Posts Tagged With: Winter solstice

Your I Ching Hexagram for June 17th is 24: Returning

24: Returning

Tuesday, Jun 17th, 2014

hexagram09

 

 

 

 

 

There is a turning point that recharges you and eventually brings success. This hexagram is associated with a turning back of long nights towards more light, the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year, the seasonal change when our hours of daily light begin to increase again. This is the beginning of a turnaround; a time of letting go of the old and making way for the new; a time of new beginnings. Ironically, it all starts with rest.

Don’t move too fast. The new momentum is just beginning; the turn-around demands that your energy be recharged by adequate rest, so that your life force will not be spent prematurely. This principle of hibernation, of allowing energy to renew itself and be strengthened by rest applies to many situations — recuperation after an illness, the slow return of trust after period of estrangement, the careful development of new relationships after a splitting apart of old ones.

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Equinoxes, Solstices and Astrology

Equinoxes, Solstices and Astrology

Learn all about the fresh-start feeling you get with each new season

Maria DeSimone   Maria DeSimone on the topics of solstice, equinox, astrology

Have you ever wondered about the meaning of an equinox or solstice and how they tie into Astrology? Not surprisingly, there’s a major significance to these periods of time and they each have something in common. An equinox or solstice tells us about our relationship here on Earth to the Sun at any given season.

That’s right … the first thing to remember about an equinox or solstice is that they mark the beginning of a new season. There are two equinox points each year (spring and autumn) and two solstice points (summer and winter). They each correspond to one of the four Cardinal signs of the zodiac — also known as the Cardinal axis. This axis is extremely important in Astrology because it is where we find the powerful angles in a birth chart. These angles are points of energy manifestation. They are highly sensitive points in your chart that trigger every major life event.  Each of these points on the Cardinal axis will correlate to one of the four cardinal directions (north, south, east, west).

Let’s dig into the astronomy and Astrology behind solstices and equinoxes so that you can understand more about their implication for our life and our planet!

The Summer and Winter Solstices

By definition, a solstice is an astronomical event that happens twice a year — once at the beginning of winter and again at the start of summer. During a solstice, the Sun will reach its highest or lowest point relative to the celestial equator. The celestial equator is a fancy term for the giant imaginary circle that’s on the same plane as our equator. The word solstice literally means “Sun stands still,” and that’s exactly what appears to happen during a solstice point from our perspective here on Earth.

During the Summer Solstice, the Sun will appear to stop and then begin declining in the slightest way each day in a southward direction. The date of the Summer Solstice marks the longest day of the year because at that point the Sun stops right over the Tropic of Cancer which is the northernmost point. After a few days it will backtrack south towards the equator. The Solstice occurs on June 21 and astrologically, it coincides with the start of the Cardinal sign Cancer.

The Winter Solstice, on the other hand, occurs when the Sun appears to stand still at the southernmost point of the equator (the Tropic of Capricorn) and then slowly begins to trek north again. The Winter Solstice occurs on December 21 and marks the shortest day of the year. Astrologically, it coincides with the start of the Cardinal zodiac sign Capricorn. From a soul perspective, the Winter Solstice is about celebrating the rebirth of life in all forms. From here on out, the days will get longer and the Sun will shine brighter. Hope is renewed.

The Spring and Fall Equinoxes

In contrast, an equinox occurs when the tilt of the Earth’s axis is neither away or towards the Sun. At this time, the center of the Sun is in the plane of the Earth’s equator. What happens as a result is that the Sun is at one of two opposite points on the celestial sphere. The word equinox is translated in Latin to mean “equal night” because during an equinox the day and night will be at equal length.

The Spring Equinox begins on March 21 and marks the start of the new astrological year in the tropical zodiac since the Sun will enter Aries — the first sign in the zodiac. This is typically a time of new beginnings and we have come to associate the Spring Equinox with a “fresh start.”

