Posts Tagged With: Women’s Book of Healing

VESUVIANITE

VESUVIANITE (IDOCRASE)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Vesuvianite is composed of calcium, magnesium
and aluminum silicate, often with some beryllium and fluorine. The
chemistry is Ca10Mg2Al4(SiO4)5(Si2)7)2(OH)4. Specimens range from brown
and green to a rare yellow or blue. The hardness is 6-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Vesuvianite forms by igneous and metamorphic processes. It
commonly is metamorphic and occurs with grossular, wollastonite, and
calcite in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks; with chromite and
magnetite in serpentinite of hydrothermal metamorphic rocks; and with
wollastonite, andradite, and diopside in carbonatites.

OCCURENCE: Gem-quality Vesuvianite has been obtained from a pegmatite in
marble near Sixteen Island Lake, Laurel, Argenteuil Co., Quebec, and
beautiful micromount cyrstals of purplish-pink color occur in massive
Vesuvianite at the Montral chrome pit at Black Lake, Megantic Co.,
Quebec. The blue variety called [cyprine] has been obtained at Franklin,
Sussex Co., New Jersey. Fine crystals up to 1-1/2 inches across occur in
pale-blue calcite at Scratch Gravel, near Helena, Lewis and Clark Co.,
Montana, and spectacular material of similar nature occurs at quarries
near Riverside, California. Beautiful pale-green massive Vesuvianite
([californite]) occurs in California at Pulga, Butte Co.,
and near Happy Camp, Siskiyou Co., and crude yellow prismatic crystals
occur with grossular at Xalostoc, Morelos, and Lake Jaco, Chihuahua,
Mexico.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Translucent gray to green or nearly colorless
Vesuvianite with green streaks is called [californite], and is often
sold as “California Jade.” Californite is fashioned into cabochons.
Principal sources are the USSR, Italy, Canada and California.

NAME: The name “Vesuvianite” is from the original locality at Mt.
Vesuvius, Italy. The alternate name, “idocrase,” comes from the Greek
[eidos,] “form”, and [krasis,] “mixture,” because Vesuvianite may appear
to combine the crystal forms of several other minerals.

LEGEND and LORE: None found.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Dolfyn associates this stone with Passion, enthus-
iasm, warmth and devotion.

HEALING: No specific information found, other than what Dolfyn states.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: None. I do not have a specimen of Vesuvianite.

——-bibliography——-
1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from)”The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.
2. Other scientific information may be from “Simon & Schuester’s Guide
to Gems and Precious Stones”.
3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.
4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s
Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.
6. Some magical and healing information from “Crystal Wisdom, Spiritual
Properties of Crystals and Gemstones” by Dolfyn.
7. More legends and lore may come from “Stone Power” by Dorothee L.
Mella.
8. Healing information is from “The Women’s Book of Healing”, by Diane
Stein.
9. Additional healing information may be from “The Occult and Curative
Powers of Precious Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.
10. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and
notebooks.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GARNET (GROSSULAR)

GARNET (GROSSULAR)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION:  Grossular Garnets are from a group of very
closely related calcium silicates. The Chemistry for the Grossular
variety is Ca3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from yellow, pink
and brown through white and colorless. The hardness ranges between 6-1/2
and 7-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Grossular occurs with wollastonite, calcite, and vesuviani-
te in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks.

OCCURENCE: Being the commonest of all garnets, it is found in a variety
of locations. Fine colorless crystals up to 1/2″ across occur in
Gatineau and Magantic Cos., Quebec, fine lusterous pale brown crystals
up to 3″ across were found near Minot, Androscoggin Co., Main, and
beautiful white and pick crystals up to 4″ across have been found near
Xalostoc, Morelos, Mexico.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Grossular also has the typical crystal form of
garnets, occuring in isolated crystals which are often complete, in the
shape of a rhombic dodecahedron, sometimes combined with a trapezo-
hedron. They vary from transparent to semiopaque. The typical color is
light (gooseberry) yellowish green; but they can be a strong to bluish
green, honey yellow or pinkish yellow, or even colorless. When transpar-
ent, the crystals have good luster.  Like other garnets, they have no
cleavage. The greenish to yellowish varieties are used as gems.
Grossular is not a rare mineral. The types used as gems mainly come from
the gem gravels of Sri Lanka (honey yellow variety); the the United
States, Canada, Mexico, Madagascar, Kenya. The green variety of
grossular garnet, discovered a few decades ago and found mainly in
Kenya, near the Tsavo National Park, is also known as Tsavorite (or
Tsavolite) It is a light, verdant, or dark green, similar to the color
of the better green tourmalines and sometimes, it is said, even
comparable to African emerald. It has good luster. These gems, which are
usually given a round or pear-shaped mixed cut, or occasionally a
brilliant cut, are generally small, rarely exceeding one carat and never
more than a few carats.

NAME: Grossular is from the New Latin [grosssularia,] “gooseberry,”
because some Grossular crystals are pale green like the fruit.

