Posts Tagged With: Wicca

What is Draconic Wicca?

What is Draconic Wicca?

 

Draconic Wicca is the utilization of the powers of the dragons. There are as many dragons as there are people. They are as varied as humans are also. We work with these dragons to achieve the results that we seek. In doing so, we have to deal with the unique personalities of each type of dragon. The dragons have no real hierarchy other than age, except for the case of ‘The Dragon’.

The Dragon is the combined powers of the God and the Goddess. The Dragon is invoked or evoked during Sabbats and in times when great magick is needed (not when you can not find your keys). Invoking means to call into you the power of the dragon that you name i.e. a fire dragon. You ask that this dragon assume himself/herself into your spiritual body. To evoke means to call a dragon to you, to join you in your magickal workings.

The reason it is called Draconin “Wicca” is because of the similarities to the wiccan religion of today. This religion was originally brought to Earth by the blessed races when Atlantis was formed. The name of the religion itself cannot be pronounced in present English certainly not spelled. This religion was taken away from the Atlantians and Atlantis destroyed.The druids were the descendants of the Old Religion and passed on by mouth.

The spirits God: The god is the male half of the ‘divine being’. He has many faces and has known many names. To wiccans, he is known as the horned god, the sun god, and many more. God is not just Father, he is Mate, Consort, Lover, Friend, Brother, Hunter, Husband, Law-giver, and Partner.

Goddess: The goddess is the female half of the ‘divine being’. She also has had many faces and many names. Wiccans, druids, and the coven all respect the Maiden, Mother, and Crone aspect of the goddess show in the entire universe.

Red Dragon: The Red Dragon is effectively the goddess of the dragons and very, very few known her actual name. She represents all of the blessed races and has a counterpart for each. Dragons/Races of the

Elements: Each race has its own head keeper of the elements and/or directions. The elements are: Air, Earth, Fire, Water, Light, Darkness and Spirit These spirits are called in to help with specific elements and what the elements and directions can help with different things. Healing would be Earth for example.

Many names are used to invoke different aspects of the above spirits. The goddess might be invoked as Bast (Egyptian name) for example for healing and another time Athena (Greek) for wisdom. There is a good saying. “There are many faces of the one god.” However this doesn’t apply for the Red Dragon of other guardians of the elements. This mostly applies for the God and Goddess aspects. The sabbats are more like the old druidic sabbats, which any good reference is hard to find, than the ones that are found in Wiccan religions.

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WOTC Extra – The Self-dedication Ritual


Dragon Comments & Graphics

The Self-dedication Ritual

First, spend a few sunrises or late at night contemplating what you want to gain from Wicca. Write it down in your Mirror Book (This is like a journal that you keep about your thoughts about wicca, divination, or anything else you might want to put in such a journal). Second, think about what you wish to give to Wicca. This could be anything from connecting with other Wiccans on the Web to anything that cares for the Earth. Write this down in your Mirror Book. This done, you are ready to go to the next step of performing the actual ritual.

The Rite

Prepare a ritual bath and add some salt and a few drops of sandalwood or frankincense oil to it. If you have to use a shower, take a washcloth and put salt and oil on it, then rub it all over your body.

When you have finished your bath, dress comfortably to go to a secluded area outside. You can do this anywhere in the outdoor but you need to be in a place where you won’t be disturbed. All you need to take with you is some essential oil like sandalwood, frankincense, cinnamon, or any other you feel would be appropriate.

When you get to the place you have decided upon, take off your shoes and sit quietly on the ground. Sit until you are calm and relaxed feeling the Earth’s energies around you.

Then stand up and look out where you are and let the Deities draw you to the right place for the ritual.

When you have found the right place, sit down and set the oil on the ground beside you. Use deep breathing and relax yourself again, let the energies flow around and through you.

Call upon the Goddess and the God in your own way. Tell them what you desire and that you wish to dedicate yourself to the Wiccan way and to them. Ask them to fill you with their divine energy.  When you do this, you may feel a surge of energy or a peaceful feeling. Whatever happens you will know that the Deities have heard you. You will feel different.

After you have finished talking the the Lord and Lady, take some of the oil and draw the symbols for the Goddess and the God on you somewhere. Visualize the symbols glowing in white light and flowing into your body.

Thank the Deities and sit and quietly meditate on the experience before you leave.

