Posts Tagged With: Zeus

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Herakles/Hercules

Gothic Comments

March 11th

Herakles/Hercules

This day celebrates the super-human strength of the Greek hero-God Herakles, son of Alcmene by Zeus. His many adventures included fighting a bull-headed snake to win the  love of his earthly wife Deianeira. During the battle, he tore off one of the animal’s horn which became the cornucopia. He then tought and killled the centaur Nessus, who had tried to rape her. Before Nessus died, he gave deianeria some of his Herakles by burning him. Distressed Herakles sacrificed himself upon Mt. Oeta. When Herakles was admitted to Mt. Olympus as a God, Zeus gave his daughter Hebe for his wife. They had two children, Alexiares and Anicerus.

About these ads
Categories: Book of Spells | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

ZEUS BINDING SPELL

ZEUS BINDING SPELL

  God: I call upon Zeus, chief ruler of immortals

And mortals alike, most powerful of all the gods,

Who was known as the omnipotent Father Zeus,

And to the Romans as Jupiter, and who punishes

those who lie and break. 

Around I bind you three times three 

No more bad things you’ll think of me    

Around I bind you three times three 

No more bad things you’ll say of me 

Around I bind you three times three 

No more bad things you’ll do to me 

Around I bind you three times three    

And if these things continue to be 

Then back upon you three times three 

‘Til totally vanquished you will be 

By the powers of three times three 

By Earth and Fire, Air and Sea 

I fix this spell, then set it free

‘Twill give no harm to mine or me    

As I so will, So Mote It Be!

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Dark Arts' Spells | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Myth of Cupid and Psyche (The Divine Love Story)

The Myth of Cupid and Psyche

The Divine Love Story or Myth of Cupid and Psyche

By , About.com

The great Greek goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite, was born from the foam near the island of Cyprus, for which reason she is referred to as “the Cyprian.” Aphrodite was a jealous goddess, but she was also passionate. Not only did she love the men and gods in her life, but her sons and grandchildren, as well. Sometimes her possessive instincts led her too far. When her son Cupid found a human to love — one whose beauty rivaled hers — Aphrodite did all in her power to thwart the marriage.

How Cupid and Psyche Met

Psyche was worshiped for her beauty in her homeland. This drove Aphrodite mad, so she sent a plague and let it be known the only way the land could get back to normal was to sacrifice Psyche. The king, who was Psyche’s father, tied Psyche up and left her to her death at the hands of some presumed fearsome monster. You may note that this isn’t the first time in Greek mythology that this happened. The great Greek hero Perseus found his bride, Andromeda, tied up as prey for a sea monster. Andromeda was sacrificed to appease Poseidon who had ravaged the country of Ethiopia, which was ruled by her father, after Queen Cassiopeia had boasted about her own beauty. In the case of Psyche, it was Aphrodite’s son Cupid who released and married the princess.

The Mystery About Cupid

Unfortunately for the young couple, Cupid and Psyche, Aphrodite was not the only one trying to foul things up. Psyche had two sisters who were as jealous as Aphrodite.

Cupid was a wonderful lover and husband to Psyche, but there was one odd thing about their relationship: He made sure Psyche never saw what he looked like. Psyche didn’t mind. She had a fulfilling night life in the dark with her husband, and during the day, she had all the luxuries she could ever want.

When the sisters learned about the luscious, extravagant lifestyle of their lucky, beautiful sister, they urged Psyche to pry into the area of his life that Psyche’s husband kept hidden from her.

Cupid was a god, and gorgeous as he had to have been with Aphrodite for a mother, but for reasons known best to him, he didn’t want his mortal wife to see his form. Psyche’s sister didn’t know he was a god, although they may have suspected it. However, they did know that Psyche’s life was much happier than theirs. Knowing their sister well, they preyed on her insecurities and persuaded Psyche that her husband was a hideous monster.

Psyche assured her sisters they were wrong, but since she’d never seen him, even she started having doubts. Psyche decided to satisfy the girls’ curiosity, so that night she took a candle to her sleeping husband in order to look at him.

Cupid Deserts Psyche

Cupid’s angelic form was exquisite, so Psyche stood there gawking at her husband with her candle melting. While Psyche dawdled, ogling, a bit of wax dripped on her husband. Her rudely awakened, irate, disobeyed, injured husband-angel-god flew away.

