The Witches “Witchy” Journal for Wednesday, April 4th

Spring Fantasy
The Witches “Witchy” Journal for Wednesday, April 4th

Love Is The Law

Do what thou wilt is the Whole of the Law
The time of The Will
Bursts forth Now, in the Spring
Implacable bud!

 

Let your Love burst forth and blossom freely
Thunder of roses
Unfettered by harsh will
Love willed to be Free

 

To soar with on Her Wings into New Heavens
Over pure New Earths
Love is Will purified
Love is Her own Law!

 

Sun is born again in primitive Light
With Arian Force
In the Spring House of Mars
New Life Exploding

 

From cold Winter’s Icy dark Womb
Gives force to our Wills
Time of re-SOL-ution
We are born again

 

Juices of Spring wash us from Winter Womb
As Spring buds push out
We drop from Her belly
Like damp, new born colts

 

This is the time to re-SOL-ve our new lives
With Nature’s Forces
Supporting and healing
As Old Winter dies

—Author Unknown
Originally published on Pagan Library

 

Wednesday is the day of the Teutonic deity known as Woden or Odin, an aspect of the Allfather, god of knowledge, wisdom, enligtenment, and combat, the parallel of Hermes, the planet Mercury.

The Witches Magick Associated With Wednesday, The Day of Mercury

 

Perfumes: Sweetpea, Lavender, Mastic, Frankincense, Cloves

Incense: Cinnamon, Cinquefoil

Color: Yellow or Grey

Influences: Conjurations, Predictions, Knowledge, Writing, Eloquence

 

Reference:

A Book of Pagan Rituals
Herman Slater

Magickal Days of the Week – Wednesday

Wednesday is named for Woden himself, although the Romans called it dies Mercurii. This is a day associated with the color purple, the planet Mercury, and the metal quicksilver – which is also called mercury. See a pattern here?

When it comes to deities… yes, Mercury! However, there are a few other gods associated with Wednesday, including Odin and Hermes, Athena, and Lugh. Gemstones like adventurine and agate come in handy as well, as do plants such as aspen trees, lilies, lavender and even ferns.

Business and job-related issues, communication, loss and debt, traveling, and journeys are all tied in to Wednesday. This is a good day to do a working to open up lines of communication – especially if your own actions are preventing you from being an effective speaker or listener. Go someplace new or return to an old favorite stomping ground, step up your game, and settle up your accounts.

Reference

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article originally published on & owned by ThoughtCo

 

Wednesday, April 4th

Wednesday is the day of the Teutonic deity known as Wodin or Odin, an aspect of the Allfather, god of knowledge, wisdom, enlightenment and combat, the parallel of Hermes, the planet Mercury.

Deity: Woden

Zodiac Sign: Gemini & Virgo

Planet: Mercury

Tree: Ash

Herb: Cinquefoil

Stone: Emerald & Sardonyx

Animal: Raven & Cat

Element: Air

Color: Red & Blue

Number: 6

Rune: Odal(O)

 

The Celtic Tree Month of Fearn(Alder)(March 18 – April 14)

Runic Half Month of Ehwaz(horse) (March 30 – April 13)

Goddess of the Month of Columbina (March 20 – April 17)

 

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick

The Wicca Book of Days for April 4th

Greetings, Great Mother

April 4th marked the beginning of the Megalensia, or Megalesia, festival in Ancient Rome, which continued until April 10th and was intended to honor the Goddess in her motherly aspect, and specifically in her incarnation as Cybele or Magna Mater (“Great Mother”). Over the course of the festival, an image of the Goddess was paraded through the city streets (and was said to bestow blessings on everything that it passed) to the sound of cymbals, tambourines, and drums. Competitive games – called the Ludi Megalenses – were held at the Circus Maximus; bloody sacrifices were made; and much feasting was done at lavish celebratory banquets.

Make Music

Pay tribute to the all-powerful Goddess today. Follow the noisy precedent established by her worshipers over two thousand years ago and clash some cymbals, shake a tambourine, or bang a drum as you invoke the Great Mother.

 

The Goddess Book of Days for Wednesday, April 4th

In Phrygia and Rome, the day of the Megalesia of Cybele. The meteorite of Cybele was brought to her temple in Rome in 204 B.C. from Anatolia. The arrival of the Goddess was commemo- rated yearly as the Games of the Great Mother. Cybele is also Demeter, Ceres, Gaia, Ishtar, Spider Woman, Rhea, Changing Woman, Rhiannon, Tonantzin, Mawu, Erzulie, Oshun, Astarte, and Ashtoreth.