LEGEND and LORE: I do not find anything referring specifically to yellow
or green garnets in my sources.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: While deep red garnets focus on “Will” and orange–
red garnets focus on “Desire”, yellow garnets are focused on Personal
Power and Personality. In addition they are (because of their color)
associated with athletic prowess and Oriental philosophies.

HEALING: Being linked to the Solar Plexus Chakra, yellow garnets are
energizing. They can be used for the digestive organs, the diaphram (and
the breath) and eyesight. Green garnets center their healing on the
Heart Chakra.

NOTES: Garnets are used in industry as an abrasive.

                      ——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Other scientific information may be from “Simon & Schuester’s Guide
to Gems and Precious Stones”.

3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.

4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.

5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s
Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from “ccrystal Wisdom,
Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones” by Dolfyn.

7. More legends and lore may come from “Stone Power” by Dorothee L.
Mella.

8. Healing information is from “The Women’s Book of Healing”, by Diane
Stein.

9. Additional healing information may be from “The Occult and Curative
Powers
of Precious Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GARNET (SPESSARTINE)

GARNET (SPESSARTINE)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION:  Spessartine Garnets are from a group of very
closely related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Spessartine
variety is Mn3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from brownish red
to hyacinth-red.  The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and 7-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Spessartine occurs with albite and muscovite in granite
pegmatites and with quartz and riebeckite in blue schist or regional
metamorphic rocks..

OCCURENCE: Large corroded crystals of Spessartine have come from the
Rutherford No. 2 Mine, Amelia, Amelia Co., Virginia; crystals up to 1″
in diameter have been found in several pegmatites in the Ramona
District, San Diego Co., California; sharp, dark-red, well-formed
crystals occur in cavities in rhyolite near Ely, White Pine C., Nevada;
and brilliant crystals of Spessartine have been found with topaz at Ruby
Mt., near Nathrop, Chaffee Co., Colorado. Gem material comes from the
gem gravels of Sri Lanka and Burma. It is also found in Brazil and
Madagascar.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: The gem variety of Spessartine Garnet is uncommon.
It tends to be midway between spessartine and almandine in composition.
The “aurora red”, orange-red or orange-pink color is typical. It has
good transparency and considerable luster. It is normally given a mixed,
round, or oval cut. The weight does not normally exceed a few carats.
Gems of about 10 carats are extremely rare and usually of an atypical,
rather dark, unattactive color.

NAME: Spessartine is named after an occurrence in the spessart district,
Bavaria, Germany.

LEGEND and LORE: In the 13th century garnets were thought to repel
insect stings. A magical treatise, “The Book of Wings”, dating from the
thirteenth century says “The well-formed image of a lion, if engraved on
a garnet, will protect and preserve honors and health, cures the wearer
of all diseases, brings him honors, and guards him from all perils in
traveling.”

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Spessartine is normally considered to be red-orange
to orange-pink. Thus it links the “will” with the “desire”. It is a good
stone to use when casting a spell for your “heart’s desire”, especially
if it is of the orange-pink” variety.
HEALING: The orange garnets are linked to the root and the belly chakra.
They are beneficial in instances of infertility, dealing with reproduc-
tive organs. Mentally, it inspires confidence in personal creativity and
self-worth.

                      ——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Other scientific information may be from “Simon & Schuester’s Guide
to Gems and Precious Stones”.

3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.

4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.

5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s
Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from “ccrystal Wisdom,
Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones” by Dolfyn.

7. More legends and lore may come from “Stone Power” by Dorothee L.
Mella.

8. Healing information is from “The Women’s Book of Healing”, by Diane
Stein.

9. Additional healing information may be from “The Occult and Curative
Powers of Precious Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GARNET (ALMANDINE)

GARNET (ALMANDINE)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION:  Almandine Garnets are from a group of very
closely related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Almandine
variety is Fe2/3+Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from deep red
to brown and brownish black. The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and
7-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Almandine occurs in diorite of plutonic rocks, and with
andalusite, hornblende, and biotite in hornfels and schist of contact
and regional metamorphic rocks.

OCCURENCE: Well-formed crystals of Almandine have come from Wrangell, SE
Alaska; from Emerald Creek, Benewah Co., Idaho; and from Michigamme,
Michigan.  Gemstone quality material is obtained in large quantities
from Sri Lanka and India, where it is also cut; other sources are Burma,
Brazil, Madagascar, Tanzania, and Australia.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Most red garnets come under the name Almandine,
even when their composition is midway between that of Pyrope and
Almandine and similar, in many cases, to that of Rhodolite. The reason
for this is the similarity in their color and absorption spectrum
characteristics. Almandine has a brilliant luster, but its transparency
is frequently marred, even in very clear stones, by excessive depth of
color. The cabochon cut is widely used, often being given a strongly
convex shape and sometimes a concave base, in an effort to lighten
the color by reducing the thickness. Rose cuts have also been used,
particularly in the past. Nowdays, when the material is quite transpare-
nt, faceted cuts are used as well, and sometimes square or rectangular
step cuts.  Gems of several carats are not uncommon. Faceted or even
barely rounded pieces of Almandine, pierced as necklace beads, were very
common in the recent past, but are now considered old-fashioned.

