7500 years old ancient goddess relic discovered in Israel

Cover picture for the article

During an excavation in Eilat, Israel, archaeologists found an extremely ancient idol. It is believed to represent an important Semitic goddess.

In Eilat, situated in the south of Israel, archaeologists have discovered an idol dating back several thousand years. Carved from a tree trunk, this artefact is believed to be an object designed in honour of Asherah, the goddess who was the wife of the creator god Yahweh, as reported by Arkeonews.

Asherah, a symbol of fertility

According to Geo, before turning to monotheism, the Hebrew people were polytheistic, meaning that they worshipped a multitude of gods. In ancient times, they idolised Asherah, a goddess who is said to have been the mother of 70 other divine entities. She was given various names and functions. Asherah is also known as Ashratum or Baalat and is sometimes associated with the supreme god El or Baal. Her name is also mentioned in the Bible. A symbol of fertility, it is represented as a female figure, a tree or a pole. In Eilat, archaeologists have (re)discovered a 30 cm relic carved from a trunk.

An ancient archaeological site

The Red Sea is definitely rich in artefacts. Just after the Blemmyes Tomb found in Egypt, this relic is another great archaeological find. The site where the relic was found has been excavated by scientists since 1978. According to Arkeonewsit contained 11 simple tombs and 20 burial mounds. The site adds that:

The presence of the juniper trunk clearly shows that the site was reserved for the worship of goddesses, and it is probably the oldest Asherah idol found in the region (it has been carbon-dated to 4540 BC).

This article is translated from Gentside FR.

Fertility Deities of Beltane

I feel t is important to remember Lady Abyss as we count down the days until Beltane so I decided to repost an article by her from 2017.

Fertility Deities of Beltane

 

Beltane is a time of great fertility — for the earth itself, for animals, and of course for people as well. This season has been celebrated by cultures going back thousands of years, in a variety of ways, but nearly all shared the fertility aspect. Typically, this is a Sabbat to celebrate gods of the hunt or of the forest, and goddesses of passion and motherhood, as well as agricultural deities. Here are a list of gods and goddesses that can be honored as part of your tradition’s Beltane rituals.

 

Artemis (Greek): The moon goddess Artemis was associated with the hunt and was seen as a goddess of forests and hillsides. This pastoral connection made her a part of spring celebrations in later periods.

 

Bes (Egyptian): Worshiped in later dynasties, Bes was a household protection god, and watched over mothers and young children. He and his wife, Beset, were paired up in rituals to cure problems with infertility.

 

Bacchus (Roman): Considered the equivalent of Greek god Dionysus, Bacchus was the party god — grapes, wine, and general debauchery were his domain. In March each year, Roman women could attend secret ceremonies called the bacchanalia, and he is associated with sexual free-for-alls and fertility.

 

Cernunnos (Celtic): Cernunnos is a horned god found in Celtic mythology. He is connected with male animals, particularly the stag in rut, and this has led him to be associated with fertility and vegetation. Depictions of Cernunnos are found in many parts of the British Isles and western Europe. He is often portrayed with a beard and wild, shaggy hair — he is, after all, the lord of the forest.

 

Flora (Roman): This goddess of spring and flowers had her own festival, Floralia, which was celebrated every year between April 28 to May 3. Romans dressed in bright robes and floral wreaths, and attended theater performances and outdoor shows. Offerings of milk and honey were made to the goddess.

 

Hera (Greek): This goddess of marriage was the equivalent of the Roman Juno, and took it upon herself to bestow good tidings to new brides. A maiden about to marry could make offerings to Hera, in the hopes that she would bless the marriage with fertility. In her earliest forms, she appears to have been a nature goddess, who presides over wildlife and nurses the young animals which she holds in her arms.

 

Kokopelli (Hopi): This flute-playing, dancing spring god carries unborn children upon his own back, and then passes them out to fertile women. In the Hopi culture, he is part of rites that relate to marriage and childbearing, as well as the reproductive abilities of animals. Often portrayed with rams and stags, symbolic of his fertility, Kokopelli occasionally is seen with his consort, Kokopelmana.

 

Pan (Greek): This agricultural god watched over shepherds and their flocks. He was a rustic sort of god, spending lots of time roaming the woods and pastures, hunting and playing music on his flute. Pan is typically portrayed as having the hindquarters and horns of a goat, similar to a faun. Because of his connection to fields and the forest, he is often honored as a spring fertility god.

