Litha – Summer Solstice

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A Very Beautiful & Blessed Summer Solstice To All Our Brothers & Sisters of the Craft! May The Goddess Shine Her Blessings Upon You!

Litha Blessings

Litha

Life giving power surrounds us
The Goddess will soon give life
Our earth is filled with the promise
of growth
It is a time of joy and celebration
Yet, there is a whisper that dark
will soon come
Light has reached its power
The Sun power begins to wane
Our Oak King is rich in abundance
But soon his brother will reign
The decent begins with the Holly King
Bonfires are alight
We find each other and prepare for the night
None will sleep
We wait for the sunrise
We dance with abundant
Leaping high through flames
The smells of healing herbs fill the air
We prepare for what will come
Our homes prepared for the darkness
As we make our bread we pray that
the Goddess fills our homes
Wheat from our fields changed to grain
Mixed by loving hands
Placed in the fire to cook
Ale, honey cakes and bread fill the pantry
Sprigs of rosemary hand from the rafters
The wheel of life continues…..

—-A Witch’s Prayerbook
JoAnne Spiese

The Summer Solstice

 

 

 

 

 

The Summer Solstice

The longest day of the year is going to brighten up your life

As the Sun enters Cancer each year, it’s the mark of the first day of summer — also known as the Summer Solstice. What makes this day so important? For one thing, on the day of the Summer Solstice the Sun appears to stand still in the sky. The Sun will grace us with his presence and warmth for an extraordinary length of time on this day. As a matter of fact, it’s the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere.

Cancer ushers in the new season

The astronomical reason for this is because it is at this time each year that the Sun stops right over the Tropic of Cancer, which is located at the northernmost point of our planet. After a few days it will backtrack south towards the equator. The solstice occurs on June 21 and astrologically, it coincides with the start of the Cardinal Water sign Cancer.

Cancer is the sign associated with nurturing, mothering, and deep emotional connection as well as family. At the Summer Solstice, we’re reminded that Mother Earth sustains. The Sun’s rays allow Mother Earth to continue to do so. Everyone feels noticeably more vibrant in the summer months thanks to the extra rays of Sun beaming on us. Life is “in our face” at the Summer Solstice. It feels like nothing will ever die because there’s an endless supply of nourishment to our bodies and souls during this time.

 

Part of the Daily Insight Group

Midsummer

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY TOP81

Midsummer

Midsummer, or the longest day of the year, is celebrated on June 21. During this period, the first fruits begin to appear on the trees. Life is easy and good, there is food, and the cold weather is disappearing. The days are warm and long. In myths, this is the time in which the goddess is impregnated by the god, her belly swells, and new life is created in her vicinity. In agrarian societies, this is the time between sowing and reaping – the time in which Mother Earth “swells.”

The accessories used in the rituals include pink roses, oak leaves, and various symbols connected with the sun. The dominant colors are red and green. This is a good festival for personal spells, as well as for those that are done for the sake of society and the universe as a whole.

This time is suitable for festivals. Witches and wizards celebrate with feasts of fruit and vegetables. Even though it is the longest day of the year, it carries with it the awareness that from now on, the days will get shorter, and the winter will ultimately arrive. This is the time of the goddess as a mother, and she is at the peak of her glory.

Day-by-Day Wicca: A complete guide to Wicca from Beliefs and Rituals to Magic and Witchcraft (Astrolog Complete Guides)
Tabatha Jennings

 

Litha Legends and Lore: Myths and Mysteries of the Midsummer Solstice

Happy fathers day
Litha Legends and Lore

Myths and Mysteries of the Midsummer Solstice

Litha, or Midsummer, is a celebration that has been observed for centuries, in one form or another. It is no surprise, then, that there are plenty of myths and legends associated with this time of year!

In England, rural villagers built a big bonfire on Midsummer’s Eve. This was called “setting the watch,” and it was known that the fire would keep evil spirits out of the town. Some farmers would light a fire on their land, and people would wander about, holding torches and lanterns, from one bonfire to another. If you jumped over a bonfire — presumably without lighting your pants on fire — you were guaranteed to have good luck for the coming year.