NAME: The name Almandine comes from [carbunculus alabandicus,] after the
city of Alabanda in Asia Minor, where gems were traded at the time of
Pliny theElder.

LEGEND and LORE: All red Garnet has long been associated with love,
passion, sensuality and sexuality. Garnet is considered a birthstone for
those born in January:

“By her in January born
No gem save Garnets should be worn;
They will ensure her constancy,
True friendship, and fidelity.”

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: The darker Garnets are associated with the Will and
the Source of Life Incarnate. This is who and what we are in this
lifetime. This stone is worn for protective purposes, and is thought to
drive off demons and phantoms.

HEALING: Almandine Garnets are used to heal skin conditions associated
with poor circulation. They improve vigor, strength and endurance.

                      ——-bibliography——-
1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.
2. Other scientific information may be from “Simon & Schuester’s Guide
to Gems and Precious Stones”.
3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.
4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s
Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.
6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from “ccrystal Wisdom,
Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones” by Dolfyn.
7. More legends and lore may come from “Stone Power” by Dorothee L.
Mella.
8. Healing information is from “The Women’s Book of Healing”, by Diane
Stein.
9. Additional healing information may be from “The Occult and Curative
Powers of Precious Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

GARNET (PYROPE)

GARNET (PYROPE)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Pyrope Garnets are from a group of very closely
related aluminum silicates. The Chemistry for the Pyrope variety is
Mg3Al2Si3O12. These Garnets range in color from deep red to reddish
black and on rare occasions from purple and rose to pale purplish red
(sometimes called [rhodolite].) The hardness ranges between 6-1/2 and
7-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Pyrope occurs with olivine and hypersthene in peridotite of
plutonic rocks.

OCCURENCE: Pyrope Garnets occur in peridotite in Kentucky, Arkansas,
Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. In the latter half of the nineteenth
century, most Pyrope came from Bohemia, where it is still found today.
The main sources nowadays, however, are South Africa, Zimbabwe,
Tanzania, the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Australia.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: The garnet species with red or purple varieties,
including Pyrope are considered gemstones. Usually bright red, Pyrope
can be a much less attractive brick or dark red. It can be perfectly
transparent, but this feature is less visible in dark specimens. It is
either made into fairly convex cabochons, or faceted, with an oval or
round mixed cut or, more rarely, a step cut. The faceted gems have good
luster, rather less obvious in cabochons. The most valuable types are,
of course, the transparent ones with the brightest red color. Pyrope is
relatively common, although less so than almandine. Very large stones,
up to several hundred carats have been found; but these are rare and are
found in museums and famous collections.

NAME: The name comes from the Greek [pyropos,] meaning “fiery.” The name
“Garnet” comes from the Latin [granatus,] meaning “seed-like”.

LEGEND and LORE: Pyrope Garnet has long been associated with love,
passion, sensuality and sexuality. Some Asiatic tribes used red garnets
as bullets for sling bows because they pierced their victims quickly,
and could not be seen well in the body when they mingled with the blood.
2612

Throughout the ages, Pyrope has been used as a curative for all types of
ailments dealing with blood.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Pyrope is directly linked with the Will. As such, it
is a strong stone for the Magician and Shaman. It is associated with
Fire and Mars, Strength and Protection. It will help the practitioner
tap into extra energy for ritualistic purposes.

HEALING: While all Garnets are associated with the Root Chakra, Pyrope
is particularly symbolic. It is used for healing when the subject
involved has “lost the will to live”, since it is directly related to
the desire to live and achieve in this lifetime. This stone warms and
aids blood circulation, rouses sexuality and heals the reproductive
system and the heart.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: If you are already a strong willed individual or
have a fiery temper that you need to learn to control, I suggest that
you work with the Alamandine Garnets, rather than the Pyropes. This is
a good stone to use for treating depression. Very often, when I’ve
“worked” on an individual who has suffered a heart attack, I find that
the individual is rather severely depressed (which I think is a side
effect of the medication) and has lost the will to continue in this
lifetime. I’ve found that fiery red Pyrope Garnets are a great help in
this situation.

ADDITIONAL NOTES: The Latin name [carbunculus,] (small coal or ember),
is attributed to all red transparent stones. It is more often applied to
Pyropes when they are formed into cabochons than any other stone.

——-bibliography——-
1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audubon Society field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.
2. Other scientific information may be from “Simon & Schuester’s Guide
to Gems and Precious Stones”.
3. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.
4. Other precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.
5. Basic Legends, Lore and Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s
Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.
6. Other Magical and Healing information may come from “ccrystal Wisdom,
Spiritual Properties of Crystals and Gemstones” by Dolfyn.
7. More legends and lore may come from “Stone Power” by Dorothee L.
Mella.
8. Healing information is from “The Women’s Book of Healing”, by Diane
Stein.
9. Additional healing information may be from “The Occult and Curative
Powers of Precious Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,338 other followers