Source

The Goddess Book of Days
Diane Stein

 

Goddesses Associated With Wednesday, The Day of Wodin

Isis, Demeter, Ceres, Spider Woman, Bona Dea, Oya, Devi-Kali, Hella, Rhiannon, Coatlique, Maman Brigette

Source

The Goddess Book of Days
Diane Stein

Wednesday–The Day of Woden

Woden, or Odin as the Norsemen called him, was the chief of the gods of our ancestors, and corresponds to the Jupiter of the Romans. Also, for reasons which we shall read later, he was similar to Mercury, and his name was given to the Roman Dies Mercurii, day of Mercury, which still survives in the French mercredi.

As in the case of Jupiter and the Titans, Odin led the Northern gods in a gigantic struggle with the giants of ice and frost, and finally overthrew them. With the help of the gods, he then fashioned the world from the body of the chief of the giants. From the flesh he made the earth, known as Midgard (middle garden), and from his blood the sea, while from his bones he made the mountains, from his teeth the cliffs, and from his hair the trees. The giant’s skull was then fixed over the earth to form the vault of the sky, and was held in place at the four corners by four dwarfs, Nordri, Sudri, Austri, and Westri, from whom we have obtained the names North, South, East, and West. Next the gods made the sun and moon, which were placed in golden chariots driven by Sol and Mani, the daughter and son of a giant who had named his children after the newly-created sun and moon. The Northmen thought that they could see on the moon the outline of two children carrying a pail, and the story goes that Mani, while travelling across the sky, one night caught up two children, Hiuki and Bil, who were compelled by their cruel father to carry water all night. Hiuki and Bil are still known to us in the familiar story of Jack and Jill. The sun and moon were said to be pursued continually by two fierce wolves, whose shapes could be seen in the clouds, and who, if they caught them up, would swallow them and plunge the world in darkness. Sometimes they nearly succeeded, and thus caused the eclipses.

Having completed the earth and peopled it with men and women, the gods, led by Odin, built magnificent palaces for themselves in Asgard, their home. The most famous of these was Valhalla, to which the bravest and mightiest of the mortals who fell in battle were summoned at their death. The walls of Valhalla were made of spears, and golden shields formed the roof. In the hall stood long tables, at which the dead heroes feasted.

The Northmen honoured a great fighter above all men, and they even thought it a disgrace for him to die in any other way than sword in hand. The great ambition of every fighting man was to be called to Valhalla after his death, there to spend his time in fighting and feasting. The fortunate ones were chosen from among the slain on the battle-fields by the Valkyries, Odin’s battle-maidens, whose horses carried them through the air and over the sea. They rode among the storm-clouds, and the flash of their spears was seen in the lightning.

Odin was often pictured as sitting on a throne from which he could see the whole world, and wearing a suit of armour, covered with a blue mantle, which represented the sky. In his hand he held a famous spear, Gungnir, which never missed its mark. On his shoulders sat two ravens, Thought and Memory, which he sent out into the world every day to obtain news of all that happened. Like Tiu, the God of War, Odin suffered from a disfigurement, having lost one of his eyes. This loss is explained in the following story.

After the creation of the world, Odin wished to obtain great wisdom which would place him far above the other gods. This he could only procure from Mimir’s spring, in whose clear waters the future was mirrored. Odin, therefore, visited Mimir and begged a draught of the wonderful water, but Mimir would only grant the request in return for one of Odin’s eyes. The god was willing to make even this sacrifice for the great knowledge the water would give him, and accordingly he plucked out one of his eyes and gave it to Mimir, who sank it deep in the spring where it could always be seen shining. Odin then drank deep of the water, and thus gained the wisdom for which he was always famous.

All the life of the world, including even the lives of the gods, was said to depend on an enormous ash tree, Yggdrasil, the Tree of Life. This tree was created by Odin, and had three roots, one in the Underworld, another in Midgard, near Mimir’s spring, and the third in Asgard. It grew to such a height that it overtopped the whole world, and in its topmost branches sat an eagle with a falcon between its eyes. The falcon could see all three kingdoms, and reported all that happened in them to the gods. In the Underworld was a dragon, which continually gnawed the roots of Yggdrasil in order to destroy it and so bring about the downfall of the gods. To prevent this disaster, the tree was daily watered from a fountain in Asgard, whose magic waters kept it continually green.