It is done. Go home and celebrate your experience in some way. Share the excitement with any of your wiccan friends. It’s your celebration, so do it in your way.

The Goddess symbol- )O(
The God symbol-
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Let’s Talk Witch – Concerning Initiation


Dragon Comments & Graphics

Concerning Initiation

Most shamanic and magical religions utilize some sort of initiation ceremony whereby an outsider becomes a recognized member of the religion, society, group or coven. Such rites also mark the new direction which the initiate’s life is taking.

Much has been made, publicly and privately, of Wiccan initiations. Each Wiccan tradition uses their own initiation ceremonies, which may or may not be recognized by other Wiccans. On one point, however, most initiates agree: a person can be a Wiccan only if she or he has received such an initiation.

This brings up an interesting question: Who initiated the first Wiccan? Most initiation ceremonies are nothing more than rites marking the acceptance of the person into a coven, and her or his dedication to the Goddess and God. Sometimes “power is passed” between the initiator and neophyte as well.

To a non-Wiccan, the initiation might seem to be a rite of conversion. This isn’t the case. Wicca has no need for such rites. We don’t condemn the deities with which we may have attuned before practicing Wicca, nor need we turn our backs on them.

The initiation ceremony (or ceremonies, since in many groups three successive rites are performed) is held to be of utmost importance to those Wiccan groups still practicing ritual secrecy. Surely anyone entering such a group should undergo an initiation, part of which consists of swearing never to reveal their secrets. This makes sense, and is a part of many coven initiations. But it isn’t the essence of initiation.

Many people have told me that they desperately need to undergo Wiccan initiation. They seem to believe that one cannot practice Wicca without this stamp of approval. If you’ve read this far, you know that such isn’t the case.

Wicca has been, up until the past decade or so, a closed religion, but no more. The inner components of Wicca are available to anyone who can read and has the proper wit to understand the material. Wicca’s only secrets are its individual ritual forms, spells, names of deities and so on.

This needn’t bother you. For every secret Wiccan ritual or Goddess name there are dozens (if not hundreds) of others published and readily available. At this moment, more Wiccan information has been released than ever before. While it once may have been a secret religion, today Wicca is a religion with few secrets.

Still, many cling to the idea of the necessity of initiation, probably thinking that with this magical act they’ll be granted the secrets of the
universe and untold power. To make things worse, some particularly narrow-minded Wiccans say that the Goddess and God won’t listen to anyone who isn’t an athame-carrying member of a coven. Many would-be Wiccans believe this.

It doesn’t work this way.

True initiation isn’t a rite performed by one human being upon another. Even if you accept the concept that the initiator is suffused with deity during initiation, it’s still just a ritual.

Initiation is a process, gradual or instantaneous, of the individual’s attunement with the Goddess and God. Many of the Wicca readily admit that the ritual initiation is the outer form only. True initiation will often occur weeks or months later,
or prior to, the physical ritual.

Since this is so, “real” Wiccan initiation may take place years before the student contacts a Wiccan coven or teacher. Is this initiation less effective or less genuine because the person hasn’t gone through a formal ritual at the hands of another human being? Of course not.

Rest assured, it’s quite possible to experience a true Wiccan initiation without ever meeting another soul involved in the religion. You may even be unaware of it. Your life may gradually shift in focus until you realize that you notice the birds and clouds. You may gaze at the Moon on lonely nights and talk to plants and animals. Sunset might bring a time of quiet contemplation.

Or you may change as the seasons change, adapting your body’s energies to match those of the natural world around you. The Goddess and God may sing in your thoughts, and you may perform rituals before actually realizing what you’re doing.

When the Old Ways have become a part of your life and your relationship with the Goddess and God is strong, when you have gathered your tools and performed the rites and magic out of joy, you are truly of the spirit and can rightly call yourself “Wiccan.”

Finally words, Some say, “Only a Wiccan can make a Wiccan.” I say only the Goddess and God can make a Wiccan.

Who’s better qualified?

 

Source:
Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner
Scott Cunningham.

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Lessons Learned from Self-Teaching and from Teaching Others

Lessons Learned from Self-Teaching and from Teaching Others

Author: Trey Justice

I’m writing this article in response to the current topic of teaching and learning in our community. I have always been and still consider myself a solitary Wiccan. Despite my solitary status, I have participated in group teaching/lessons, group ritual, group exercise, and a few years ago, taught a person new to Wicca and helped guide her on her own solitary path. I am currently a member of a Wiccan/Pagan study group.