The Fall Equinox occurs when the Sun reaches the opposite balancing point in its path through the tropical zodiac. Once again, the day and night are of about equal length during this time. This occurs on September 21 and correlates to the sign Libra. This time of year has become connected to “harvest” and reaping the fruits of our labor. At the same time, it brings up a certain respect for the fact that now, nights will become longer and it’s time to conserve energy and resources.

Cardinal signs bring life

An important point to note is that the seasonal relationship to solstices and equinoxes specifically apply to the Northern Hemisphere. Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere are reversed.

Either way, it’s no accident that the zodiac signs correlated to equinoxes and solstices are all Cardinal signs. Cardinal signs begin each season and are associated with qualities of initiative. Whether it’s an equinox or solstice, we’re celebrating the start of something new. Each season has a specific and essential job that we rely on for our very existence. The equinox and solstice points are sacred markers in time that help us connect the dots to the mystery behind the Earth’s never ending circle of life.

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Equinoxes, Solstices and Astrology

Equinoxes, Solstices and Astrology

Learn all about the fresh-start feeling you get with each new season

Maria DeSimone  Maria DeSimone on the topics of solstice, equinox, astrology

Have you ever wondered about the meaning of an equinox or solstice and how they tie into Astrology? Not surprisingly, there’s a major significance to these periods of time and they each have something in common. An equinox or solstice tells us about our relationship here on Earth to the Sun at any given season.

That’s right … the first thing to remember about an equinox or solstice is that they mark the beginning of a new season. There are two equinox points each year (spring and autumn) and two solstice points (summer and winter). They each correspond to one of the four Cardinal signs of the zodiac — also known as the Cardinal axis. This axis is extremely important in Astrology because it is where we find the powerful angles in a birth chart. These angles are points of energy manifestation. They are highly sensitive points in your chart that trigger every major life event. Each of these points on the Cardinal axis will correlate to one of the four cardinal directions (north, south, east, west).

Let’s dig into the astronomy and Astrology behind solstices and equinoxes so that you can understand more about their implication for our life and our planet!

The Summer and Winter Solstices

By definition, a solstice is an astronomical event that happens twice a year — once at the beginning of winter and again at the start of summer. During a solstice, the Sun will reach its highest or lowest point relative to the celestial equator. The celestial equator is a fancy term for the giant imaginary circle that’s on the same plane as our equator. The word solstice literally means “Sun stands still,” and that’s exactly what appears to happen during a solstice point from our perspective here on Earth.

During the Summer Solstice, the Sun will appear to stop and then begin declining in the slightest way each day in a southward direction. The date of the Summer Solstice marks the longest day of the year because at that point the Sun stops right over the Tropic of Cancer which is the northernmost point. After a few days it will backtrack south towards the equator. The Solstice occurs on June 21 and astrologically, it coincides with the start of the Cardinal sign Cancer.

The Winter Solstice, on the other hand, occurs when the Sun appears to stand still at the southernmost point of the equator (the Tropic of Capricorn) and then slowly begins to trek north again. The Winter Solstice occurs on December 21 and marks the shortest day of the year. Astrologically, it coincides with the start of the Cardinal zodiac sign Capricorn. From a soul perspective, the Winter Solstice is about celebrating the rebirth of life in all forms. From here on out, the days will get longer and the Sun will shine brighter. Hope is renewed.

The Spring and Fall Equinoxes

In contrast, an equinox occurs when the tilt of the Earth’s axis is neither away or towards the Sun. At this time, the center of the Sun is in the plane of the Earth’s equator. What happens as a result is that the Sun is at one of two opposite points on the celestial sphere. The word equinox is translated in Latin to mean “equal night” because during an equinox the day and night will be at equal length.

The Spring Equinox begins on March 21 and marks the start of the new astrological year in the tropical zodiac since the Sun will enter Aries — the first sign in the zodiac. This is typically a time of new beginnings and we have come to associate the Spring Equinox with a “fresh start.”

