The Witches Digest for Friday, October 13th, Part 2 – The Witches Guide to Fridays

 

The Witches Digest for Friday, October 13th

Part 2, The Witches Guide for Fridays

Today Is Friday, October 13th

Friday is the day of Venus. It takes it name from Frigg, the Goddess of love and transformation. She rules the spiritual side of a person that manifests in the physical. Because of this, Friday is often thought of as dangerously unpredictable. This is expressed in an old East Anglian adage:

Friday’s day will have its trick
The fairest or foulest day of the week.

Deity: Frigg

Zodiac Sign: Taurus/Libra

Planet: Venus

Tree: Apple

Herb: Vervain

Stone: Sapphire/Chrsolite

Animal: Bull/Serpent

Element: Earth

Color: Yellow/Violet

Number: 7

Rune: Peorth(P)

 

Celtic Tree Month of Gort(Ivy) – September 30 – October 27

Runic Half-Month of Wyn(joy) – October 13 – October 27

Goddess of the Month of Hathor – October 3 – October 30

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick

Pagan Calendar for Friday, October 13th

Fontinalia was a Roman festival, that is, holy wells and springs, were venerated. Wyn litterally means joy, the rune being the shape of a weather vane. The mystery of harmony within a disharmonious world is now manifest. Wyn stands for the creation of harmony within the given conditions of the present.

Source

The Pagan Book of Days
Nigel Pennick


On Friday, October 13th, We Celebrate the God Anubis

Anubis

God of Embalming and Funerals

Anubis was the jackal-headed Egyptian god of death and embalming, and is said to be the son of Osiris by Nepthys, although in some legends his father is Set. It is the job of Anubis to weigh the souls of the dead, and determine whether they were worthy of admittance to the underworld. As part of his duties, he is the patron of lost souls and orphans.

History and Mythology

After Osiris was killed by Set, it was Anubis’ job to embalm the body and wrap it in bandages — thus making Osiris the first of the mummies.

Later, when Set attempted to attack and defile Osiris’ corpse, Anubis defended the body and helped Isis restore Osiris to life. In later periods, Osiris became the god of the underworld, and Anubis guides the deceased into his presence. In the pyramid texts, a passage reads, “Get thee onwards, Anubis, into Amenti, onwards, onwards to Osiris.”

Prayers to Anubis are found in many ancient sites in Egypt. Later on, along with Thoth, he was absorbed into the Greek Hermes, and was represented for a while as Hermanubis. As a protector of cemeteries, Egyptians believed Anubis watched over tombs from a high mountain. From this strategic vantage point, he could see anyone who might attempt to desecrate the graves of the deceased. He is often invoked as protection against those who would rob a tomb or commit evil acts in the necropolis.

According to our Ancient History Expery, NS Gill, “The cult of Anubis is very ancient, probably pre-dating that of Osiris.

In parts of Egypt, Anubis may have been more important than Osiris… As well as being ancient, the cult of Anubis lasted a long time, continuing into the second century A.D., and is a feature in the Golden Ass, written by the Roman author Apuleius.”

Author Geraldine Pinch says in Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of of Ancient Egypt, “The jackals and wild dogs who lived on the edge of the desert were carrion eaters who might dig up shallowly buried corpses.

To avert this horrible end for their dead, the early Egyptians tried to placate Anubis, “the dog who swallows millions.” Most of the epithets of Anubis link him with death and burial. He was “the one who is in the place of embalming,” “the Lord of the Sacred Land” [the desert cemeteries], and “the Foremost of the Westerners,” that is, the leader of the dead.”

Appearance of Anubis

Anubis is typically portrayed as half human, and half jackal or dog. The jackal has connections to funerals in Egypt – bodies which were not buried properly might be dug up and eaten by hungry, scavenging jackals. Anubis’ skin is almost always black in images, because of its association with the colors of rot and decay. Embalmed bodies tend to turn black as well, so the color is very appropriate for a funeral god.
Prayer to Anubis

Use this simple prayer to call upon Anubis during a ritual to honor your dead.