I have learned a few lessons from my experiences and am sharing them to, at the very least, make at least one person’s spiritual path a little easier. I’ll start with lessons I learned for myself and then discuss lessons I’ve learned from teaching others. I think that lessons from both can be equally applied to both situations.

Lessons from Self-Teaching

1. Read a lot. Read as many books as you can get your hands on. Read books from different publishers. Read different authors. Try to find books written in the beginning of the Witchcraft revival. Try reading a mixture of several books BEFORE beginning any type of magickal or ritual work. No matter how experienced you are, you can always still learn and it’s just waiting for you to get involved!

2. Learn and understand history and geography. In my case, the preference was for northern Europe before and during early Christianity. This will help you later with mythology, the history of the Craft, and God/Goddess studies.

3. Learn to meditate and visualize. Practice! Continue to practice even long after “you’ve got it”.

4. Question yourself and examine your motivations/knowledge. Always.

5. Keep an open mind and eye to other religions. They all contribute to your understanding of your path and yourself.

6. Don’t be afraid to ask yourself or others unpopular questions or questions that will cause doubt or confusion in your understanding of Wicca. You need to examine the path you’re on from as many angles as possible. This can only be done by examination and searching.

7. Don’t be afraid of admitting you’re wrong or ignorant on a topic. There’s no shame in admitting that you don’t know everything. Accept all information from as many sources as possible. In time, you will be experienced enough to sort out what is right, what is wrong, and what is just plain crap.

8. Be honest with yourself and your intentions long before thinking of self-dedication or self initiation. You should have a very solid understanding of Wicca, Witchcraft, Paganism, and Magick before embarking on your path as a “full fledged” Witch.

9. When choosing books, always try to find those done by actual scholars and historians. Anyone can write a book. Not anyone can write a book with decent material AND sources for information. Go for academics, not fluff to make you feel good.

10. Try to study early Christianity as much as possible. This will shed light on information about the history of Witchcraft, Paganism, and how things came to be. Medieval history and Roman history are good sources that offer insight into Celtic and Teutonic history/paganism as well.

11. When conducting ritual or casting magick, start out small. Focus on the basics and essentials. You can always build up on that at your leisure. And of course, remember the Wiccan Rede and Three Fold Law.

12. There’s no such thing as a stupid question.

13. I do recommend finding and meeting other Witches and Pagans. I’m not necessarily talking about teacher/student relationships. It’s good to meet others because it will reaffirm that, at the very least, you’re not alone, and by talking to others, you learn automatically and will gain new insights into the path that you’ve chosen. It’s always good to make new friends as well.

Lessons from Teaching Others

1. My first biggest lesson was to examine myself as to WHY I wanted to teach, and in turn, I had to deal with the responsibility of teaching someone else. I didn’t want to teach for glory, ego, reputation, fame, money, sex, etc. I wanted to give something back to the community for all that I have learned; I wanted to contribute to the greater whole, I wanted to give to and strengthen our community. I still forced myself to examine my intentions as to what I knew, why I thought I could be a teacher, and what I would be getting out of this. You need to ask yourself some hard questions before even beginning to teach. At first glance, you might have good intentions, but if your ultimate goal in teaching another is for selfish reasons, you probably shouldn’t be teaching. Remember the Three Fold Law and Wiccan Rede. Teaching from a wrong reason/desire/position on your part is just wrong.

2. It’s very important to know yourself and to know what it is that you actually know. It’s very important to know what it is you can actually offer someone as a teacher. I began teaching AFTER several years of self-study (tons of books AND discussions with others), group study, group/individual ritual, and personal experiences on the path. I would not have been in a position to teach prior to all of that and I recognized that in myself.

Don’t think that reading one or two books or “dabbling” in ritual is sufficient. You have to have mastered the fundamentals (core beliefs and concepts) long ago. Ritual should be easy and natural for you. You have to use critical thinking skills to rationally understand, explain, teach, and defend your beliefs and knowledge. You need to get out in the Pagan world before taking the mantle of “teacher”. If you don’t have the credentials- and I’m not talking about a degree system or prior coven initiation- you shouldn’t be teaching.