 

Priapus (Greek): This fairly minor rural god has one giant claim to fame — his permanently erect and enormous phallus. The son of Aphrodite by Dionysus (or possibly Zeus, depending on the source), Priapus was mostly worshiped in homes rather than in an organized cult. Despite his constant lust, most stories portray him as sexually frustrated, or even impotent. However, in agricultural areas he was still regarded as a god of fertility, and at one point he was considered a protective god, who threatened sexual violence against anyone — male or female — who transgressed the boundaries he guarded.

 

Sheela-na-Gig (Celtic): Although the Sheela-na-Gig is technically the name applied to the carvings of women with exaggerated vulvae that have been found in Ireland and England, there’s a theory that the carvings are representative of a lost pre-Christian goddess. Typically, the Sheela-na-Gig adorns buildings in areas of Ireland that were part of the Anglo-Norman conquests in the 12th century. She is shown as a homely woman with a giant yoni, which is spread wide to accept the seed of the male. Folkloric evidence indicates that the figures are theory that the figures were part of a fertility rite, similar to “birthing stones”, which were used to bring on conception.

Xochiquetzal (Aztec): This fertility goddess was associated with spring, and represented not only flowers but the fruits of life and abundance. She was also the patron goddess of prostitutes and craftsmen.

by Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

 

Flashback 2004 Imbolc

 Imbolc

Celebrate this festival by draping the altar in white and silver. Kepp the entire altar white — white candlesticks, white incense bowls, etc. Represent the Goddess with a figure of a horned cow. If you wear robes in ritual, honor Brigid in her guise as the goddess of the dairy by wearing white. With Neptune lending the glamour to your robes to the Sun this time, as glitter to your robes with sliver and “diamonds.” Let your imagination run wild.

Save snow from the last storm, or use crushed ice, and put it out in bowls on the altar. Scrub clean an old milke bottle or cream jar and fill it with fresh milk; freshly made mozzarella cheese will round out your cakes and ale. Nestle all bowls in the snow.

The planetary energies are particularly favorable this sabbat for working magic for world peace. Place all the candles you’ll be using this year on the altar and start this ritual in the dark — this is, without lights. Add your magic to the returning Sun. Dedicate and consecrate all your candles during this festival of lights, and consecrate your agricultural tools for use in the coming cycle of growth. This is the festival of new beginnings.

Copyright By K. D. Spitzer in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2004 Page 39

Flashback 2002 Imbolc

Imbolc is an important day of purification and initiation; on the Sun’s day, February 2, the energies are very airy. This Sabbat is a good day for coven work, with an emotionally detached masculine Moon and Sun on the Sun’s day.

Dress yourself and your altar in white, while serving white beverages or any dairy food to honor the calving season. Spread the top of a one-pound round Camembert or Bire cheese with raspberry preserves. Cut a circle of puff pastry large enough to cover the cheese, wrap it, tucking the ends of the pastry under. Use scraps to decorate the top with goddess symbols. Brush with beaten egg yolk. Bake at 425 degrees until golden, and serve hot and melting on crackers. During this ritual, bless and dedicate all candles you will need for other ritual work throughout the year. A good way to start the ceremony is to light candles in the darkened room with chanting to encourage the lengthening days.

©️ By K. D. Spitzer Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2002 Page 41

IMPORTANT NOTE for the Southern Hemisphere Imbolc falls on August 1st.

Flashback 2002 Lammas

Lammas is the first of the harvest festivals and this year despite the fiery Sun, it has a strong, sensual feel of cardinal earth. Mars lends a masculine energy to the Sun this week to help with the organizing for this bread festival. Round cornbread as a solar disk is an apt and easy choice for the altar, but if you plan several days ahead, you can sprout a small amount (1/4 cup) of wheat or barely for kitchen witchery. Add this to your other grains to your own bread from scratch; or buy frozen bread dough, thaw, pat into a rectangle, and sprinkle the sprouted grains. Roll up your dough like a jelly roll and place in a greased bread pan into which you have sprinkled Irish oats. You can use a sharp knife to crave goddess symbols into the loaf before baking.

©️ By K. D. Spitzer Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2002 Page 93

41 Greek Gods and Goddesses: Family Tree and Fun Facts

You’re Invited to Olympus Mall Where the Greek Gods Dwell and Sell

Far away on Mount Olympus lives the… Well, the Olympians — the twelve most important Greek dieties.

