The Herbs Of The Sabbats

The Herbs Of The Sabbats

To be used as decorations on the altar, round the circle, in the home.

Samhain:
Chrysanthemum, wormwood, apples, pears, hazel, thistle, pomegranates, all
grains, harvested fruits and nuts, the pumpkin, corn.

Yule:
Holly, mistletoe, ivy, cedar, bay, juniper, rosemary, pine. Place offerings of
apples, oranges, nutmegs, lemons and whole cinnamon sticks on the Yule tree.

Imbolc:
Snowdrop, rowan, the first flowers of the year.

Eostara:
Daffodil, woodruff, violet, gorse, olive, peony, iris, narcissus, all spring
flowers.

Beltane:
Hawthorn, honeysuckle, St. John’s wort, woodruff, all flowers.

Midsummer:
Mugwort, vervain, chamomile, rose, lily, oak, lavender, ivy, yarrow, fern,
elder, wild thyme, daisy, carnation.

Lughnasadh:
All grains, grapes, heather, blackberries, sloe, crabapples, pears.

Mabon:
Hazel, corn, aspen, acorns, oak sprigs, autumn leaves, wheat stalks, cypress
cones, pine cones, harvest gleanings.

Advertisements

OTHER WAYS OF MARKING OESTARA

OTHER WAYS OF MARKING OESTARA

 

* Celebrate the arrival of spring with flowers. Bring them into your own home and, in keeping with the theme of balance, give them to others. You do not have to spend a lot of money – one or two blooms given for no other reason than ‘spring is here’ can often bring a smile to even the most gloomy face.

* Do a bit of ‘personal housekeeping’. We live in an age where guilt is more often encouraged then pride, where we are encouraged to dwell upon our ‘negative’ points and habits. This is not the way of the Witch. As Witches we must learn to be as honest about our plus points as society would like us to be about our minuses.

Advertising, probably the most pervasive kind of propaganda, encourages us to think
of ourselves as ‘less than perfect’ unless we look and dress like the people in the
adverts and possess all the things that the advertisers would like us to spend money
on. It is worth bearing in mind that if we truly needed these products then there would
be no need to put them into commercials!

However, to return to the ‘personal housekeeping’, write a list of 20 of your plus points,
things you are good at, and 20 minus points, things you would like to improve. Try
not to be influenced by stereotypes – many female Witches include ‘outspoken’ on
their list of negatives, while males will describe the same quality as positive! If you
absolutely must include your physical attributes on the minus list, then make sure
that these are things which you can sensibly expect to change, but don’t fall into the
advertisers’ trap. From the perspective of the Witch it is far more important that you
should come to terms with the person that you are, rather than worry about the way
people see you.

One of the first tasks of the Witch is to understand and accept themselves, with all
their good and bad points, because it is only when you understand yourself that you
will be in a position to understand others, and therein lies a good portion of Witches’
Magic.

Start to learn about some of the plants and herbs which have been traditionally used
as remedies. A basic knowledge of herbs is part of the heritage of the Witch.

Three Types of Ingredients Found In Witches’ Flying Ointment

Three Types of Ingredients Found In Witches’ Flying Ointment

Medieval witches’ flying ointments have three types of ingredients not always exclusive:

*Those with actual vision producing propensity

*Those that are poisonous

*Those that are disgusting

Many herbs components of these salves were highly toxic: a very precise, trained hand was needed to determine exactly how much would provide a shamanic experience, as opposed to how much would kill you. In other words, either those formulas were a lie or whoever successfully used them was a person of skill and knowledge.

Dangerous items(and they are dangerous, do not consider reproducing these formula) used safely could indicate shamanic skill and herb knowledge, if one is inclined to think that way and if one is inclined to respect that skill and knowledge. However, looked at from another perspective, their use could also point to a person’s supernatural ability to withstand poison or perhaps if one is inclined yet another way to indicate the devil’s protection.

Disgusting ingredients are almost inevitably dead babies, typically unbaptized. Information was extracted under torture. It’s very hard to judge how much was genuine information from witnesses and how much was derived from the torturer? Under the circumstances, if the torturer asked whether you used baby fat, would you disagree?

Technically speaking baby fat was only needed for a base. The constant suggestion that it was used also points to early abortion wars and the identification of midwives with witches. Every ointment or salve needs some base for other materials. Fat is merely a carrier for the potent ingredients. Any animal or vegetable fat will serve.

Despite all the pictures of witches literally flying around on broomsticks, a report from 1435 indicates that there was appreciation that the journey was shamanic, not actual: “A woman allegedly rubbed herself with ointment while seated in a large kneading trough. She immediately went to sleep and dreamed of flight However she shook so vigorously that she fell out and injured her head.

What were Witches’ Flying Ointments?

What were Witches’ Flying Ointments?

Allegedly, special ointments and salves, when applied to the body, allowed one to mount a broomstick and fly to witches’ sabbats.

Two theories exist, not mutually exclusive. One is that the witches, if some were really witches, were on shamanic journeys. The other theory is that the ointments provided erotic adventures instead, with the broomstick serving for those lacking more conventional dildos, not a standard household item in medieval Europe. Ointments were applied where the skin is thin and permeable: the wrists or vagina.

Flying ointment formulas revealed under torture have since been tested, and the results from scientific testing indicate that many formulas, when applied topically, will produce the sensation of flight.