“THINK on THESE THINGS”

“THINK on THESE THINGS”
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Human dignity is that silent something in us that keeps us from falling below the level where others look down on us to make light of our very existence. None of us exists who cannot sense to some degree the feeling that others hold for us. It may create in us a “show them” attitude that takes us through life more successfully, but it will more likely destroy our desire to be anything more than what is expected of us.

It is an appalling thing to see others impose their superiority upon the human dignity of those whose literacy may not be equal to their own. Only profound ignorance could convince anyone they have the right to see and idly judge another’s intelligence, or to insult the dignity of any human being. The little silent people who have not yet discovered within themselves the abilities they need to lift themselves, still have the right and dignity of being human. A small amount of respect and direction might start them on the road to better things, though it might be all uphill. At least if they know it is all uphill they may work harder and reach a place where they can look back at those with lofty ideas about themselves, standing forever stagnant, and feel more compassion than they could ever have felt.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

“THINK on THESE THINGS”

“THINK on THESE THINGS”
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Don’t allow life to mean too much. Keep it light and shallow; spend as much time as possible scoffing at those things meaningful to others; forget the decency and patience in their attitudes.

And look with overbearing revenge to make them pay for what they believe….laugh at their efforts…..call attention to their imperfections…..and don’t forget to learn how to live alone…..if not in body, then in spirit. And then don’t take the blame for a desert-island soul. It is of one’s own making. But remember, oh so well, that life does not stand still while we search for someone to blame for our isolation.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

“THINK on THESE THINGS”

“THINK on THESE THINGS”
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Hardly any of us are without some jealousy. We like to think of ourselves above that painful emotion, because such a monstrous feeling is a destructive thing. But if we have not yet felt a normal amount of it, it is because we have yet to doubt something we love very much.

Margaret, Queen of Navarre, and sister of Francis 1, King of France in the fifteenth century, wrote the following words:

“Love may exist without jealously, although this is rare; but jealousy may exist without love, and that is common; for jealousy can feed on that which is bitter, not less than on that which is sweet, and is sustained by pride as often as by affection.”

Jealousy can rear its head when logic is giving you the facts, and throw the whole thing into chaos. But confidence is the enemy of jealousy. Confidence, trust, and faith are all strong parts of a nature where jealousy does not rule.

And jealousy, even in moderation, can introduce us to a serious problem with ourselves, if we let it grow out of proportion. It breeds rejection while maturity and understanding keep us safely within the bounds of permissiveness rather than possessiveness.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

September 7 – Daily Feast

September 7 – Daily Feast

 

Many weak excuses come to mind to give us a right to self-pity – we don’t feel well, we haven’t slept in a week, or we simply don’t know what others expect of us. All these things can be true and all have a devastating effect, but we could have said we are in the midst of a pity celebration. Mind games tell us we need an excuse to keep from being overwhelmed with obligations. We don’t need any excuse to say we are simply not up to the challenges at this time. If people want to be offended it is their privilege, but right now self honesty and rest are more important.

~ I have no father or mother; I am alone in the world. No one cares for Cochise. ~

COCHISE – APACHE

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days, Volume II’ by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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September 2 – Daily Feast

September 2 – Daily Feast

 

Everything has a reason. We may have to wait a while to understand, because much of what we see is a puzzle with all its pieces strewn about. The whole thing is there but in our present condition we do not comprehend the first thing about fitting the right pieces together. It is going to take some time. Maybe our dullness is necessary to keep us from making foolish moves. It is better to stand and let life creep back in and our blood to flow normally before we begin again. We still do not know the reason for something but we can handle the time better and we recover our sense more quickly.

~ We are all Seminoles here together. We want no long talk; we wish to have it short and good. ~

CHIEF JOHN HICKS – SEMINOLE, 1829

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days, Volume II’ by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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“Think on These Things”

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Others don’t seem to be interested in our excuses – they merely want performances. Alibis for lack of service, for lack of ability to give a full measure of trust make a bad servant. And we are all servants, serving each other in one way or another.

It is an unhappy one who is not depended upon for something. There is great satisfaction in being needed, even to the point of doing more than one is capable of doing.

English divine Sidney Smith once wrote, “Try to make at least one person happy every day, and then in ten years you may have made three thousand, six hundred and fifty persons happy, or brightened a small town by your contribution to the fund of general enjoyment.”

We cannot move a step upon this earth without finding someone to serve. And as we serve each day, we never stop to consider how many we’ve made happy; but it should be very vivid in our minds how many we’ve made unhappy.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

 

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

In this jet age when almost “instant there” is completely accepted, the world has become very small. The days of remaining in one’s own birthplace are near an end, and those who never dreamed of traveling have adjusted themselves to it quite well.

And with shorter distances between us and our neighbors it seems our worlds should find more opportunities for mutual understanding. But we must realize that even though our material worlds may be easily crossed, our thoughts are worlds apart. Until we can bring together a thinking people with the desire to create living conditions that are peaceful and full of kindness, fast travel can waver between good and bad.

A British novelist and poet, George Moore, said, “It is thought, and thought only, that divides right from wrong; it is thought, and thought only that elevates or degrades human deeds and desires.”

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

August 17 – Daily Feast

August 17 – Daily Feast

 
We never really lose anyone. If they were ever a part of our lives, they are always a part of our lives. The important thing is not to regret what has gone before but to take from it the lesson, the experience that was in it for us. Lie is a two-way street, not always sunshine and flowers but a few clouds, a few tears, go with it. It is a complex mixture of many things we are supposed to glean from it. We cannot park by what went wrong, nor can we linger forever by something we might have done right. It is a progressive, moving time filled with new experiences, memories both good and not so good, and many promising hours. It is possible to put our emotions aside and remember joy. But above all, the best is yet to be.

~ The Great Spirit placed me here…..to take good care of the ground and to do each other no harm. ~

YOUNG CHIEF

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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‘THINK on THESE THINGS’

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Cooperation is said to be the essence of success. Without it confusion and chaos are the ruling factors and in harmony the main thought. Cooperation is a result of excellent leadership, the ability to build a team of loyal players who can follow instructions or think for themselves, whichever is for the best of all concerned.

A team is a group with specific parts to play. In all wisdom they know a little about every part, but they play their own positions with precision and efficiency.

Every player cannot be captain, and every person cannot play quarterback. The part may be small, but if it is played with fairness and dignity and to the utmost of ability, then it will be as important to the successful outcomes or results as the biggest job in the team.

The practical view of cooperation is vivid in John Dickinson’s words, “By uniting we stand; by dividing we fall.” We are only as strong as the weakest, only as cooperative as the spirit in which we work.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

“Think on These Things”

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Before we can share with others, we must have something to share. And all of us do have something to give. Not material things, but we can share our peace and our love and our loyalty.

Before we can share with others, there must be others with whom to share. For if we are selfish and self-centered enough, we will never have to worry about sharing anything. We will be alone.

Before we can expect others to share with us, we must be capable of accepting. We must be worthy of others who desire to share with us; we must deserve their love.

Before the two of us can ever find anything in this world of mutual interest, we must have enough concern and enough love to feel a need within to produce something good enough to offer; not only to others, but to ourselves. If we have abused our own nature with thoughts of bitterness, harboring painful experiences, self-condemnation for little progress regardless of circumstances, then we have nothing to offer.

The French philosopher Achille Poincelot once said, “Some people think that all the world should share their misfortunes, though they do not share in the sufferings of anyone else.”

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.