“See, I told you she was a no good human,” said mother Aphrodite to her convalescing son Cupid. “Now you’ll have to be content among the gods.”

Cupid might have gone along with the de facto divorce, but Psyche couldn’t. Impelled by love of her gorgeous husband, she implored her mother-in-law to give her another chance. Aphrodite agreed, but ungraciously, saying, “I cannot conceive that any serving-wench as hideous as yourself could find any means to attract lovers save by making herself their drudge; wherefore now I myself will make trial of your worth.”

The Epic Trials of Psyche

But Aphrodite had no intention of playing fair. She devised 4 tasks (not 3 as is conventional in mythic hero quests; this is a feminine story), each task more exacting than the last. Psyche passed the first 3 challenges with flying colors:

  1. sort a huge mount of barley, millet, poppy seeds, lentils, and beans.   Ants (pismires) help her sort the grains within the time allotted.
  2. gather a hank of the wool of the shining golden sheep.   A reed tells her how to accomplish this task without being killed by the vicious animals.
  3. fill a crystal vessel with the water of the spring that feeds the Styx and Cocytus.   An eagle helps her out.

But the last task was too much for Psyche:

4. Aphrodite asked Psyche to bring her back a box of Persephone’s beauty cream.

Going to the Underworld was a challenge for the bravest of the Greek mythical heroes. Demigod Hercules could go to the Underworld without much bother, but even Theseus had trouble and had to be rescued by Hercules. Psyche barely batted an eye when Aphrodite told her she would have to go to the most dangerous region known to mortals. That part was easy, especially after the tower told her how to find the entryway to the Underworld, how get around Charon and Cerberus, and how to behave before the Underworld queen.

The part of the fourth task that was too much for Psyche was the temptation to make herself more beautiful. If the perfect beauty of the perfect goddess Aphrodite needed this Underworld beauty cream, Psyche reasoned, how much more would it help an imperfect mortal woman? Thus, Psyche retrieved the box successfully, but then she opened it and fell into a deathlike sleep, as Aphrodite had secretly predicted.

  “And by and by shee opened the boxe where she could perceive no beauty nor any thing else, save onely an infernall and deadly sleepe, which immediatly invaded all her members as soone as the boxe was uncovered, in such sort that she fell downe upon the ground, and lay there as a sleeping corps.”   William Adlington Translation (1566)

Reunion and Happy Ending to the Myth of Cupid and Psyche

At this point, divine intervention was called for if the story were to have an ending that made anyone really happy. With Zeus’ connivance, Cupid brought his wife to Olympus where, at Zeus’s command, she was given nectar and ambrosia so she would become immortal.

  “Incontinently after Jupiter commanded Mercury to bring up Psyches, the spouse of Cupid, into the Pallace of heaven. And then he tooke a pot of immortality, and said, Hold Psyches, and drinke, to the end thou maist be immortall, and that Cupid may be thine everlasting husband.

On Olympus, in the presence of the other gods, Aphrodite reluctantly reconciled with her pregnant daughter-in-law, who was about to give birth to a grandchild Aphrodite would (obviously) dote on, Pleasure.

Another Story of Cupid and Psyche

C.S. Lewis took Apuleius’ version of this myth and turned it on its ear in Till We Have Faces. The tender love story is gone. Instead of having the story seen through the eyes of Psyche, it’s seen through her sister Orval’s perspective. Instead of the refined Aphrodite of the Roman story, the mother goddess in C.S. Lewis’ version is a far more weighty, chthonic Earth-Mother-Goddess power.

More on C.S. Lewis and the re-telling of the Cupid and Psyche myth: A Great Gulf Fixed: The Problem of Obsessive Love in C.S. Lewis’ Till We Have Faces

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities, The Goddesses, The Gods | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In The Honor Of Hecate – Hecate Blessing Rite

Witchy Cat Graphics & Comments
Hecate Blessing Rite

Items You Will Need:

An altar or small table covered with a black cloth

One black candle

A glass or chalice filled with red wine

Patchouli incense

A plate filled with bread

Goat cheese

Smoked fish

The Wheel of Hecate symbol (pictured) inscribed with silver ink on black card stock (the wheel should be the size of a dessert or small dinner plate.)

To begin the rite, light the black candle as you say:

Mistress of Magick,
Great Hecate,
Let your Light
Now lead the way.
 