Joining Asgard and the earth was a bridge made of fire, earth, and water, whose colours were those of the rainbow. This bridge was guarded against the giants by a god named Heimdall, whose sight and hearing were so keen that he could see a hundred leagues by night as well as by day, and could hear the grass growing on the earth and the wool on the sheep’s back! He was armed with a flashing sword, and carried a horn with which he was to give warning when the giants should come against Asgard.

Odin was the inventor of Runes, the first alphabet of the Northmen. The letters consisted almost entirely of straight lines placed in different groups and positions, and were thought at first to have a magical meaning. Each god had a special rune or sign, and the use of the sign was supposed to bring help from the god. Thus all fighters carved the rune of Tiu on their swords in order that they might have his aid in battle. Runes were afterwards used in the ordinary way for writing, and very old runes have been found carved on stones in Scandinavia and in England. As the inventor of runes, Odin is like Mercury, who was supposed to have given the Romans their alphabet.

In addition to being the wisest of the gods, the inventor of runes, and the God of Eloquence, Odin was also the God of Poetry. The gift of poetry was guarded very jealously by the gods, and was only granted to mortals in special cases. Odin obtained the gift for himself and the other gods only with great difficulty. Hidden away in a hollow mountain, and carefully watched over by a giantess, were three vessels containing a magic fluid, which gave to anyone who drank of it the gift of poetry and song. Odin, knowing of this magic drink, determined to obtain it. Accordingly he set out for the land of the giants, dressed as a mortal, and wearing a broad-brimmed hat to hide the fact that he had only one eye. He hired himself as a servant to Baugi, the brother of the giant Suttung, to whom the vessels belonged, and asked as payment for his labour one draught of the magic fluid. As soon as his work was finished, Odin demanded payment, but Baugi was afraid to ask his brother for the drink, and suggested they should win it for themselves by trickery. They came to the mountain where the vessels were hidden, and bored a hole right through to the cave inside. Odin then changed himself into a snake and wriggled through the hole, just in time to escape the giant, who tried to kill him as he entered the hole. Having found his way into the cave, Odin again took on the form of a god, and begged the giantess who watched over the vessels to allow him just a sip of the magic drink. The giantess at last consented, but Odin, instead of taking a sip, quickly emptied all the vessels, and then, making his way out of the cave transformed himself into an eagle and flew swiftly towards Asgard. He soon discovered, however, that the giant Suttung was pursuing him, also in the form of an eagle. As he neared Asgard the gods caught sight of him, and, seeing that the giant was gaining on Odin, they gathered together a great quantity of fuel and piled it on the palace walls. Immediately Odin had passed over the wall the gods set fire to the fuel, and the flames rose so high that the wings of the pursuing giant were scorched, and he fell into the fire and was burnt.

Odin seldom used this precious gift of poetry himself, but imparted it to his son Bragi, who became the minstrel of the gods and sang many songs in honour of the gods and the great heroes in Valhalla. All the singers among men, the bards, or scalds, as they were sometimes called, were thought to have received the gift from Odin, and were greatly honoured for that reason.

The Creation of the World

In the beginning, ere the Gods were born,
Before the Heavens were builded, thou didst slay
The giant Ymir, whom the abyss brought forth,
Thou and thy brethren fierce, the sons of Bor,
And cast his trunk to choke the abysmal void.
But of his flesh and members thou didst build
The earth and ocean, and above them Heaven.
And from the flaming world, where Muspel reigns,
Thou sent’st and fetched’st fire, and madest lights,
Sun, moon, and stars, which thou hast hung in Heaven,
Dividing clear the paths of night and day.
And Asgard thou didst build, and Midgard fort.
MATTHEW ARNOLD–Balder Dead

 

The Heroes of Valhalla

And all the Gods, and all the Heroes, woke.
And from their beds the Heroes rose, and donn’d
Their arms, and led their horses from the stall,
And mounted them, and in Valhalla’s court,
Were ranged; and then the daily fray began.
And all day long they there are hack’d and hewn,
‘Mid dust, and groans, and limbs lopp’d off, and blood;
But all at night returned to Odin’s hall,
Woundless and fresh; such lot is theirs in heaven.
And the Valkyries on their steeds went forth
Tow’rd earth and fights of men; and at their side
Skulda, the youngest of the Normes, rode;
And over Bifrost, where is Heimdall’s watch,
Past Midgard fortress, down to earth they came;
There through some battle-field, where men fall fast,
Their horses fetlock-deep in blood, they ride,
And pick the bravest warriors out for death,
Whom they bring back with them at night to heaven
To glad the Gods, and feast in Odin’s hall.
MATTHEW ARNOLD–Balder Dead.