Remember, your student must leave the training better educated and equipped to walk on their path than what they were before the training began. Teaching is designed to IMPROVE someone’s knowledge, skills, and abilities.

3. Another lesson that I mentioned earlier was responsibility. You have to be responsible enough to honestly examine yourself and what you have to offer. If you don’t have what is needed to give another, then be responsible and don’t give. It’s also important to be responsible in the knowledge that you give. Don’t just mention the Wiccan Rede and Three Fold Law in two sentences and then walk away from the topic forever. You are responsible for explaining, in its entirety, the topics that you are teaching. Don’t give them lip service. You have to examine them, you have to examine them with your student, and you have to discuss the ramifications of what you’ve gone over. No matter the topic, you must thoroughly understand it and then present it with all angles for the student. One of the greater failures in a teacher is to “under teach” a topic and leave the student still ignorant of what was taught. You’re supposed to teach, not to confuse, or create ignorance.

Look at it this way: you are taking it upon yourself to help someone who wishes to walk the path of the Lord and Lady. If you don’t do a good, thorough job of teaching that person, have you caused more harm than good in the end? Have you helped someone truly understand and appreciate the God and Goddess? Have you helped the community by releasing someone who is ignorant of the path into that very community, or the “outside” community? Be responsible in your preparation and execution of teaching. Your student and community deserve nothing less.

4. This might sound stupid or redundant, but my student and I agreed up front on what our relationship was and what it would not be. Learning, living, and practicing on the path of the Lord and Lady with someone else forms a close, personal relationship. I wanted to make it clear that romantic love, sex, and relationships were NOT a part of what we were doing. I was the teacher, she was the student. In time we became close friends, but that relationship should be clearly defined up front and should be adhered to. I gave her personal references if she wanted to “check up on me” before the teaching began.

5. My student and I agreed on the length of time the entire teaching would take place — we used the traditional year and a day for our training period. We agreed to meet at least once a week and agreed to religiously (pardon the pun) stick to our schedule. Nothing kills the teaching/learning experience more than excessive absenteeism. Regular sessions reinforce what was learned before and keep the topic “fresh” in our minds. Make a regular schedule and keep to it. That’s not to say that you can change days for special events (ritual, Sabbats, etc.) but you must maintain a regular habit of teaching and learning.

6. Before I began to teach, I had to examine and determine what to teach and when. This included which books to use, and I had my student get the same books. I created a syllabus of topics and general dates. I listed the books that we would use to learn.

I broke the overall training topics into: General Information (an introduction if you will); Construction of a Book of Shadows (this BoS was constructed by the student and expanded throughout the entire training cycle); History of Wicca/Witchcraft (included were geography and northern European history); Core Beliefs; Laws/Rules (including discussions of morality and other issues relating to the Wiccan Rede, Three Fold Law, etc.); Cycle of Life (the Sabbats/Esbats); Meditation/Visualization; Goddess Studies; God Studies; Celtic Mythology; Norse/Teutonic Mythology; Magick; Ritual; and a Final Test. I also broke the topics/aspects/subjects up into smaller sub-topics. This way, I could thoroughly go over and teach each one in detail.

By breaking up the entirety of what I would teach into smaller portions, we were better able to both teach and learn by focusing on the subject at hand. It’s easier to digest a little here and there without throwing it all together in some vast melting pot. There’s a lot to Wicca. You can’t teach or learn it all in one day. You wouldn’t be fair or honest to yourself if you did.

7. Throughout the entire training cycle, I had tests for reviewing what was learned to ensure that we weren’t leaving a topic under examined or incompletely explained. I also ended up going over each Sabbat in detail prior to the actual Sabbat. I gave a copy of the syllabus to the student and we made every effort to stick to is as much as possible.

8. At the beginning of each training session, we would go over questions my student had from the previous session. This included questions that came up through self-study on her part. I would answer questions throughout the session (I encourage them!) and would answer questions at the end of the session. Demand that your student asks questions.

9. Personally, go over your training materials and subject in detail days before the class/session begins. Go over the material again right before class. You should have your act together before actually teaching. There’s no shame in having to refresh yourself on something that you are already very familiar with. Be as prepared as possible; your student deserves no less.