In ancient times, the Olympians and the rest of their family were an important part of daily Greek culture. Each god and goddess ruled certain realms and also played their part in mythology; fascinating stories that helped ancient Greeks to grasp the world around them, including the weather, religious beliefs, and their own social system.

That being said, even the Olympian gods must earn a living.

Possessing so many powers and abilities, they all agreed that they would make excellent business owners, and so opened a grand mall and invited all the mortals.

Let’s grab a shopping bag and go explore the Greek god family tree!

Table of Contents

Zeus the Mall Manager

Suspect Infidelity? Hera’s Private Eye Business Can Help

Book a Trip at the Atlas Traveling Agency

Find Variety at Apollo’s Flea Market

The Eros Lounge for Lonely Hearts

There’s Even a Wine-Tasting Event

Stay Away From the Security Booth

Rejuvenate With Sleep Therapy to Continue Your Shopping

There’s a Shuttle Service for Tired Shoppers

Ares Runs the Army Surplus Shop

There’s a Creepy Dude on a Boat

Pan’s Pet and Sacrifice Shop

This Family’s Failing Business Sells Air Fresheners

There’s Free Counseling for Disturbed Mortals

This Hardware Shop Has All the Mist You Need

This Paramedic Will Fix Your Bones After Kratos Jumps You

The Mall Has a Mini-Jail Called Tartarus

The Cinema Shows Back-To-Back 3D Horror Movies

The Helios Car Dealership Sells Golden Bowls

The Ghost Tour Has Real Ghosts

Poseidon Runs the Black Market

Please Claim Your Kids at the Lost and Found Tent

Aphrodite’s Kissing Booth

Learn How to Chop Necks at Athena’s Karate Club

Hyperion’s Laser Tag Arena

You Can Buy Bottled Air From Aether

Alastor’s Restaurant Serves All the Revenge You Can Eat

There’s an Old Guy That Sells Answers (But You Probably Won’t Get Them)

Pick a Tour Package at the Extreme Adventure Club

There’s a God in the Mini-Jail

There’s a Celebrity Signing Photos of Himself

Enjoy Free Muffins at the Bingo Hall

You’ll Win Every Race With Nike’s Sports Equipment

The Hypno-Therapist Makes Your Problems Worse

The Water-Girl Might Knock You Out

Hecate’s Hex & Herb Shop 

The Mall’s Casino Doubles as a Human Resources Office

The Archery Range Is Fun (But Deadly If You Upset Artemis) 

The Art Gallery Is Full of Living Things and Violence

Mania Is Too Mad to Have a Business

Get Your Face Peeled by Persephone

Get Your Napalm at the Fire-Starter’s Shop

Thank You for Shopping at the Mount Olympus Mall!

Click here to more of this article from historycooperative.org

When Isis Was Queen

Ancient Egyptian Goddess Isis and God Osiris

At the ancient Egyptian temples of Philae, Nubians gave new life to a vanishing religious tradition.

Hathor.When the Romans conquered Egypt in 30 B.C., the country’s system of temples, which had sustained religious traditions dating back more than 3,000 years, began to slowly wither away. Starved of the funds that pharaohs traditionally supplied to religious institutions, priests lost their vocation and temples fell into disuse throughout the country. The introduction of Christianity in the first century a.d. only hastened this process. But there was one exception to this trend: In the temples on the island of Philae in the Nile River, rites dedicated to the goddess Isis and the god Osiris continued to be celebrated in high style for some 500 years after the Roman conquest. This final flowering of ancient Egyptian religion was only possible because of the piety and support of Egypt’s neighbors to the south, the Nubians.

Philae lies just south of the Nile’s first cataract—one of six rapids along the river—which marked the historical border between ancient Egypt and Nubia, also known as Kush. In this region of Kush, called Lower Nubia, the temple complex at Philae was just one of many that were built on islands in the Nile and along its banks. Throughout the long history of Egypt and Nubia, Lower Nubia was a kind of buffer zone between these two lands and a place…

Information About Some of the Gods and Goddesses

Sun Gods

Cat Gods

Roman Gods and Goddesses

Water Gods and Gods of the Sea

Japanese Gods and Mythology: The Shinto Religion

10 Gods of Death and the Underworld From Around the World

Celtic Gods and Goddesses: Exploring the Pantheon and Mythology of the Ancient Celt

41 Greek Gods and Goddesses: Family Tree and Fun Facts

Norse Gods and Goddesses Pantheon: The Mythology of the Nordic Viking Deities

Ancient Egyptian Gods and Goddesses Pantheon: The Mythology of the Nubian Deities

 

From HistoryCooperative.org – To read the rest of the article about Gods and Goddesses

History Cooperative – Countryside Festivals

Click here to read more about Countryside Festivals

As the Romans saw many natural thigns such as trees, rocks and other matters as possible hosts to spirits or bearers of some other religious significance, then the countryside bustled with spiritual hints by gods, ghosts and spirits. There was also not a thing which wasn’t somehow guarded by a deity.