O, Anubis! Mighty Anubis!
[Name] has entered the gates to your realm,
And we ask that you deem him worthy.
His spirit is a brave one,
And his soul is an honorable one.
O, Anubis! Mighty Anubis!
As you take his measure,
And weigh his heart as he stands before you,
Know that he was loved by many,
And will be remembered by all.
Anubis, welcome [Name] and deem him worthy of entrance,
That he may walk through your realm,
And be under your protection for all eternity.
O, Anubis! Mighty Anubis!
Watch over [Name] as he bows before you.

Author

Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Friday’s Magick

Magickal Intent:
Lust
Romance
Happiness
Travel
Friends
Beauty
Sexuality
Harmony
Growth

Planet: Venus

Colors: Pink, Aqua, Seafoam

Crystals: Coral, Emerald, Rose Quartz

The Magickal Day of Friday

Friday falls at the end of the work week for many of us, and that means we get a chance to relax for a little bit! Mark your Fridays with colors like pink and aqua, and metals such as copper. This is a day ruled by the planet Venus, so it should be no surprise that Venus and Aphrodite – goddesses of love and beauty – are associated with Fridays. This is a day named for the Norse goddess Freyja, so be sure to take a moment to honor her as well.

Gemstones associated with Friday include coral, emerald and rose quartz, and plants like strawberries, apple blossoms and feverfew are also related. This is a good day to do spellwork associated with family life and fertility, sexuality, harmony, friendship, growth. Take advantage of Friday’s correspondences and plant a seed, make something grow, and enjoy your blessings

*Note: There are a lot of disputes as to the origins of the word Friday, because there is still a great deal of discussion as to whether it was named for Freyja or Frigga, and whether they were the same deity or two separate ones. Some scholars believe that while they may have eventually become two distinctly different goddesses, they could have had their origins in a single, common Proto-Germanic deity.

Author

Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by ThoughtCo

 

The Witches Guide to Friday

Ruler: Freya, Venus

Colors: Emerald green or pink

Power Hours: Sunrise and the 8th, 16th, and 24th hours following.

Key Words: Love, money, health

It is easy to spot the ruler of this day by its name. In the word Friday, we see the roots of the name of the Norse goddess Freya, a goddess of love and fertility, and the most beautiful and propitious of the goddesses thus the verse “Friday’s child is loving and giving.”

In Spanish this day of the week is called Viernes and is derived from the goddess Venus. Matters of love, human interaction, the fluidity of communication, sewing and the creation of artistic garments, household improvement, shopping, and party planning all fall under the aspects of Friday and its ruling planet, Venus.

Friday’s angels are Ariel/Uriel, Rachiel, and Sachiel. Rachiel also concerns himself with human sexuality and is a presiding spirit of the planet Venus.

On Fridays, the hour of sunrise and every eight hours after that are also ruled by Venus, and that makes these times of the day doubly blessed. These four hours are the strongest four hours for conducting ritual.

Check the local newspaper, astrological calendar, or almanac to determine your local sunrise.

Source

Gypsy Magic

Friday’s Witchery

Love magick is a perennial popular topic. However, there is more to this topic than meets the eye. There are many enchanting layers here for us to explore on this day of the week. What about creating a loving home, or producing a loving and nurturing family? What about keeping your intimate relationships vital and on track? How about promoting happy, healthy, and enduring friendships? See, there is more to be considered than just the “You shall be mine…” type of fictional love spell.

Don’t forget that many of the deities associated with Fridays are also parents. So, yes, while this is the day to work on romance, sex, and love spells, there is additional magick to be considered here, which makes Fridays a more well-rounded and bigger opportunity for witchery than many folks ever truly realize. The truest, strongest magick always comes from the heart.

Source

Book of Witchery – Spells, Charms & Correspondences For Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

The Witches Almanac for Friday, October 13th

Fontinalia (Roman)

Waning Moon

Moon Phase: Fourth Quarter

Moon Sign” Cancer

Moon enters Leo 2:41 am

Incense: Cypress

Color: Pink

FRIDAY CORRESPONDENCES

Venus/Water/East/West/South/Dawn/Female/Libra/Taurus

 

Magickal Intentions: Love, Romance, Marriage, Sexual Matters, Physical Beauty, Friendship and Partnerships, Strangers, Heart

Color: aqua, blue, light blue, brown, green, pale green, magenta, peach, pink, rose, white, all pastels

