Posts Tagged With: Tarot

Choosing Your Tarot Deck

Choosing Your Tarot Deck

By , About.com

 

For a beginning Tarot reader, few tasks are as daunting as actually choosing that first deck. There are hundreds of different Tarot decks available. Some are based upon famous artwork, movies, books, legends, mythology, and even movies. Others proudly declare on their sparkly boxes that they are not just Tarot cards — they are oracle cards, wisdom cards, healing cards, and all kinds of other things. Really, it can be a little overwhelming.

So how does a new person choose a deck? Well, it sounds very simplistic, but the best thing to do is choose a deck that feels right for you. Handle the boxes. Look at them. Ask the shop owner if they have any samples you can examine — most Wiccan and Metaphysical shops will have plenty of loose cards lying around, although your local Big Chain Bookstore will not. Ask friends who read Tarot what decks they prefer, and why.

While you’re looking at the decks, see if there’s a particular one that keeps getting your attention. Do you keep finding yourself picking up that Baseball Tarot package, because it reminds you of your late Nana who pitched a no-hitter in the All American Girls League seven decades ago? Do you think the artwork on the Cat People deck is mystical and seductive? Perhaps the Egyptian Tarot brings to mind some dreams you’ve been having lately. If there’s a certain deck that calls to you, that might be the one you need to get.

Do keep in mind that if you’re new to Tarot, and you plan to learn Tarot in a class, from a book, or from a website like this one, most follow the traditional 78 card format. If you choose a deck that bills itself as an “oracle deck” or “wisdom cards”, the cards may not correspond with the information provided in Tarot teachings. In other words, if you want to learn Tarot, be sure the deck you choose has the standard 78 cards.

Finally, if you’re really stuck, and you just aren’t sure which deck is the best one for you, it’s not a bad idea to pick up the Rider Waite deck. Aesthetically speaking, the Rider Waite deck may be lacking a bit, but it’s the one used most often as illustration in Tarot instruction books, and it’s a fairly easy system to learn. Later on, as you come to understand the cards and their meanings on an intuitive level, you can always add new decks to your collection.

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Tarot 101: A Basic Overview

Tarot 101: A Basic Overview

By , About.com

 

What is Tarot?:

To people unfamiliar with divination, it may seem that someone who reads Tarot cards is “predicting the future.” However, most Tarot card readers will tell you that the cards offer a guideline, and the reader is simply interpreting the probable outcome based upon the forces presently at work.

Anyone can learn to read Tarot cards, but it does take some practice. It’s a highly intuitive process, so while books and charts come in handy, the best way to actually learn what your cards mean is to handle them, hold them, and feel what they are telling you.

Tarot Decks:

There are hundreds of different Tarot decks available. Some are based upon famous artwork, movies, books, legends, mythology, and even movies. Choose a deck that feels right for you.

If you’re not sure which deck is the best one for you, and you’re a beginning Tarot reader, pick up the Rider Waite deck. It is the one used most often as illustration in Tarot instruction books, and it’s a fairly easy system to learn. Later on, you can always add new decks to your collection.

About The Cards:

A Tarot deck consists of 78 cards. The first 22 cards are the Major Arcana. These cards have symbolic meanings focused on the material world, the intuitive mind, and the realm of change. The remaining 56 cards are the Minor Arcana, and are divided into four groups or suits: Swords, Pentacles (or Coins), Wands and Cups.

Each of the four suits focuses on a theme. Sword cards generally indicate conflict or moral issues, while Cups reflect matters of emotion and relationships. Coins focus on the material aspects of life, such as security and finance, while Wands represent things like jobs, ambition, and activity.

How Do Tarot Cards Work?:

Any experienced Tarot reader will tell you that reading cards is an intuitive process. Like any other form of divination, the cards become a focal point for your own psychic abilities. There is any number of different spreads, or layouts, which can be used in a Tarot reading. Some readers use elaborate layouts, while others may just pull out three to five cards and see what they need to see.

One of the most popular layouts is the Celtic Cross method. Other well-known spreads include the Tree of Life layout, the Romany spread, and the Zodiac method. You can also create your own layout, like the Pentagram Spread.

Reversed Cards:

Sometimes, a card comes up backwards or upside down. Some Tarot readers interpret these reversed cards in a way that is the opposite of the card’s right-side-up meaning. Other readers may not bother with a reversed interpretation, feeling that the messages may be incomplete. The choice is yours.

Keeping Things Positive:

Although you may pull half a dozen cards for someone that indicate all kinds of gloom, doom, and destruction is headed their way, try to keep things positive. If you believe some sort of illness is coming, or their marriage is in trouble, DON’T say, “Holy cow, this is bad!!” Instead, remind them that things can change at any time, based upon the decisions they choose to make in life.

Read for anyone and everyone who will let you – and don’t be afraid to tell people what you see. Eventually, you’ll get comfortable with reading Tarot cards, and that’s when your skill will really shine.

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Tarot’s Fool Is No Dummy!

Tarot’s Fool Is No Dummy!

Celebrate April Fool’s Day by meeting Tarot’s most misunderstood Fool

Tarotcom StaffTarotcom Staff on the topics of tarot, insight
Here we go again: April Fools’ Day is upon us, and everyone is out to make a mockery of their friends and family just for the sheer amusement of it. Though while the origins of April Fools’ Day remain uncertain and difficult to trace, we can take this opportunity to explore the history of one of the Tarot deck’s most misunderstood characters: The Fool.
The Fool card in the Tarot card deck often gets a bum rap. He tends to be mocked as a naive idiot without direction or purpose … but things aren’t always as they seem, right? Let’s take a closer look at The Fool and what he can teach us.