Read More: Roman gods

There was gods who watched over fields, groves, orchards, vineyards, springs, woods and any other matter. Jupiter for example watched over oak trees which were sacred to him. As country life was inevitably connected to agriculture, which was at the whim of nature, religious life in the country therefore consisted primarily of appeasing he many gods around one, ensuring that they would guard the harvest and be merciful.

As the ancient calendar, before later changes by the Romans, began on waht is now 15 March, the first traditional festival of the country calendar was the liberalia on 17 March. It was held to honour Liber, the god of fertile crops and vineyards. (The liberalia was also the traditional date when a boy could become a man by being given his toga virilis.)

On 15 April came the fordicia in honour of the earth goddess Tellus. For this pregnant cows were slaughtered in sacrifice and in Rome animal fetuses were burnt on altars. The parilia festival which took place the week after the fordicia, saw sheep being herded and forced to jump across burning bales of straw, in order to be purified.

Another festival was that celebrating the goddess Ceres which took place on 19 April. Ceres was especially connected with agriculture, the harvest and, especially, grain. So her festival was no doubt of significance to farmers. There would be a ritual march around the boundaries of the land, the so called lustration, to purify it and to honour the goddess. In the earlier times of Rome the festival of Ceres would see faxes let loose with torches tied to their tails where later the grand arena of the Circus Maximus would stand.

After the festival of Ceres followed the vinalia rustica which was a wine feast to celebrate…

Ancient Roman God Terminus

Terminus

From Pantheon.org – For Sources and References Roman God Terminus

“Border.” A Roman divinity presiding over boundaries and frontiers. His worship is said to have been instituted by Numa who ordered that every one should mark the boundaries of his landed property by stones to be consecrated to Jupiter (Ζεὺς ὅριος), and at which every year sacrifices were to be offered at the festival of the Terminalia.1 These sacred boundaries existed not only in regard to private property, but also in regard to the state itself, the boundary of which was not to be transgressed by any foreign foe. But in later times the latter must have fallen into oblivion, while the termini of private property retained their sacred character even in the days of Dionysius, who states that sacrifices of cakes, meal, and fruit (for it was unlawful to stain the boundary stones with blood), still continued to be offered.

The god Terminus himself appears to have been no other than Jupiter himself, in the capacity of the protector of boundaries.2 The Terminus of the Roman state originally stood between the fifth and sixth milestone on the road towards Laurentum, near a place called Festi, and that ancient/boundary of the Ager Romanus (“the field of Rome“) continued to be revered with the same ceremonies as the boundaries of private estates.3 Another public Terminus stood in the temple of Jupiter in the Capitol, and above it there was an opening in the roof, because no Terminus was allowed to be under cover.4 This is another proof that Terminus was only an attribute of Jupiter, although tradition gave a different reason for this circumstance; for when that temple was to be founded, and it was necessary to exaugurate other sanctuaries standing on the same site, all the gods readily gave way to Jupiter and Juno, but the auguries would not allow the sanctuaries of Terminus and Juventas to be removed. This was taken as an omen that the Roman state would remain ever undiminished and young, and the chapels of the two divinities were inclosed within the walls of the new temple. Here we may ask, what had a Terminus to do on the Capitol, unless he was connected or identical with Jupiter?

Some of the Witchcraft/Magickal Correspondences for Sunday

Witchcraft and/or Magickal correspondences for every day of the week can differ from one web site to another. My aim is to bring you some but definitely not all of the correspondences for different days of the week from three to four websites per day when possible. I suggest you print out the Witchy correspondences to place in your Book of Shadows/Grimoire/or what ever name if any you refer to your personal book or computer file that you keep reference information in for spells, rituals, charms, talismans, etc. As such the Witchcraft/Magickal Correspondence post will no longer have any pictures on it, so you will use less ink when printing them out.