Number: 5, 6

Metal: copper

Charm: green or white garments, scepter

Stone: alexandrite, amethyst, coral, diamond, emerald, jade, jet, black moonstone, peridot, smoky quartz, tiger’s-eye, pink tourmaline

Animal: camel, dove, elephant, goat, horse, pigeon, sparrow

Plant: apple, birch, cherry, clematis, clove, coriander, heather, hemlock, hibiscus, ivy, lotus, moss, myrtle, oats, pepperwort, peppermint, pinecone, quince, raspberry, rose, pink rose, red rose, rose hips, saffron, sage, savin, stephanotis, strawberry, thyme, vanilla, verbena, violet, water lily, yarrow, and all flowers

Incense: ambergris, camphor, mace, musk, myrrh, rose, saffron, sage, sandalwood, sweetgrass, vanilla, violet, all floral scents

Goddess: Aphrodite, Asherah, Baalith, Brigid, Erzulie, Freya (Passionate Queen), Frigg, Gefion, Harbor (Beautiful One), Hestia, Inanna, Ishtar (Lady of Passion and Desire), Lakshmi, Lilith, Mokosh, Nehalennia, Nerthus, Ostara, Pombagira, Sarasvati, Shakti, Shekinah, Sirtur, Al Uzza, Venus (Queen of Pleasure), Vesta

God: Allah, Bacchus, Bes, Cupid, the Dagda, Dionysus, El, Eros (God of Love), Freyr, Frit Ailek, Shukra

Evocation: Agrat Bat Mahalat, Anael, Hagiel, Mokosba, Rasbid, Sachiel, Uriel, Velas

Courtesy of Moonlight Musings

 

Your Magickal Applications for Friday

Friday is named after the Norse goddesses of love, Freya and Frigga. There seems to be some debate as to whom the day is actually named after, so I thought I would share a little information so you can decide for yourself.

In Latin, this day is known as Dies Veneris, “Venus’s day.” In Greek, it’s Hermera Aphrodites, which translates to the “day of Aphrodite.” In Old English, this day is called Frige- daeg, or “Freya’s day.” This day has the Germanic title of Frije-dagaz, which, once again, could be Freya’s day or Frigga’s day.

Both Freya and Frigga were Norse goddesses of love and were the Teutonic equivalent of the Greco-Roman Venus/Aphrodite. However, Freya was one of the Vanir—the gods of fertility who supervised the land and sea—and she was the leader of the Valkyries. Frigga, Odin’s wife, was the goddess of the heavens and of married love. She was one of the Aesir—the gods associated with battle, magick and the sky. Freya and Frigga could be looked upon as different aspects of the same goddess. They both were called on to assist in childbirth and then in naming of the new baby. Frigga represented the faithful wife and loving mother, while Freya, who really captured the hearts and imagination of the Norse people, was the passionate mistress and lover.

Fridays classically are days for love, fertility, romance, and beauty magick, as well as working for happiness, harmony in the home, and friendship. So let’s take a look at some of the mythology involved with this loving, voluptuous, passionate, and luxurious day of the week, and see where it leads us.

Source

Book of Witchery – Spells, Charms & Correspondences For Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

 

Friday the 13th and the Perfect Corresponding Spell

Prosperity Pouch

You will need the following items for this spell:
-5” by 5” cloth square ( do not use dark colors for the cloth it could have a negative affect)
– bowl to mix the herbs in
– string or yarn to tie the pouch with
– sage leaves
– bayberries
– pine needles
– almond oil ( optional because its not always available)

Making this pouch is pretty easy.

Step 1: put the bayberries and sage into the bowl. Don’t put the pine needles in because the needles need to be crushed into smaller bits so that they can fit in the pouch.

Step 2: crush the pine needles. You can use your hands or a mortal and pestle for this if you want. Once you are done crushing them, put them in the bowl with the other herbs.

Step 3: mix the berries, sage, and needles together in the same bowl.

Step 4: lay out the cloth on a flat surface. Put two tablespoons of the mixture onto the center of the cloth.

Step 5: put three drops of almond oil on top of the mixture on the cloth. If you don’t have almond oil then you can skip this step.

Step 6: Bring all the sides of the cloth together and twist it once. Tie the sting around the twist tight enough so that it won’t come apart.