10. I focused on the academics before the practice. It was important to get the essentials fully understood before conducting magick and ritual. For me, this is because I see Wicca as a religion, not just “another method” of conducting magick. Our mind, heart, and soul must be in the right place before creating spells and playing with energy. My opinion, but I kept to it.

11. I had my student write essays, write out answers to questions, conduct exercises, and actually conduct ritual on her own. I used the building block technique, in that we started out with the core concepts and worked our way up the cycle piece by piece. We rehearsed ritual often and I routinely tested her on magick/ritual tools. I gave both scheduled and non-scheduled tests to find out what material had been learned sufficiently and what wasn’t still understood.

12. Near the end of the entire training cycle, we began to attend group ritual in order to expose my student to that aspect of the path and to introduce her to the community at large. It was important for my student to be exposed to others and their thoughts/ideas, as opposed to only getting information from me. I routinely told her that I was one person with my own opinions and that she should meet and talk with others to complement her education.

13. I taught my student about my experiences as a solitary and taught her my lessons in self-study. I encouraged my student to continue her studies on her own in addition to what I was teaching. I also encouraged my student to meet with others and talk to them about the path.

14. I learned more of the path that I walk by teaching. That lesson shouldn’t have been such a big surprise, but it was. By having to explain and teach Wicca, I have learned of it from an angle that was previously denied to me. I am very thankful of the experience for being able to appreciate and understand my path in more detail.

Hopefully, the lessons I learned will be of help to you in the future. Blessed Be.

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The Changing Role of Men in Wicca

The Changing Role of Men in Wicca

Author: Morgan Ravenwood

It is unfortunate but too often true that male Wiccans find themselves relegated to a passive, almost non-existent role in Wicca and many other Pagan traditions, thereby depriving their female counterparts of some potentially useful interaction, observations and teachings.

While many Wiccan women would defend this stance by pointing out that the Abrahamic faiths are male-centered and that they came to Paganism to avoid being forced to submit to male authority, they fail to realize that any faith that places emphasis on one gender over another is simply out of balance and deprives its members of both spiritual satisfaction and education.

We Wiccans must remember that it was a man, Gerald Gardiner, who originally gave birth and identity to the faith we practice today. However, he didn’t do so all by himself—he a lot of help and encouragement from women such as Doreen Valiente. Perhaps that is why the Gardnerian tradition has always promoted gender equality. Since then there have been some notable male Pagans such as Stuart Farrar, Oberon Zell, Isaac Bonewits, and more recently, Kerr Cuhulain and Christopher Penczak (who has written a great deal about gay Wiccans, whose numbers continue to grow) whose knowledge and experience have benefited us all.

A quick overview of some of the major Wiccan traditions certainly doesn’t inspire a man to want to join most of them unless he is willing to play a subordinate—and submissive- –role. While ones such as the various Druid groups and the Alexandrian and Gardnerian traditions seem to be more welcoming to the male practitioner, others such as the Dianic and Avalonian traditions are strictly matrifocal with no male participation at all. There are endless lists of Wiccan female-only groups on the web as opposed to barely a handful for men. All of this amounts to the same kind of sexism practiced by the mainstream religions, and is just as counter-productive.

We are all familiar with the concept of the Triple Goddess, which is of course worshiped by male and female Wiccans alike. While most female Wiccans relate the phases of the Goddess to our own lives, how do we apply this to the God, and in so doing, contemplate how this concept can be applied to men?

In my long years of study and correspondence with other practitioners, I have learned quite a bit from some very wise male Pagans. I recently asked some of them their opinions on this, and actually got some pretty similar answers, though one male friend said, “I hadn’t really ever thought about it!”

I can’t help but feeling that that is a very great shame indeed.

Equal gender identification really isn’t that difficult when you think about it. When we see the young Goddess as the Maiden, we could see her male counterpart as the Youth/Warrior/Student. As She reaches Her Mother stage, Her consort matures into the Father/Warrior/Hunter.

Opinions vary on when a woman has aged sufficiently to regard herself (and be regarded by others) as a “Crone, ” but on the other side of the coin, we again have her consort becoming an Elder/Sage/Grandfather. Though male Wiccans revere and venerate the Goddess in these various incarnations, might they not feel a little more comfortable if the God was given equal consideration?

Those female Wiccans who may belong to covens who worship the Goddess to the exclusion of the God might feel a little more in balance also.