Daily Magickal Applications for Wednesday

To the Romans, this day was called Dies Mercurii, or “Mercury’s day” Mercury was a popular character in the Roman pantheon. A messenger of the gods, he presided over commerce, trade, and anything that required skill or dexterity. The Celts also worshiped Mercury and eventually equated him with the Norse god Odin (some spelling variations on this name include Wotan, Wodin, and Wodan). In Norse mythologies, Odin, like Mercury, is associated with poetry and music. Interestingly enough, both Odin and Mercury were regarded as psychopomps, or the leaders of souls, in their individual mythologies.

Odin, one of the main gods in Norse mythology, was constantly seeking wisdom. He traveled the world in disguise as a one-eyed man with a long gray beard, wearing an old, beat-up hat and carrying a staff or a spear (which brings to my mind images of Gandalf from The Lord of the Rings). In the Old English language, this day of Mercury evolved into Wodnes daeg, “Woden’s day,” or Wednesday.

Wednesday carries all of the planetary and magickal energies and associations of the witty and nimble god Mercury himself. Some of these mercurial traits included good communication skills, cleverness, intelligence, creativity, business sense, writing, artistic talent, trickiness, and thievery. And don’t forget all of those wise and enigmatic qualities associated with the Norse god Odin/Wodin, not to mention the goddess Athena’s contributions of music, the arts, handmade crafts, and writing. Wednesdays afford excellent opportunities for seeking wisdom, changing your circumstances, and improving your skills, be they in trade and commerce, music and art, or in communication and writing.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

The Witches Almanac for Wednesday, April 4th

Megalesia (Roman)

Waning Moon

Moon Phase: Third Quarter

Moon Sign: Scorpio

Moon enters Sagittarius 2:55 am

Incense: Marjoram

Color: Topaz

Correspondences for Wednesday, April 4th

Dedicated to the Teutonic god Woden or Odin, an aspect of the “All-Father” god of knowledge wisdom enlightenment and combat, the parallel of Hermes.

Element : Air

Planet: Mercury

Zodiac Sign : Virgo / Gemini

Angel : Raphael

Metal : Mercury

Incense / Perfumes : Jasmine, Lavender, Sweet Pea

Oil: Benzoin, Clary Sage, Eucalytus, Lavender

Color : Red, Orange, Light Blue

Stones : Bloodstone,Garnet, Aventurine, Hematite, Moss Agate and Sodalite

Plants/Herbs : Almond, Anise, Cherry, Clover, Dandelion, Dill, Fern, Hazel, Hyssop, Lavender, Lemongrass, Lilac, Mace, Peppermint, Rosemary, Vervain

Magick to Work: the conscious mind, study, travel, divination, consulting oracles, wisdom, communication ,cleverness, contracts, creativity, information, intellect, memory, erception, science, wisdom, writing

 

Wednesday Is Ruled By Mercury

Wednesdays are wild and wacky days. They are for communication, change, cunning, and the arts. This is a Mercury day, and just its patron god this day is full of contradictions, change, and excitement. Some suggestions for Wednesday enchantments would include:

Pulling a little Wednesday color magic into your life by wearing purples or orange

Carrying a multipurpose agate with you and tapping into its various charms

Working with magical plants such as the fern for protection. This plant will also boost the power of any other magical plants with which it is arranged.

Incorporating lavender into charms and spells for transformation

Using the charming scent of lily of the valley to improve your memory, or working with the aspen tree for communication

Calling on Athena, patron of arts and crafts, for inspiration for a new project
Fanning out a Tarot spell to increase you creativity

Calling on Hermes on a Wednesday night to bring movement and good luck into your life

Mercury’s Energy

*Notes: perform on a Wednesday and/or during the waxing Moon with the Full Moon being strongest. An orange or violet candle is associated with any magick cast on this day.

Day: Wednesday

Color: Orange, violet, multicolored, pale yellow

Metal: Quicksilver, alloys.

Stones: Carnelian, fire opal, agate

Plants: Anise, caraway , cassia, club mosss, dittany of Crete, lavender, licorice, parsley, sandalwood, storax

Rules: Gemini, Virgo

Oils: Lavender, lemon, lily of valley, nutmeg, sandalwood, styrax, vervain

Rituals Involving: Intellect, memory, science, creativity, business, magickal conjuration, divination, prediction, eloquence, gift of tongues, speed, speech, writing, poetry, inspiration, improvement of mind power, healing of nervous disorders.