Step 7: Now, put the pouch somewhere. You can put it in different places for different things. For example, if you want your garden to prosper, put the pouch in a gardening shed or hang it on the garden fence. I usually put mine on the mantle piece or above the door or next to my bed. You can also carry it with you if you want.These make great gifts too.

Now your done!

Source

Spell by flamewing
From the site, Spells of Magic

 

Samhain Folklore – Halloween Superstitions and Legends

While we Pagans are celebrating Samhain on October 31 (or at the beginning of May, if you’re one of our southern hemisphere readers), for many of our friends and neighbors, this is the Halloween season. No matter what you choose to call it, or how you’re celebrating, this time of year has been a source of superstitions and folklore for a very long time. Many people, including a lot of non-Pagans, believe that there is something ethereal and magical about this night.

The Spirit World
There is no other night in the Neopagan calendar that is so richly associated with the spirit world. Some people refer to it as a night when the “veil” between our world and the spirit realm is thin.

People were often cautioned that if they heard footsteps behind them on the night of Samhain, they shouldn’t turn back because it may be a spirit following them.

If you host a dumb supper and no one speaks, the spirits are far more likely to show up.It was believed that ringing a bell on Samhain kept away evil spirits.

Burying animal bones in front of your house on the night of Samhain will keep evil away, according to some legends of eastern Europe.

Samhain is a good time of year to work on communicating with the spirit world. Reach out to your ancestors, and see what they need you to know.

 

Birds and Animals

Birds, cats, and other animals are often associated with misfortune if you happen to see them during the Samhain season.

Although many people don’t truly believe in these superstitions any more – and often dismiss them as “old wives’ tales,” there’s still a bit of a cultural aspect to them. You may not really think black cats are bad luck, but when one crosses your path, it may give you a reason to pause, just for a moment, and wonder.

Black cats were once seen as bad luck. Remy Melina at LiveScience says, “The black cat’s bad reputation dates back to the Dark Ages, when witch hunts were commonplace. Elderly, solitary women were often accused of witchcraft, and their pet cats were said to be their “familiars,” or demonic animals that had been given to them by the devil. Another medieval myth told that Satan turned himself into a cat when socializing with witches.”
One old folktale from Appalachia says that owls flew down on Samhain night to eat the souls of the dead. According to mountain legends, an owl hooting at midnight signifies death is coming. Likewise, if you see an owl circling during the day, it means bad news for someone nearby.
If the bats come out early on Samhain night, and fly around, it means good weather is coming. During the Middle Ages, the bat was associated with witches, dark magic, sorcery, and even talking to the dead. People in rural Scotland and northern England suspected bats of being messengers between witches and the devil.

Some people believe that if you see a spider on Samhain, it harbors the spirit of a dead ancestor, watching you… so don’t squash it! Some parts of the world see the spider as a negative and malevolent being. In Taranto, Italy, during the seventeenth century, a number of people fell victim to a strange malady which became known as Tarantism, and it was attributed to being bitten by a spider. Those afflicted were seen to dance frenetically for days at a time.

 

Divination

For many of us, this is a perfect night to do some divination. If you’ve ever thought about giving scrying a shot, take advantage of Samhain’s mystery and magic to see what sorts of things are in store for you. Scrying is one of the best known forms of divination, and can be done in a number of ways, but essentially, it’s the practice of looking into some sort of reflective surface to see what sort of metaphysical messages appear. You can make a scrying mirror to keep handy for divination any time of the year, or use fire, or even a bowl of water under a moonlit night.

Even though Samhain isn’t traditionally associated with love, it still features in a number of prominent divination practices related to matters of the heart.

Keep a sprig of rosemary and a sixpence under your pillow on Samhain night, and you’ll dream of your future spouse.

Ever go bobbing for apples at a Halloween party? In England, everyone knows that the first girl to successfully retrieve an apple will be the first to marry!
In parts of England, it was believed that if a maiden carried a lantern to a well on Samhain night and held the light above the water, she would see the reflection of future husband.

If your divination needs are a bit more complex, and you need answers to specific questions rather than vague, general ones, legend has it that Samhain is a good time to brush up on your Tarot reading, pendulum work, or other divination skills. Give it a try and see what messages unfold!