When we look at the history of Paganism we find a large number of male deities such as Cernunnos, Dagda, Lugh, Cuchulainn, Pan, Osiris, Zeus, Apollo, and so many more. In ritual, particularly when petitioning for a special purpose, it is wise to aim such petitions towards a deity who may have certain characteristics particular to the object of the petition.

Male Wiccans especially may have certain issues that they feel more comfortable sharing with a male deity as opposed to a female one. That doesn’t mean, however, that they would (or should) eliminate worship of the Goddess in Her many forms—on the contrary, the male Wiccans of my acquaintance are very devoted to Her.

As in everything, balance and moderation are the keys.

We need look no further than our own Wheel of the Year to understand how important the God is to our religion. From Yule, when we celebrate the birth of the God, to Samhain, when He dies and prepares to be born yet again at Yule, our Sabbats are ironically centered on the God, with the Goddess both assisting and participating in a supporting (but no less important) role.

Consequently, it seems illogical and counter-productive to relegate the God along with male practitioners to a minor role in other Wiccan rites. While I am certainly not advocating the dissolution of all female-only covens, I DO encourage them to give some serious consideration to allowing serious male practitioners to participate in their rites. This would present many opportunities for fellowship and the sharing of knowledge, which would surely outweigh any perceived disadvantages.

The Religioustolerance.org website contains Edain McCoy’s description of the worship of Wiccan deities thusly: “We worship a deity that is both male and female, a mother Goddess and father God, who together created all that is, was, or will be. We respect life, cherish the free will of sentient beings, and accept the sacredness of all creation.” And yet, the same article also says, “Wiccans celebrate the sexual polarity of nature.

For example, the fertilizing rain is one manifestation of the male principle; the nurturing earth symbolizes the female. Females are respected as equal (and sometimes at a slightly higher rank) to males. A priestess is often the most senior person among covens — a local group of Wiccans. They aim for a female-male balance in most of their covens (local groups), although men are typically in the minority.”

The last sentence really reinforces the imbalance that exists in Wiccan practice and brings up a salient point: perhaps if more men chose to become involved in Wicca, it would drive up the numbers of Wiccan adherents and consequently make us more of a force to be reckoned with. The days of “broom closet” Wicca are coming to a close and we are already seeing the benefits such as the V.A. approval of the pentacle on the headstones of Wiccan veterans.

However, we must keep in mind that in order for more men to become interested in Wicca, they must be allowed equal consideration and status.

It’s a concept whose time has come.

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Let’s Talk Witch – Concerning Initiation


Fantasy Comments & Graphics
Initiation

Most shamanic and magical religions utilize some sort of initiation ceremony whereby an outsider becomes a recognized member of the religion, society, group or coven. Such rites also mark the new new direction which the initiate’s life is taking.

Much has been made, publicly and privately, of Wiccan initiations. Each Wiccan tradition uses their own initiation ceremonies, which may or may not be recognized by other Wiccans. On one point, however, most initiates agree: a
person can be a Wiccan only if she or he has received such an initiation.

This brings up an interesting question: Who initiated the first Wiccan?

Most initiation ceremonies are nothing more than rites marking the acceptance of the person into a coven, and her or his dedication to the Goddess and God. Sometimes “power is passed” between the initiator and neophyte as well.

To a non-Wiccan, the initiation might seem to be a rite of conversion. This isn’t the case. Wicca has no need for such rites. We don’t condemn the deities with which we may have attuned before practicing Wicca, nor need we turn our backs on them.

The initiation ceremony (or ceremonies, since in many groups three successive rites are performed) is held to be of utmost importance to those Wiccan groups still practicing ritual secrecy. Surely anyone entering such a group should undergo an initiation, part of which consists of swearing never to reveal their secrets. This makes sense, and is a part of many coven initiations. But it isn’t the essence of initiation.

Many people have told me that they desperately need to undergo Wiccan initiation. They seem to believe that one cannot practice Wicca without this stamp of approval. If you’ve read this far, you know that such isn’t the case.

Wicca has been, up until the past decade or so, a closed religion, but no more. The inner components of Wicca are available to anyone who can read and has the proper wit to understand the material. Wicca’s only secrets are its individual ritual forms, spells, names of deities and so on.