After your Litha fire has burned out and the ashes gone cold, use them to make a protective amulet. You can do this by carrying them in a small pouch, or kneading them into some soft clay and forming a talisman. In some traditions of Wicca, it is believed that the Midsummer ashes will protect you from misfortune. You can also sow the ashes from your bonfire into your garden, and your crops will be bountiful for the rest of the summer growing season.

It is believed in parts of England that if you stay up all night on Midsummer’s Eve, sitting in the middle of a stone circle, you will see the Fae. But be careful – carry a bit of rue in your pocket to keep them from harassing you, or turn your jacket inside out to confuse them. If you have to escape the Fae, follow a ley line, and it will lead you to safety.

Residents of some areas of Ireland say that if you have something you wish to happen, you “give it to the pebble.” Carry a stone in your hand as you circle the Litha bonfire, and whisper your request to the stone — “heal my mother” or “help me be more courageous”, for example. After your third turn around the fire, toss the stone into the flames.

Astrologically, the sun is entering Cancer, which is a water sign. Midsummer is not only a time of fire magic, but of water as well. Now is a good time to work magic involving sacred streams and holy wells. If you visit one, be sure to go just before sunrise on Litha, and approach the water from the east, with the rising sun. Circle the well or spring three times, walking deosil, and then make an offering of silver coins or pins.

Sunwheels were used to celebrate Midsummer in some early Pagan cultures. A wheel — or sometimes a really big ball of straw — was lit on fire and rolled down a hill into a river. The burned remnants were taken to the local temple and put on display. In Wales, it was believed that if the fire went out before the wheel hit the water, a good crop was guaranteed for the season.

In Egypt, the Midsummer season was associated with the flooding of the Nile River delta. In South America, paper boats are filled with flowers, and then set on fire. They are then sailed down the river, carrying prayers to the gods. In some traditions of modern Paganism, you can get rid of problems by writing them on a piece of paper and dropping them into a moving body of water on Litha.

William Shakespeare associated Midsummer with witchcraft in at least three of his plays. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Macbeth, and The Tempest all contain references to magic on the night of the summer solstice.
 

Source

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article originally posted on & owned by About.com

Litha Legends and Lore

Litha Legends and Lore

Myths and Mysteries of the Midsummer Solstice

Litha, or Midsummer, is a celebration that has been observed for centuries, in one form or another. It is no surprise, then, that there are plenty of myths and legends associated with this time of year!

  • In England, rural villagers built a big bonfire on Midsummer’s Eve. This was called “setting the watch,” and it was known that the fire would keep evil spirits out of the town. Some farmers would light a fire on their land, and people would wander about, holding torches and lanterns, from one bonfire to another. If you jumped over a bonfire — presumably without lighting your pants on fire — you were guaranteed to have good luck for the coming year.
  • After your Litha fire has burned out and the ashes gone cold, use them to make a protective amulet. You can do this by carrying them in a small pouch, or kneading them into some soft clay and forming a talisman. In some traditions of Wicca, it is believed that the Midsummer ashes will protect you from misfortune. You can also sow the ashes from your bonfire into your garden, and your crops will be bountiful for the rest of the summer growing season
  • It is believed in parts of England that if you stay up all night on Midsummer’s Eve, sitting in the middle of a stone circle, you will see the Fae. But be careful – carry a bit of rue in your pocket to keep them from harassing you, or turn your jacket inside out to confuse them. If you have to escape the Fae, follow a ley line, and it will lead you to safety.
  • Residents of some areas of Ireland say that if you have something you wish to happen, you “give it to the pebble.” Carry a stone in your hand as you circle the Litha bonfire, and whisper your request to the stone — “heal my mother” or “help me be more courageous”, for example. After your third turn around the fire, toss the stone into the flames.
  • Astrologically, the sun is entering Cancer, which is a water sign. Midsummer is not only a time of fire magic, but of water as well. Now is a good time to work magic involving sacred streams and holy wells. If you visit one, be sure to go just before sunrise on Litha, and approach the water from the east, with the rising sun. Circle the well or spring three times, walking deosil, and then make an offering of silver coins or pins.
  • Sunwheels were used to celebrate Midsummer in some early Pagan cultures. A wheel — or sometimes a really big ball of straw — was lit on fire and rolled down a hill into a river. The burned remnants were taken to the local temple and put on display. In Wales, it was believed that if the fire went out before the wheel hit the water, a good crop was guaranteed for the season.
  • In Egypt, the Midsummer season was associated with the flooding of the Nile River delta. In South America, paper boats are filled with flowers, and then set on fire. They are then sailed down the river, carrying prayers to the gods. In some traditions of modern Paganism, you can get rid of problems by writing them on a piece of paper and dropping them into a moving body of water on Litha.
  • William Shakespeare associated Midsummer with witchcraft in at least three of his plays. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Macbeth, and The Tempest all contain references to magic on the night of the summer solstice.