The Fall Equinox occurs when the Sun reaches the opposite balancing point in its path through the tropical zodiac. Once again, the day and night are of about equal length during this time. This occurs on September 21 and correlates to the sign Libra. This time of year has become connected to “harvest” and reaping the fruits of our labor. At the same time, it brings up a certain respect for the fact that now, nights will become longer and it’s time to conserve energy and resources.

Cardinal signs bring life

An important point to note is that the seasonal relationship to solstices and equinoxes specifically apply to the Northern Hemisphere. Seasons in the Southern Hemisphere are reversed.

Either way, it’s no accident that the zodiac signs correlated to equinoxes and solstices are all Cardinal signs. Cardinal signs begin each season and are associated with qualities of initiative. Whether it’s an equinox or solstice, we’re celebrating the start of something new. Each season has a specific and essential job that we rely on for our very existence. The equinox and solstice points are sacred markers in time that help us connect the dots to the mystery behind the Earth’s never ending circle of life.

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The Seasons, 2014

The  Seasons, 2014
 
Vernal Equinox  (Spring begins) March 20th at 11:57 morning.
Sun on Equator,  crosses the line North, enters the sign of Aries.
 
Summer Solstice  (Summer begins) June 21st at 5:49 morning.
Sun Runs High, at  Northern tropic (turn), enters the sign of Crabba.
 
Autumnal Equinox  (Fall begins) September 22nd at 9:28 evening.
Sun on Equator,  crosses the line South, enters the sign of Libra.
 
Winter Solstice  (Winter begins) December 21st at 6:01 evening.
Sun Rides Low, at  Southern tropic (turn), enters the sign of Capricorn.
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The year is divided into  four seasons;
  The first season is  of a frigid complexion, and this is “Winter”;
The second is of the  complexion of Air, and this is “Spring”;
  Then follows the  third, which is “Summer”, and is of the complexion of Fire;
Lastly, there is the  fourth, wherein fruits are matured, which is “Autumn”.
~The Turba Philosophorum,  ca. 12 century.
Straight from
GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast
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Prayer for Imbolc

Imbolc/Candlemas Comments
Prayer for Imbolc

On this Imbolc day, as I kindle the flame upon my hearth,
I pray that the flame of Brigid may burn in my soul,
and the souls of all I meet today.

I pray that no envy and malice,
no hatred or fear, may smother the flame.
I pray that indifference and apathy,
contempt and pride,
may not pour like cold water on the flame.

Instead, may the spark of Brigid light the love in my soul,
that it may burn brightly through this season.
And may I warm those that are lonely,
whose hearts are cold and lifeless,
so that all may know the comfort of Brigid’s love.

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Imbolc: A Midwinter Festival

Imbolc: A Midwinter Festival

Spring is stirring just beneath the surface at Imbolc, a Wiccan holiday when we anticipate the earth’s rebirth.

BY: Kaatryn MacMorgan

On January 31st, many Wiccans, practitioners of the religion of Modern Wicca, will celebrate Imbolc, a midwinter festival halfway between the beginning of winter, at the Winter Solstice, and the beginning of spring, at the Spring Equinox in March. The actual date of Imbolc varies within the many sects of Wicca, falling as early as January 29th and as late as February 3rd, but like all Wiccan holidays, it begins the moment the sun sets and ends just before sunset on the following day.

Wiccan holidays celebrate transitions, the passage from spring to summer, and from winter to spring, for example, so it is not surprising that the name of this holiday, also called Imbolg, the feast of Brighid, and the Calends of February, found its way into Wicca from its native Celtic peoples. Of course, it is not only the Wiccans who have decided to honor this holiday, as its main focus–the change from winter to spring–is most assuredly the point of our secular “Groundhog Day.”