This needn’t bother you. For every secret Wiccan ritual or Goddess name there are dozens (if not hundreds) of others published and readily available. At this moment, more Wiccan information has been released than ever before. While it once may have been a secret religion, today Wicca is a religion with few secrets.

Still, many cling to the idea of the necessity of initiation, probably thinking that with this magical act they’ll be granted the secrets of the universe and untold power. To make things worse, some particularly narrow-minded Wiccans say that the Goddess and God won’t listen to anyone who isn’t an athame-carrying member of a coven. Many would-be Wiccans believe this.

It doesn’t work this way.

True initiation isn’t a rite performed by one human being upon another. Even if you accept the concept that the initiator is suffused with deity during initiation, it’s still just a ritual. Initiation is a process, gradual or instantaneous, of the individual’s attunement with the Goddess and God. Many of the Wicca readily admit that the ritual initiation is the outer form only.

True initiation will often occur weeks or months later, or prior to, the physical ritual.

Since this is so, “real” Wiccan initiation may take place years before the student contacts a Wiccan coven or teacher. Is this initiation less effective or less genuine because the person hasn’t gone through a formal ritual at the hands of another human being? Of course not.

Rest assured, it’s quite possible to experience a true Wiccan initiation without ever meeting another soul involved in the religion. You may even be unaware of it. Your life may gradually shift in focus until you realize that you notice the birds and clouds. You may gaze at the Moon on lonely nights and talk to plants and animals. Sunset might bring a time of quiet contemplation.

Or you may change as the seasons change, adapting your body’s energies to match those of the natural world around you. The Goddess and God may sing in your thoughts, and you may perform rituals before actually realizing what you’re doing.

When the Old Ways have become a part of your life and your relationship with the Goddess and God is strong, when you have gathered your tools and performed the rites and magic out of joy, you are truly of the spirit and can rightly call yourself “Wiccan.”

Source:

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner
Scott Cunningham.

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This is Wicca

This is Wicca

Author: Pulchra Lupus 

Before you begin, I would like to make my intended audience clear. This essay, while perhaps appreciated by my fellow believers, is more directed toward doubters, or new practitioners of the craft. This is meant to educate those ill informed or else those who are curious.

Wicca. What is your first impression, when you hear this word? Tainted witchcraft? Satanism? Evil? If these are among your thoughts, then you have been sadly misinformed.

Wicca is Pagan. This is very true. But Pagan no more means evil than being a bird means you can fly. Pagan came from the Latin word Paganus, literally meaning country-dweller or rustic. It is a religion predating Christianity by roughly twenty-eight thousand years, making it ancient and different. It is not Satanic Worship; the Devil had not yet even come into the picture. It is simply different, and the Old Church set out to destroy or convert that which scared it, that which it could not understand.

Pagans deal with more attacks, verbal and violent, for being what they are than nearly any other religion. But, the uneducated and the crude initiate those attacks. For, if you truly knew what Wicca was, you would know that we are no threat to you.

Those who practice this religion are benign, peaceful. They are comfortable with who they are, knowing that they have nothing to prove to anybody but themselves. They do not try to recruit others to their belief system; they do not try to convert others away from their religion. If a person comes to Wicca, they do it of their own free will. They do not attempt to harm others in any way, and they do not try to right any wrong done to them, especially with use of magick. This, in part, is due to their belief in the three-fold law, known by most simply as Karma.

We celebrate two deities, the God and the Goddess. These deities are known by many names. The Goddess is commonly associated with all maiden goddesses such as Artemis, Greek goddess of the moon and the Hunt, and Diana, Artemis’ Roman aspect, but she has three aspects, not just the Maiden. She is the Crone, the wise old woman stirring the cauldron, the Mother, who calls us all her children, and the Maiden, who is young and pure and kind. The God is depicted often with the antlers of a stag, and so many assume that he represents the Devil. This is not so. He is closely associated with the Greco-Roman gods of Pan, god of nature, and Apollo, got of the sun, of music and archery, of healing. Kernunos, Cernunnos, his names are also many. They both rule over nature, but they also have specific spheres of power. The Goddess rules the night sky and is the Mother of the Earth. The God is represented as the midday sun and is in charge of the hunt.