Set the plate of food on top of the Wheel of Hecate. Hold your hands over the food and ask Hecate to bless it as follows:

I summon thee by Witches Rune,
Waxing light and Waning Moon.
With the turning of the tide,
All that’s past be laid aside.
Threefold Goddess of the night,
Bless me from the shadows light.
Banish now all trouble and fear,
Bring me happiness for all the year.
 

You will now want to bless the wine by holding your hands over the chalice or glass of wine as you say:

Let now the knowledge of the light,
Bring me wisdom and inner sight.
For all that was, has now passed away,
That new beginnings shall come my way.
 

In honor of Hecate, eat a portion of food and drink some of the wine. Take a few moments to reflect on the rite, and then extinguish the black candle as you say:

O glorious Hecate your are my power
Bless me my Lady from this hour.
 

To ensure that Hecate will bless you in the coming year, you must now take the remaining food and wine to the nearest crossroads and leave it. Place the food in the center of the crossroads and pour the wine over it. As you do this, ask Hecate to bless you. When you return home, clear the altar, and hang the Wheel of Hecate over your altar or bed.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities, Ritual Working, The Goddesses | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Celebrating Spiritual 365 Days A Year – Feast of Hecate

Witchy Cat Graphics & Comments

Celebrating Spiritual 365 Days A Year – Feast of Hecate

Hecate is one of the oldest embodiments of the Triple Moon Goddess worshipped today. She holds power over the heavens, the earth and the underworld, where she is in control of birth, life and death. Hecate is the giver of visions, magick, and regeneration. Her chief symbol is the crossroads where all paths connect—the past where one has been, the present where one stands, and future where one is headed. In ancient Rome, statues of Hecate were place at the important crossroads. Those who frequently traveled would make offerings to the Goddess in return for her blessings.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

May the Goddess Bless You With Warmth & Comfort on this Wednesday!

Blessed Be Comments

Faith is the Dark Moon
Unseen in the night
We know it is present
Yet long for the light.
 
Faith is the wind
That whispers around us.
 
We cannot touch it
And must take it on trust.
 
Faith is the soft voice
Of the Goddess of Old
Who warms us in the Winter
And wards off the cold.
 
Let my heart feel the warmth
Let my soul hear Her voice
Let me find faith in the darkness
And my spirit rejoice.
 

So Mote It Be.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Calendar of the Sun for Monday, January 27th

Calendar of the Sun
27 Wolfmonath
Day of the Dioscuri

Color: Blue
Element: Air
Altar: Upon a cloth of blue place two blue candles, two red candles, two figures of horses, to small mirrors, and four knives, one before each candle. Place there also four cups, one containing white wine, one containing red wine, one containing grape juice, and one containing bitter tea.
Offering: Meditate on your inner divisions.
Daily Meal: Poultry.

Invocation to the Dioscuri

Hear ye the story of the Dioscuri, the sacred twins:
Leda, Queen of Sparta, opened herself to her lawful husband,
Tyndareus of Sparta, and also to great Zeus, king of the Gods.
She bore two sets of twins, and of each pair
One was mortal, and the other a divine child.
Castor, son of Zeus, loved his brother,
Pollux son of Tyndareus, with a love that could not separate them,
And Pollux returned that love. Each protected the other’s life,
As it should be between the mortal and immortal part
Of any being. Yet Pollux was stricken, slain, brought down,
As will come about for anything mortal, and went to Hades.
Therefore did Castor grieve, and offered up half his right to Olympus,
So that both spend half their time in the darkness, and half in heaven.
Yet hear the tale of the other twins: Helen the beautiful
Scorned her plain mortal sister Clytemnestra,
Saw her married at twelve, widowed at thirteen,
Raped on the bed beside her murdered babe,
Locked in a tower by her second husband
To prove as brood mare, whilst Helen, fairer of face
Than any mortal woman, went from prince to prince,
Fought over like a proud jewel. Yet the abused sister
Overthrew her oppressors, chose her own mate, turned a kingdom
Back to the ways of old before her death, whilst Helen
Was slain by raging mortal woman, like the sister she had scorned.
And so it is: The Divine and mortal parts must love each other,
More than life itself, and learn to work together,
And be prepared to sacrifice, or both shall be ever lost.

