Friday the 13th

For many people, Friday the 13th is a holiday that carries ominous overtones and is considered unlucky in Western culture. It’s a day which occurs at least once every year and may occur up to 3 times in a calendar year. However, while some people consider the day to be unlucky or even evil, statistical analysis has shown that fewer accidents happen on this day than on any other day. Which is probably due to more people staying home and being extra careful on this day.

History of Friday the 13th

Unfortunately, the history of this day is somewhat obscured by time, so it really isn’t known why it has come to be known as an unlucky day. Throughout much of modern human history, Friday has been considered unlucky and the number 13 has been unlucky, but the combination of the two wasn’t considered especially unlucky together until about the late 19th century or early 20th century.

Since ancient times, Friday has always been a day of bad luck. On Fridays, sailors avoided starting new journeys, seamstresses would avoid needlework on this day and businessmen would avoid writing letters on this day. The superstition that this day was unlucky was so prevalent that farmers would avoid starting their crops on a Friday. However, not every Friday was considered equal. Good Friday was a day that was seen as a day that brought good luck – especially if you were a sailor who just so happened to have made their maiden voyage on Good Friday.

Likewise, the number 13 has been unlucky since ancient times as well. However, it really isn’t known when that superstition began. Some people think that it goes back to the last supper of Jesus Christ. Counting Jesus and his 12 disciples, there were 13 people at the table. This is considered unlucky because the 13th guest,  Judas Iscariot would betray Christ and died by his own hand. This led to the belief that if 13 people sat down to a meal together, one of them would die by the end of the year. The “unluckiness” of the number 13 became extremely popular during the 19th century. During this time, people would avoid having anything to do with this number. So much so, the number was often skipped when numbering hotel rooms and the 13th floor of buildings were often mislabeled as the 14th floor.

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