Sunday

Sunday – General Correspondences

From Angelfire.com

Health, success, career, goals, ambition, personal finances, advancement, drama, fun, authority figures, law, fairs, crops, totem animals, volunteer and civic services, promotion, the God, men’s mysteries, children, buying selling, speculating

The Sun naturally rules the first day of the week.

Any type of God or solar-related magick is especially potent this day.

Spells for logic, thought and leadership will have strong results.

Sun Rituals: money, health, friendship related.

Colour: Yellow

Element: Fire.

Number: 6

Sunday – Gods and Goddesses

Angel of Sunday: Archangel Michael

From ask-angels.com – Sunday

Archangel Michael– “Who Is Like God” (Hebrew)

Offers Divine Protection, releases fear, and helps to inspire purpose. Michael works closely with Lightworkers, with individuals who seek to know their Divine Purpose, and promote positive change on the planet. Archangel Michael is one of the easiest Archangels to hear, and he offers direct guidance, and support when called upon.

Sunday – Gem and Stones

From Galleries.com – Sunday

Sunstone

Golden Topaz

From mycrystalaura.com.au

Colours: Gold and Orange.
Metal: Gold.
Crystals: AmberTigers EyeCarnelianSunstoneTopaz, Diamond.

Sunday Herbs

From Spell 8 – Sunday Herbs

Bay leaf, Marigolds, Sunflowers, Cinnamon, Cedar, Lemon, Angelica, Buttercups, Juniper, Marigold, St Johns Wort.

Thursday Witchcraft/Magickal Correspondences

From WitchSwap.com

Thursday

is associated with the planet Jupiter, the planet that rules over expansion and optimism, amplifying attraction work of any kind.

Prosperity and Road Opening spells are two of the most commonly associated with this day.

The corresponding zodiac signs are Capricorn and Pisces. Using the same line of thought as I did with Wednesday’s associations, I also add Sagittarius to the list of signs corresponding with Thursday, because that is the zodiac sign analogous with Jupiter.

Elements that are associated with Thursday include Air and Fire, but arguably Earth could be mentioned as well due to Capricorn being an earth sign.

Although finances are typically associated with Thursday, all spell work relating to matters of success will be fortuitous. Luck, overcoming obstacles (block busting or road opening), legal matters and personal success are all spells with enhanced effectiveness on this day of the week.

Gods/Goddesses: Hera, Juno, Jupiter, Thor, Zeus. If you work with the Ancient Greek or Ancient Roman pantheon, this would be a good day to pay homage to the Queen and King counterparts of both respective systems: Juno and Jupiter (Roman) and Hera and Zeus (Greek).

Angel: Selaphiel

MULTIFAITH CALENDAR – September 2021

Thanks for visiting Sewanee’s Multifaith Calendar! Created as a project of the Interfaith Advisory Council, this resource is meant to help our campus community know about some of the diverse religious and ethical holidays celebrated by members of the Sewanee community. Use it as you plan programming and schedule events, or to learn about the rich religious diversity that exists at Sewanee.

Though we’ve made every effort to be inclusive, this calendar is not exhaustive; we focused primarily on major holidays identified by practitioners of the traditions represented on campus. If we’ve missed something you’d like to see included, or if you see something you’d like to have corrected, please email Cassie Meyer, Director of Dialogue Across Difference Programs.

If you would like to observe an important religious or ethical holiday, but are struggling to find the resources to do so on campus, please email Cassie Meyer, Director of Dialogue Across Difference Programs and the University Chaplain, the Rev. Peter Gray. We want to work with you to help the Mountain feel like a religious and spiritual home for all.

September 2021

9/4-11 Jain: Paryushana, also known as the Festival of Forgiveness, lasts either eight or ten days and is a time of intensive study, reflection, and purification. It culminates with a day focused on confession and asking for forgiveness.

 

9/6-8 Jewish: Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown, and begins the Jewish New Year and the Days of Awe, a period of reflection on the past year and the year to come.

 

9/11 Coptic Orthodox Christian: Nayrouz (Coptic New Year) begins the new year for the Coptic Orthodox Church of Egypt.

 

9/15-16 Jewish: Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) begins at sundown on the 27th and ends at sundown on the 28th. A day of fasting and repentance, Yom Kippur marks the end of the Days of Awe or Days of Repentance, and is the holiest day in Judaism.