(The four cups are poured out as libation, first the white wine and the grape juice for Castor and Pollux, then the red wine and bitter tea for Helen and Clytemnestra.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blue Magick

Blue Magick

Wealth is not to be measured in terms of assets, but rather in terms of how much
control over people and material, and thus ultimately one’s own experiences, one
achieves by economic activities. Money is an abstract concept used to quantify
economic activity, thus wealth is a measure of how well you control your
experiences with money. Assuming that varied, exciting, unusual and stimulating experiences are preferable to dull ones, and that they tend to be expensive for this reason, then the main problem for most people is to find a highly efficient form of money input which has the above agreeable qualities. The aim of wealth magic is to establish a large turnover of money which allows agreeable experiences at both the input and output stages. This demands what is called Money Consciousness.

Money has acquired all the characteristics of a “spiritual” being. It is
invisible and intangible, coinage, notes and electronic numbers are not money.
They are merely representations or talismans of something which economists
cannot coherently define. Yet although it is itself intangible and invisible it
can create powerful effects on reality. Money has its own personality and
idiosyncratic tastes, it avoids those who blaspheme it, and flows towards those
who treat it in the way it likes. In a suitable environment it will even
reproduce itself. The nature of the money spirit is movement, money likes to
move. If it is hoarded and not used, it slowly dies. Money thus prefers to
manifest as turnover rather than as unexploited assets. Monies surplus to
immediate pleasure should be re-invested as a further evocation, but the truly
money conscious find that even their pleasures make money for them. Money
consciousness gets paid to enjoy itself. Those in money consciousness are by
nature generous. Offer them an interesting investment and they will offer you a
fortune. Just don’t ask for small cash handouts.

The attainment of money consciousness and the invocation of the Wealth-self
consists of the acquisition of a thorough knowledge of the predilections of the
spirit of money and a thorough exploration of personal desires. When both of
these have been understood, real wealth manifests effortlessly.

Such invocations must be handled with care. The blue gnosis of wealth and desire creates demons as easily as gods. Many contemporary success and sales seminars concentrate on creating an hysterical desire for money coupled with an equally hypertrophied desire for the mere symbols of wealth rather than the experiences the punters actually want. To work like a possessed maniac all day for the questionable pleasure of drinking oneself into near oblivion on vintage
champagne every night, is to have missed the point entirely and to have a
entered a condition of anti-wealth.

However, the majority of those who are poor in relatively free societies where
others are rich, owe their poverty either to a lack of understanding of how
money behaves, or to negative feelings which tend to repel it. Neither
intelligence nor investment capital are required in any great degree to become
wealthy. The popularity of tales about the misery and misfortunes of the rich is
testimony to the ridiculous myth prevalent amongst the poor, that the rich are
unhappy. Before beginning works of blue magic it is essential to seriously
examine all negative thoughts and feelings about money and to exorcise them.
Most of the poor people who win in lotteries, and only the poor regularly enter
them, manage to have nothing to show for it a couple years later. It is as if
some subconscious force somehow got rid of something they felt they did not
really deserve or want. People tend to have the degree of wealth that they
deeply believe they should have. Blue magic is the modification of that belief
through ritual enactment of alternative beliefs.

Blue magic rituals may thus involve exorcism of negative attitudes to wealth,
divinatory explorations of one’s deepest desires, and invocations of the Wealth-
self and the spirit of money during which the subconscious wealth level is
adjusted by ritual expression of a new value, and affirmations of new projects
for the investment of resources and effort are made. Hymns and incantations to
money can be delivered. Cheques for startling sums can be written to oneself
and desires can be proclaimed and visualised. Various traditional god forms with
a prosperity aspect can be used to express the Wealth-self such as Jupiter, Zeus
and the mythical Midas and Croesus.

Simple money spells are rarely used in modern blue magic. The tendency nowadays is to cast spells designed to enhance schemes designed to make money. If one fails to provide a mechanism through which money can manifest then either nothing will happen or the spell will flesh by strange means, such as a legacy from the untimely death of a much beloved relative for example. Serious blue magic is never attempted by conventional forms of gambling. Conventional
gambling is an expensive way of buying experiences which have nothing to do with increasing one’s wealth. Blue magic is a matter of carefully calculated
investment. Anyone but a fool should be able to devise an investment that offers
better odds than conventional forms of gambling.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Divination | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,999 other followers