Physical Chant for Mercury:

Magick, the Arts, success on my trade,
Business wisdom and divination,
These gifts I would gain for my physical growth
And to help in my conjurations.

Source

Dancing with Dragons, Invoking Their Ageless Wisdom and Power
D. J. Conway, Author

Since We Started Researching The Gods & Goddesses – Appropriate Worship  Honoring the Gods the Right Way

One issue that comes up often for people learning about modern Pagan spirituality is the concept of appropriate worship. There tends to be some question about what, exactly, is the right offering to make to the gods or goddesses of one’s tradition — and how we should honor them when making those offerings.

Not All Gods Are the Same
Let’s imagine that you have two friends. First, we have Jill. She likes French cuisine, Meg Ryan movies, soft music and expensive wine.

She’s someone who lets you cry on her shoulder when you’re feeling blue, and she offers some wise and thoughtful insight when you can’t solve a problem on your own. One of her best qualities is her ability to listen.

You also have a friend named Steve. He’s a lot of fun, and sometimes shows up at your house at midnight toting a six-pack. Steve likes watching movies with lots of explosions, took you to your first Metallica concert, and can rebuild a Harley with his eyes closed. He eats mostly bratwurst and Funyuns, enjoys picking up strippers at bars, and is the guy you call when you want to have a good time.

When Jill comes over, are you going to have a nice quiet dinner with a glass of wine and Josh Groban playing in the background, or are you going to hand her a cheeseburger and a beer, pull out the Wii for a round of God of War, and stay up until 3 am seeing who can burp and fart the loudest?

Likewise, if Steve shows up, are you going to do things that he enjoys, or are you going to say, “Hey, Steve, let’s watch Steel Magnolias and talk about our feelings?

What Do Your Gods Want?
Much like our friends Jill and Steve, the gods have certain things they like and value, and certain things they don’t.

To offer one of them something better suited to another is not only disrespectful, it shows that you really don’t know them at all and worse yet, haven’t even taken the time to learn about them. What do you think Steve is going to say when you offer him a vegetarian soup and turn on some chick flick? He’s going to bail, that’s what he’s going to do. Because not only did you present him with something he dislikes, but you’re showing a fundamental lack of knowledge of someone you claim is your friend.

Sure, you love Jill and Steve equally, but they’re not the same person, and they don’t have the same likes and dislikes. The gods are the same way — you may honor both the goddess Aphrodite and the god Mars, but that doesn’t mean Mars wants to you to leave him a bouquet of flowers and a glass of milk while you sing him Kumbaya. You can also be sure that Aphrodite probably isn’t interested in offerings of blood and raw meat, or warrior chants.

Get To Know Your Gods
The idea of right or appropriate worship is not about someone telling you what’s “right or wrong.” It is simply the concept that one should take the time to do things – including worship and offerings – in a way that is conducive to the demands and needs of the god or goddess in question.

So, how do you do this? Start by researching and reading. If there are myths and legends of the pantheon your gods belong to, study these stories. For instance, are you a devotee of the Greek gods? Read the Homeric hymns and the writing of other Greek philosophers. Do you follow a Celtic path? Pick up a copy of The Mabinogion. Do some meditation, reach out to them, and see if they just flat-out tell you what they want.

When you honor the gods, take the time to put some thought into it. Ask yourself what it is you hope to obtain by making the offering — are you trying to gain something, or merely show your appreciation and gratitude to the Divine? Learn about the types of deities you’re about to honor, and study the specific gods and goddesses of your tradition, so that when you do make an offering or present a ritual in their name, you can do so in a way that truly does them honor.

Source

Patti Wigington, Author

Published on ThoughtCo

Magickal Applications for Wednesday

To the Romans, this day was called Dies Mercurii, or “Mercury’s day” Mercury was a popular character in the Roman pantheon. A messenger of the gods, he presided over commerce, trade, and anything that required skill or dexterity. The Celts also worshiped Mercury and eventually equated him with the Norse god Odin (some spelling variations on this name include Wotan, Wodin, and Wodan). In Norse mythologies, Odin, like Mercury, is associated with poetry and music. Interestingly enough, both Odin and Mercury were regarded as psychopomps, or the leaders of souls, in their individual mythologies.

