pour the water into a large cauldron or kettle. Bring to a boil and add the meadowsweet herb, woodruff sprigs, heather flowers, and cloves. Boil for one hour and the add the honey, brown sugar, and barley malt. Stir thirteen times in a clockwise direction and then remove from heat.

Strain through a cheesecloth and allow the mead to cool to room temperature. Stir in the brewer’s yeast. Cover with a clean towel and let it stand for one day and one night. Strain again, bottle, and then store in a cool place until ready to serve.

Midsummer Ritual Mead is an ideal drink to serve at Summer Solstice Sabbats, as well as during all Cakes and Ale Ceremonies and Esbats.

(The above recipe for “Midsummer Ritual Mead” is quoted directly from Gerina Dunwich’s book “The Wicca Spellbook: A Witch’s Collection of Wiccan Spells, Potions and Recipes”, page 172, A Citadel Press Book, Carol Publishing Group, 1994/1995)