 

Author

 

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

Litha Prayer to the Sun

Litha is the season of the summer solstice, and the longest day of the year. This means that the very next day, the nights will begin getting longer incrementally as we move towards Yule, the winter solstice. Celebrate the sun while there’s time, and let its warm energy and powerful rays envelope you.

 

Litha Prayer to the Sun

The sun is high above us
shining down upon the land and sea,
making things grow and bloom.
Great and powerful sun,
we honor you this day
and thank you for your gifts.
Ra, Helios, Sol Invictus, Aten, Svarog,
you are known by many names.
You are the light over the crops,
the heat that warms the earth,
the hope that springs eternal,
the bringer of life.
We welcome you, and we honor you this day,
celebrating your light,
as we begin our journey once more
into the darkness.

Author

 

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

A Prayer for the Beach

The beach is a magical place, indeed. If you’re lucky enough to visit one this summer, remember that it’s a spot where all four of the elements converge: the water of the ocean crashes upon the shore. The sand is warm and dry beneath your feet. The wind blows in off the coast, and the fire of the sun blazes down upon you. It’s sort of a combo platter of all sorts of magical goodness, right there waiting for you.

Why not take advantage of it? Try to find a secluded spot where you can be alone for a few moments, and offer up this prayer to the waves.

A Prayer for the Beach

O mother ocean, welcome me in your arms,
bathe me in your waves,
and keep me safe
so that I may return to land once more.
Your tides move with the pull of the moon,
as do my own cycles.
I am drawn to you,
and honor you under the sun’s fiery gaze.

Author

 

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

A Garden Prayer for Litha

A Garden Prayer for Litha

 

If you’re planting a garden this year, you may already have plants in the ground by the time Litha rolls around. Don’t worry, you can still offer up this prayer to help them flourish! Go out to your garden on a sunny day, stand barefoot in the soil, and feel the magical energy of the earth. If you’re a container gardener, that’s okay, place your hands around each pot as you say this prayer to bless your flowers, fruit, and vegetables!

 

Small plants, leaves and buds,
growing in the soil.
O fiery sun, may your rays of
light and warmth
bless us with abundance,
and allow these plants to blossom
with life.

Author

 

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

Summer Lucky Days

Summer Lucky Days

by Patricia Telesco

July lucky days: 3, 12, 15, 18, 21, 31…

July is the month of prosperity, resolution to difficult situations, and legal successes. As the Sun warms the air, let it warm your heart; if necessary, ask the universe for insight. Focus on these dates when planning authorized activities, magic for financial stability, or to bring peace and accord.

August lucky days: 6, 11, 14, 18, 24, 30…

Release worries and burdens to a Summer wind and let them move away! These are excellent days for contemplation, peacefulness, and meditation in natural settings. Reclaim your center and be at rest.

September lucky days: 1, 8, 16, 17, 25, 27…

A month of changeable weather and joyous adventures. These are the best days to consider travel, puttering around the home, a picnic with loved ones, or asking for a promotion. The Sun is slowly starting to wane, so our outdoor pleasures should be filled to overflowing.

(The above “Summer Lucky Days” is quoted directly from Llewellyn’s 1994 Magical Almanac, page 170, Llewellyn Worldwide Publications, 1993.)