Wiccans do not worship trees, or rocks, or rivers. These are symbols that they attune themselves with in order to link with nature and, through it, to their deities. The elder tree is the Lady’s sacred tree, and oak is linked with the Horned God. The Wiccans believe that they are born of nature and that, when they die, their bodies return to the earth, and their souls travel to the afterlife. The afterlife itself is unique for each person. By definition, most do not believe in Hell, or Heaven, in the strictest sense. We believe that, when you die, whatever you imagined your death to be is what it will be. If you pictured yourself in Avalon, walking beside the Goddess among the apple trees, this is where you would go. We also believe in reincarnation; the God and Goddess give us the option of being reborn, with the knowledge that we will not remember our past lives and only the very bare essence of the soul will remain, bearing unconsciously the lessons learned in previous lives.

Wiccans do practice magick, but never should it be used in a way intended to harm or negatively affect our selves or another. They have two classifications of magick: white magick, and black magick. Black magick is practiced solely by those who divert from the true Wiccan path in a foolish quest for power, but all religions have their fools. The entire Wiccan existence is based on the belief that all life is sacred, and to intentionally take one’s life, as suicide or homicide, is gravely looked upon, but they try to see it as just another mistake.

Wiccans have the Wiccan Rede, which speaks of the Sabbats, the guidelines of the use of magick, and the respect of the higher powers. The final eight words are not negotiable, and are the firmest, set-in-stone rule of all Wicca, no matter the specific tradition. These words are: An ye harm none, do as ye will. Harm none. This is the one and only hard rule of Wicca. Hurt nobody. So why are our kind constantly attacked? Verbally abused with cruel insults, physically assaulted by those who know nothing of the true religion?

Why? Because everyone is afraid of what they cannot understand, and so they lash out in order to rid themselves of the fear by ridding themselves of the cause. But this is cruelty and an abuse of their rights as human beings, and we should not have to tolerate this as we do. We are not the neighborhood pot-smokers, nor are we the tattoo-riddled, pierced from head to toe hippies. Some fall into these categories, but so do some Christians, and Catholics, and Muslims. We are all human beings, regardless of our beliefs, and we should be treated as such. And yet, wars are started over things simple as this. This mass prejudice on not just Wiccans but all different religions is making us forget that we are all part of the same race. This is wrong, alienating our own kind over something as trivial as what god someone prays to. It isn’t our business what others believe in, and we should learn to leave well enough alone.

I hope this really made you think about your actions and others. I hope you can find it in yourself to rise above the most primal part of human nature and learn to love everybody, regardless of religion, or skin color, or language.

This is Wicca.

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Let’s Talk Witch – The Spiral of Rebirth


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The Spiral of Rebirth

 
Reincarnation seems to be one of the most controversial spiritual topics of our time. Hundreds of books are being published on the subject as if the Western world had only recently discovered this ancient doctrine.
 
Reincarnation is one of Wicca’s most valuable lessons. The knowledge that this life is but one of many, that when the physical body dies we do not cease to exist but are reborn in another body answers many questions, but raises a few more.
 
Why? Why are we reincarnated? In common with many other religions, Wicca teaches that reincarnation is the instrument through which our souls are perfected. One lifetime isn’t sufficient to attain this goal; hence, the consciousness (soul) is reborn many times, each life encompassing a different set of lessons, until perfection is achieved.
 
No one can say how many lives are required before this is accomplished. We are human and it’s easy to fall into non-evolutionary behavior. Greed, anger, jealousy, obsession and all our negative emotions inhibit our growth.
 
In Wicca, we seek to strengthen our bodies, minds and souls. We certainly live full, productive earthly lives, but we try to do so while harming none, the antithesis of competition, intimidation and looking out for number one.
 
The soul is ageless, sexless, non-physical, possessed of the divine spark of the Goddess and God. Each manifestation of the soul (i.e., each body it inhabits on Earth) is different. No two bodies or lives are the same. If this wasn’t so, the soul would stagnate. The sex, race, place of birth, economic class and every other individuality of the soul is determined by its actions in past lives and the lessons necessary to the present.
 
This is of utmost importance in Wiccan thought: we decide the lay of our lives. There’s no god or curse or mysterious force of fate upon which we can thrust the responsibility for the trials in our lives. We decide what we need to learn in order to evolve, and then, it is hoped, during incarnation, work toward this progress. If not, we regress into darkness.
 
 
Source:
 
Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner
Scott Cunningham
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Reincarnation | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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