The ancient Romans, Celts, Greeks, Chinese and many Native Americans all have similar holidays at this time of year, and many Reconstructionist, followers of ancient religions being resurrected through a combination of faith, scholastic research and imagination, practice Imbolc in forms far closer to the originals than the modern holiday practiced in Wicca.

For Wiccans the holiday is a break from the gloom of winter, a macroscopic version of the Wednesday parties that celebrate having more of the workweek behind you than before you. It is the day when spring begins to appear like the light at the end of a long tunnel, not really perceptible at first, but affecting the earth nonetheless.

Though we can’t see it through the cover of white, at Imbolc we know the spring bulbs have sent runners into the earth, that the ice floes on our lakes and rivers have begun to thin and move, and that the first of the young animals due in spring have been born. Many Wiccans celebrate this holiday as a group by standing in a dark room, with one small candle flame lighting their way, each Wiccan then lights their candle from that flame, until everyone in the room is bathed in the great light of their community’s bounty. Prayers are said for a gentle spring, and that stores of food and money, greatly depleted by the festivities of the winter solstice, last long enough to be supplemented by the first crops.

It is a holiday of preparedness. The houses of Wiccans are scrubbed floor to ceiling, bills are paid, and taxes are filed, so that none of the business of the winter interferes with the pure joy of the earth’s rebirth. When this has been done, we determine, by logic, by divination, or just an educated guess, what will not last until spring, or what excess is present in our houses. These things become a great feast, in my house, a huge kettle of “stone soup,” soup made by what is brought to it by those that would eat it. We share together in this great pot of soup, complete with a version of the stone soup story and send everyone home with a jar of it as a reminder of how the simplest things can become fantastic with the addition of one magic ingredient–community.

—beliefnet

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Eyes of the Wolf Spell

Eyes of the Wolf Spell

(Wolf Moon)
As the first full moon after the winter solstice or Yule, the Wolf Moon is one of the most important of the high moons. A  full moon occurs when the sun and the moon are aligned on opposite sides of the earth. This alignment of the two celestial bodies has a strong effect on the  earth. This alignment of the two celestial bodies has a strong effect on the earth, producing a time when energy is high. This is why full moon rituals can  be incredibly powerful times for doing magick.
When looking through the eyes of the wolf, the idea is to perceive the true nature of people, events and experiences.  Expand your perception and awareness using the instincts of the wolf. The wolf is part of a pack that use their knowledge and wits to survive a time when the  earth is cold and barren.
This is also when new patterns are conceived, setting the stage for what is to come. This is also the ideal time for  foretelling the future, clairvoyance, and divination practices.
At midnight, begin by drawing a circle of light. This is done by standing at your altar and pounding the stick end of  your wand on the altar nine times. Pick up you athame and point it toward the north point of your circle. Starting and ending in the north, draw a magickal  circle of light clockwise around the circle. Next, call in the elements of earth, air, fire and water.
Standing in the middle of the circle, call in the powers of the wolf:
“On this full moon night at this hour
I call now upon the ancient animal powers
To guide me in the ways of the wolf
Where instinct and wit prevail
Through darkness, wind, rain and hail
I am the wolf, the wolf is me
So be it! Blessed be!
As you enjoy your evening, imagine seeing through the eyes of the wolf. Imagine dreaming with the eyes of the wolf. In  the morning pull up the circle and thank the elements. Also than the wolf for its guidance and power.
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Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Midvintersblot

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year

January 13 and 14

Midvintersblot/Saint Hilary’s Day

Midvintersblot or Midwinter’s offering, from called Tiugunde Day in Old England, was sacred to Tiu, the ancient Teutonic Chief God and ruler of the year. This festival falls 20 days after Yule and is when the runic half-month of Peorth commences.

This day was christened as Saint Hilary’s Day (for Hilary of Poitiers), the patron of backward children, who was invoked against snake bites. This time is traditionally the coldest point of the year and marks the time when marriages were once again permitted after the Christmas season

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