 

9/20-27 Jewish: Sukkot, or the Festival of Booths, begins at sundown on 9/20 and goes until 9/27. It is celebrated by the building of sukkot (sing. sukkah; outdoor shelters covered with greenery) as a commemoration of the autumnal harvest.

 

9/20 – 10/6 Hindu: Pitra Paksha is a 16 day holiday where many Hindus observe an all-vegetarian diet while also offering food to those in need.

 

9/21 – Various: Zhongqiu Jie (China), Chuseok (Korea), Tết Trung Thu (Vietnam) or Sampeah Preah Khae (Cambodia) is a harvest festival celebrated in much of East Asia and Southeast Asia. Traditions include viewing the full moon with family, eating moon cakes, reunions, and boat races.

 

9/21- 9/22 Pagan and Wiccan: Modron/Mabon (Autumnal Equinox) begins at sundown; sabbat is observed on the autumnal equinox. It is the first harvest holiday.

 

9/27-28 Muslim: Arba‘een, observed by Shi’a Muslims, begins at sundown and marks the end of the 40-day mourning period following Ashura, the anniversary of the martyrdom of Hussein ibn Ali, grandson of Islam’s prophet Muhammad.

 

9/28-29 Jewish: Simchat Torah marks the end of the annual cycle of Torah readings and the beginning of the new cycle.

Life As The Witch – Recognizing Our Goddess, HEKATE (Hecate)


Hekate: A Modern Implications

These days, Hekate is often still seen as the Goddess of Witchcraft and Dark Magick, a Dark Crone, because of her connection to the line between life and death. Her chthonic roots are attributed to her aspects as a Death Goddess, but in truth she is not solely death aspected. Her nature is one of transformation, and though change can be terrifying and damaging, it can also be beatific. To think of Her only as a chthonic, Underworld Goddess is to ignore part of her nature.

These days we too often see things in terms of diametric, opposites (light/dark, masculine, feminine, God/Goddess, as if the vast universe is written in binary, nothing more than ones and zeros. While these dichotomies play a role in the nature of the universe, they are also simplified depictions. Deity cannot be contained in the use of dichotomy, because deity transcends those terms.

Hekate is neither light nor dark; she is the very scale of graduation, present at the exact point at which one type of gray becomes another, between every gradient and at either end of the spectrum. Each change is her territory, and there are billions of transformations every day.

Hekate’s connection to magic is another aspect of her nature. Through magic we take what is only potential and pull it into reality, imprinting the mundane world with what could be. And this is one of the biggest changes of all, the transformation for which Hekate has always been particularly revered. Magick is transformation, and it’s from this that Hekate’s association with it is.

In invoking Heckate we can learn to accept changes in our lives, both positive and negative, and we can also create change in our own worlds. She aids the completion and manifestation of spells and when called for divinatory purposes she can help to reveal the truth more readily. She can part the Veil, to allow clearer vision or communion with the dead. Hekate is a protector of children, especially when they walk hard paths, but also in the journey into adulthood.

Hekate guards the crossroads, both those that line our physical reality and those that mark our passage through life, through our spirituality, and through the journey that is existence.

Reference:

Excerpt from:”The Transformative Nature of Hekate”

by Marion Sipe

Llewellyn’s 2012 Magical Living Companion

MOTHER EARTH/GAIA/ALL EARTH GODDESS’ EARTH DAY April 22, 2021

ALWAYS TRY TO LEAVE THE PLACES YOU TRAVEL CLEANER THAN WHEN YOU GOT THERE!

The theme of this year’s Earth Day is “Restore or Earth” As Pagans and/or Witches it is our duty to help clean up, plant new life, etc. for the Earth Goddess (Whatever name you may caller by). We are conservationists working at ground level to restore and keep the Earth Goddess clean. This way she can continue providing us with all living things that we make our shelter from the weather from, the clothes we wear, and the food we eat.

Remember to pick up after your dog as their scat has E.coli in it which if enough of it seeps into the ground our water and food sources could be come contaminated. Making our water undrinkable and our food inedible.

Treat her with love and respect

We thank you (insert the Earth Goddess’ name you use) for nourishing all living things that help to protect and nourish our physical bodies.

May we always strive to make you a beautiful and healthy in our every day lives.

These are our words to offer our help. This is our will to make our word rings true.

So Mote It Be ( Use whatever words you end your spellcasting and/or prayers with.)