Odin, one of the main gods in Norse mythology, was constantly seeking wisdom. He traveled the world in disguise as a one-eyed man with a long gray beard, wearing an old, beat-up hat and carrying a staff or a spear (which brings to my mind images of Gandalf from The Lord of the Rings). In the Old English language, this day of Mercury evolved into Wodnes daeg, “Woden’s day,” or Wednesday.

Wednesday carries all of the planetary and magickal energies and associations of the witty and nimble god Mercury himself. Some of these mercurial traits included good communication skills, cleverness, intelligence, creativity, business sense, writing, artistic talent, trickiness, and thievery. And don’t forget all of those wise and enigmatic qualities associated with the Norse god Odin/Wodin, not to mention the goddess Athena’s contributions of music, the arts, handmade crafts, and writing. Wednesdays afford excellent opportunities for seeking wisdom, changing your circumstances, and improving your skills, be they in trade and commerce, music and art, or in communication and writing.

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

 


The Witches Spell of the Day for April 4th – Binding off Harm

You’ll need:
A photo of the person you wish to bind
Black pen
Black glove
3 tsp black pepper
Small round mirror
Twine
Dark cloth
Black candle (optional)
You can burn a black candle while you do this spell if you wish.

If a person wishes to harm you, take their picture and write their name nine times on the back in black. Take a black glove and place 3 tsp of black pepper in the glove. Take a small round mirror and place this picture facing the mirror, and place the glove stretched out as a hand on the back of this picture. Take some twine and wrap it all together while saying:

“Everything you say to me, everything you do,
bounces off of me three times, and sticks itself on you.”

Then wrap it into a dark or black cloth and hide it somewhere near the entry door which is most used in your house. Results should start to be evident in about three days.

Best done on a Wednesday night.

 

Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days A Year for April 4th

April 4th

Megalesia Mater

This day marked the beginning of Ludi Megalenses, the first day of the weeklong Megalesia Mater in honor of the Goddess Cybele–generally described as Magna Mater. Her cult originated in Asia Minor and came to be centered on Mount Dindymus at Pessinus in Phyrgia, where she was know as Agdisis. Her consort was Attis, and there was a great deal of mythology that surrounded their relationship.

It was during the war with Carthage that Cybele’s cult was brought to Rome in 204 B.C., following a prophecy in the Sibylline Books and advice from the Oracle at Delphi. The prophecy stated that the invaders would be driven back if Magna Mater was brought to Rome. Soon after, her sacred black stone was brought to Rome and housed in the temple of Victoria, later to be placed in a temple on the Palatine Hill, which was dedicated to Magna Mater in 191 B.C.

The Megalesia lasted from April 4 to 10 and originally consisted of games in the Circus Maximus. It was a festival of fertility in the most primal of forums. A large pine tree representing the God Attis was adorned with white cloth and placed in the center of the temple of Cybele. The novice priests would then cut their arms and sacrifice their virility to the God. The severed portions of their manhood were dashed against the pine tree and then buried. This brutal and bloody display of adoration was considered instrumental in recalling Attis to life,k and thus the return of summer growth.

 

Magickal Activity for Monday, April 4th, The Day of Megalesia Mater

Crystal Divination

As it was the Oracle of Delphi that brought Cybele to Rome, the act of divining the future became associaed with her. It seems only fitting to celebrate the power of this Goddess by working with some form of divination on this day. For this magickal activity you will need a clear glass bowl filled with spring water, a quartz crystal, and a white taper candle.

Place the crystal in the clear glass bowl and cover it with the spring water. Set the white candle just behind the bowl and light it. With your right index finger, slowly stir the water around the crystal as you chant:

Blessed spirits of the night,
Bless me now with second sight.

Focus your attention on the water. It will begin to cloud over with a fine mist. Once the mist begins to flow out of the bowl, stop stirring the water and look directly into the bowl. Center your attention on the crystal and repeat the following:

Fire and water, crystal clear,
Let the visions now appear.

Visions of the future will appear. When the visions begin to fade, make a mental note of what you saw. Snuff out the candle and place your crystal under your pillow. The crystal will provide you with more information during your dream time. Later, write your visions down in your dream journal or magickal Book of Shadows.

 

Humorous Quote

Your average witch is not, by nature, a social animal…. The natural size of a coven is one. Witches only get together when they can’t avoid it.

 

12 Days To Go

Please Make A Purchase
Magickal Necessities

Or

If Possible A Donation, Either is Greatly Appreciated!
Thank you!

 

donate

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s