Author

Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Ritual to Honor the Ancestors at Samhain

For many modern Pagans, there has been a resurgence of interest in our family histories. We want to know where we came from and whose blood runs through our veins. Although ancestor worship has traditionally been found more in Africa and Asia, many Pagans with European heritage are beginning to feel the call of their ancestry. This rite can be performed either by itself, or on the third night of Samhain, following the End of Harvest celebration and the Honoring of the Animals.

First, decorate your altar table — you may have already gotten it set up during the End of Harvest rite or for the Ritual for Animals. Decorate your altar with family photos and heirlooms. If you have a family tree chart, place that on there as well. Add postcards, flags, and other symbols of the country your ancestors came from. If you’re lucky enough to live near where your family members are buried, make a grave rubbing and add that as well. In this case, a cluttered altar is perfectly acceptable — after all, each of us is a blend of many different people and cultures.

Have a meal standing by to eat with the ritual. Include lots of dark bread, apples, fall vegetables, and a jug of cider or wine. Set your dinner table, with a place for each family member, and one extra plate for the ancestors. You may want to bake some Soul Cakes.

If your family has household guardians, include statues or masks of them on your altar.

Finally, if a relative has died this year, place a candle for them on the altar. Light candles for other relatives, and as you do so, say the person’s name aloud. It’s a good idea to use tealights for this, particularly if you have a lot of relatives to honor.

Once all the candles have been lit, the entire family should circle the altar.

The oldest adult present leads the ritual. Say:

This is the night when the gateway between
our world and the spirit world is thinnest.
Tonight is a night to call out those who came before us.
Tonight we honor our ancestors.
Spirits of our ancestors, we call to you,
and we welcome you to join us for this night.
We know you watch over us always,
protecting us and guiding us,
and tonight we thank you.
We invite you to join us and share our meal.

The oldest family member then serves everyone else a helping of whatever dishes have been prepared, except for the wine or cider. A serving of each food goes on the ancestors’ plate before the other family members recieve it. During the meal, share stories of ancestors who are no longer among the living — this is the time to remember Grandpa’s war stories he told you as a child, tell about when Aunt Millie used salt instead of sugar in the cake, or reminisce about summers spent at the family homestead in the mountains.

When everyone has finished eating, clear away all the dishes, except for the ancestors’ plate. Pour the cider or wine in a cup, and pass it around the circle (it should end at the ancestor’s place). As each person receives the cup, they recite their genealogy, like so:

I am Susan, daughter of Joyce, the daughter of Malcolm, son of Jonathan…

and so forth. Feel free to add in place names if you like, but be sure to include at least one generation that is deceased. For younger family members, you may wish to have them only recite back to their grandparents, just because otherwise they can get confused.

Go back as many generations as you can, or (in the case of people who have done a lot of genealogy research) as many as you can remember. You may be able to trace your family back to William the Conqueror, but that doesn’t mean you have it memorized. After each person recites their ancestry, they drink from the cider cup and pass it to the next person.

A quick note here — many people are adopted. If you are one them, you are fortunate enough to be able to choose whether you wish to honor your adoptive family, your biological family, or a combination of the two.

If you don’t know the names of your birth parents or their ancestry, there’s nothing wrong with saying, “Daughter of a family unknown.” It’s entirely up to you. The spirits of your ancestors know who you are, even if you don’t know them yet.

After the cup has made its way around the table, place it in front of the ancestors’ plate. This time, a younger person in the family takes over, saying:

This is the cup of remembrance.
We remember all of you.
You are dead but never forgotten,
and you live on within us.

Tips:

If you didn’t do a separate ritual for animals, you can add photos and candles for deceased pets to your family altar.
If you like, you may wish to follow this ritual with a Seance.
If your children are younger, and you’d like to include them in a short ritual, consider holding an Ancestor Ritual for Families With Children instead.

Author

Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Set Up an Ancestor Shrine – Ancestor Altar

In many Pagan traditions, the ancestors are honored, especially at Samhain. This Sabbat, after all, is the night when the veil between our world and the spirit world is at its most fragile. By setting up an ancestor shrine or altar, you can honor the people of your bloodline — your kinfolk and clansmen who have helped to shape the person you are. This altar or shrine can be set up just for the Samhain season, or you can leave it up all year long for meditation and rituals.