When we think of The Fool Tarot card, we are reminded to let go of expectations and trust our instincts. We think of our spiritual journey and the desire for rebirth. As the very first card in the Tarot deck’s Major Arcana, The Fool signifies a fresh start or a new beginning.

Think of The Fool not so much as naive as open-minded and optimistic. The Fool is hopeful and positive, and he’s doing his best to shine a light on new beliefs, innovative and shocking ideas and the unpredictability of life. Given all the crazy wisdom this colorful character has to offer, it is easy to see why we celebrate him on April Fool’s Day.

Motto: May innocence find wisdom

Sometimes the word “fool” has negative connotations. Think of the simpleton, the childlike state of someone who is out of touch and who might be the focus of mockery. April Fools’ Day is a reflection of this perception. We pull pranks to try to make a fool out of someone and make our friends look silly. But there’s nothing silly about The Fool.

Historically, The Fool card may have appeared as a carnival entertainer, a huckster or a jester. Symbolically, it represented a person driven by base needs and urges, one who has fallen into a state of poverty and deprivation. By the 20th century the more familiar modern image and symbolism took over, and The Fool has been widely seen as the Tarot card hearkening renewing energy and a fresh start. Quite an evolution for The Fool!

Traditional Rider-Waite metaphors and imagery have prevailed within modern Tarot decks. Nature scenes depicting beautiful mountaintops include the image of The Fool getting ready to take an adventurous step into the unknown. Getting The Fool card within a Tarot reading is a reminder to appreciate our inner growth and our journey of personal development. It is the spirit in search of experiences, and the childlike wisdom we aim to employ as we go deeper into self-realization through new challenges.

Be encouraged when you draw The Fool card in any Tarot spread, you may soon face a new opportunity or challenge!

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Today’s Tarot Card for March 2nd – The Fool

The Fool

Sunday, Mar 2nd, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pamela Coleman-Smith’s artful rendition of an “innocent Fool” archetype (Rider-Waite deck) is often used to represent Tarot in general. Early classical versions of the Fool card, however, portray quite a different character — a person driven by base needs and urges, who has fallen into a state of poverty and deprivation.

In some instances, he is made out to be a carnival entertainer or a huckster. In others, he is portrayed as decrepit and vulnerable — as the cumulative result of his delusions and failures. Not until the 20th century do you see the popular Rider-Waite image of the Fool arise — that of an innocent Soul before its Fall into Matter, as yet untainted by contact with society and all its ills.

Modern decks usually borrow from the Rider-Waite imagery. Most Fool cards copy the bucolic mountainside scene, the butterfly, the potential misplaced step that will send the Fool tumbling into the unknown. Don’t forget, however, that the earlier versions of this card represented already-fallen humanity, over-identified with the material plane of existence, and beginning a pilgrimage towards self-knowledge, and eventually, wisdom. The Fool reminds us to recognize the path of personal development within ourselves — and the stage upon that path where we find ourselves — in order to energize our movement toward deeper self-realization.

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Your Rune For Thursday, February 27th is Ehwaz

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bw-Your Rune For Today    

Ehwaz       

Ehwaz represents movement. You may be closing in on reaching your current goals. Your life may be changing for the better. Harmony with others should come easy for you at this time

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Your Crowley Thoth Tarot Card for Feb. 27th is Adjustment

Your Crowley Thoth Tarot Card for Today

Adjustment

Adjustment denotes an inner power, mastery of will and development of inner might. Through mastering one’s emotions and learning from both success and failure the person Adjustment represents has reached a place where they are influential without applying physical force, able to weather the roughest of storms, and not likely to abandon the less fortunate. Adjustment also denotes a large capacity for forgiveness and compassion. Adjustment is not as much about winning as it is about achieving balance, overcoming hardship, and using well crafted persuasion to gain allies. Adjustment suggests the need and ability to make our decisions based on objective perceptions of events, and good or bad, accepting responsibility for our actions.

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Your Tarot Card for February 27th is The Moon

The Moon

Thursday, Feb 27th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What has traditionally been known as the Moon card refers to a deep state of sensitivity and imaginative impressionability, developed within a womb of deep relaxation. Here we dream and go into trance, have visions and receive insights, wash in and out with the psychic tides, and experience deep mystical and/or terrifying realities beyond our ordinary senses. The full moon and/or eclipse cycle charted by the Magi (as in some of the earliest Moon card images) exemplify this as a mechanism that Nature uses to expand consciousness.

The variants of the courtly lovers (representing skillful use of the sex force) or the man sleeping it off under the tree (use of drugs to alter consciousness) are also traditional avenues for tapping this primal force. Human interest in higher states propels us to the frontiers of consciousness, where we cannot always control what happens. The Moon card represents the ultimate test of a soul’s integrity, where the membrane between self and the Unknown is removed, and the drop of individuality reenters the Ocean of Being. What transpires next is between a soul and its Maker.

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Your Tarot Card for February 21 is Justice

Justice

Friday, Feb 21st, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traditionally, what has been known as the Justice card has to do with moral sensitivity and that which gives rise to empathy, compassion and a sense of fairness. Since the time of Solomon, this image has represented a standard for the humane and fair-minded treatment of other beings.

Often including the image of a fulcrum which helps to balance competing needs against the greater good, and a two-edged sword to symbolize the precision needed to make clear judgments, this card reminds us to be careful to attend to important details. It’s a mistake to overlook or minimize anything where this card is concerned. The law of Karma is represented here — what goes around comes around.

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