If you’ve got the room, it’s nice to use an entire table for this shrine, but if space is an issue, you can create it in a corner of your dresser top, on a shelf, or on the mantle over your fireplace. Regardless, put it in a place where it can be left undisturbed, so that the spirits of your ancestors may gather there, and you can take time to meditate and honor them without having to move stuff around every time someone needs to use the table.

Also, bear in mind that you can honor anyone you like in this shrine. If you have a deceased pet or friend, go ahead and include them. Someone doesn’t have to be a blood relative to be part of our spiritual ancestry. Be sure to read our article on Honoring the Ancestors When You’re Adopted.

Make the Space Special

First, do a physical cleaning of the space. After all, you wouldn’t invite Aunt Gertrude to sit in a dirty chair, would you? Dust the table top or shelf and clear it of any items that are not related to your shrine. If you like, you can consecrate the space as sacred, by saying something like:

I dedicate this space to those
whose blood runs through me.
My fathers and mothers,
my guides and guardians,
and those whose spirits
helped to shape me.

As you do this, smudge the area with sage or sweetgrass, or asperge with consecrated water. If your tradition requires it, you may wish to consecrate the space with all four elements.

Finally, add an altar cloth of some sort to help welcome the ancestors. In some Eastern religions, a red cloth is always used. In some Celtic-based paths, it is believed that a fringe on the altar cloth helps tie your spirit to those of your ancestors. If you have time before Samhain, you might want to make an Ancestor Altar Cloth.

Welcome Your Kin and Clan

There are different types of ancestors, and which ones you choose to include are up to you. There are our blood ancestors, who are the people from whom we directly descend — parents, grandparents, etc. There are also archetypical ancestors, who represent the place that our clan and family came from. Some people also choose to honor the ancestors of the land — the spirits of the place you are now — as a way of thanking them. Finally, there are our spiritual ancestors — those who we may not be tied to by blood or marriage, but who we claim as family nonetheless.

Start by selecting photos of your ancestors. Choose pictures that have meaning for you — and if the photos happen to have the living in them as well as the dead, that’s okay. Arrange the photos on your altar so that you can see all of them at once.

If you don’t have a photo to represent an ancestor, you can use an item that belonged to him or her. If you’re placing someone on your altar who lived prior to the mid-1800s, chances are good there’s no photograph existing. Instead, use an item that may have been the person’s — a piece of jewelry, a dish that’s part of your family heirloom set, a family Bible, etc.

You can also use symbols of your ancestors. If your family is from Scotland, you can use a kilt pin or a length of plaid to represent your clan. If you come from a family of craftsmen, use an item designed or created to symbolize your family’s artisanship.

Finally, you can add a genealogy sheet or family tree to the shrine. If you have in your possession the ashes of a departed loved one, add those as well.

Once you have everything in your shrine that represents your ancestors, consider adding a few other items. Some people like to add votive candles, so they can light them while meditating. You may wish to add a cauldron or cup to symbolize the womb of the Earth Mother. You can also add a symbol of your spirituality — a pentagram, ankh, or some other representation of your beliefs.

Some people leave food offerings on their altars as well, so that their ancestors can partake of a meal with the family.

Use the altar when you perform a Samhain ancestor meditation or a ritual to honor the ancestors.

Author

Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Ancestor Prayer for Samhain

Many people choose to use Samhain as a time of honoring their bloodline. Use this prayer to celebrate your ancestry at Samhain. You can incorporate it into a meditation or ritual, or simply offer it up as thanks to those who came before you.

Samhain Ancestor Prayer

This is the night when the gateway between
our world and the spirit world is thinnest.
Tonight is a night to call out those who came before.
Tonight I honor my ancestors.
Spirits of my fathers and mothers, I call to you,
and welcome you to join me for this night.
You watch over me always,
protecting and guiding me,
and tonight I thank you.
Your blood runs in my veins,
your spirit is in my heart,
your memories are in my soul.

[If you wish, you may want to recite your genealogy here. This can include both your blood family, and your spiritual one.]

With the gift of remembrance.
I remember all of you.
You are dead but never forgotten,
and you live on within me,
and within those who are yet to come.

Author

Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Still with us, haven’t walked under any ladders yet,

Don’t worry you won’t have to reach Part 3 of the Witches Digest for Friday, October 13th

 

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